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MaynardKrebs
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to jaberi

Re: Court tells employers to accommodate child-care requests

I used to hire recently separated/divorced guys.
They had no life outside of work, so they'd readily put in 12-14 hours per day programming for a long time.



Styvas
Go Canucks Go
Premium
join:2004-09-15
Hamilton, ON

said by MaynardKrebs:

I used to hire recently separated/divorced guys.
They had no life outside of work, so they'd readily put in 12-14 hours per day programming for a long time.

Yeah, when I was single I'd find myself still at work after 12 or more hours, just puttering away on stuff. Now, I've got a wife and a life and I'm out the door at the end of the work day.

It's a life balance thing, and employers would be wise to recognize that accommodating that balance, even if it means small sacrifices like letting a guy go early to pick up his kids on a Friday, will lead to happier, more productive employees.


A Lurker
that's Ms Lurker btw
Premium
join:2007-10-27
Wellington N

said by Styvas:

It's a life balance thing, and employers would be wise to recognize that accommodating that balance, even if it means small sacrifices like letting a guy go early to pick up his kids on a Friday, will lead to happier, more productive employees.

It's not that employers shouldn't accomodate people. I have hourly guys who report to me (days & afternoons) and within reason I'm willing to play around with in early/late, make up time, etc. As long as I'm not behind the gun on something I'm pretty flexible. I'm also one of the few dept. managers that never has an issue getting people to stay / work extra etc. I suspect that the flexibility and a good relationship gets me the second part.

Generally the problem comes with salaried employees is that give and take isn't evenly applied. It's not unusual in my case to work extra hours (here in the plant) and I usually answer customer inquiries if they come in at night. If I'm watching TV it helps me the next day if I answer right away. From time to time (if schedule permits) I'll cut out early on a Friday. (I should note that early for me is basically after everyone has left, but technically before my quitting time.) However, I've never said 'I didn't take a lunch' so I'm going home early. If they did that for one person, why not all?

I'd be willing to bet (no matter how few employees) that there's always one salaried person who comes in just a few minutes late and runs out the door on the clock. Not likely for any good reason, but just because they get away with it. I've worked with many women and men with kids, and it's always just one person. I know where I was working a couple of years ago enough people took advantage of bad weather days that suddenly everyone had to make up time. Some people could work at home (which they had been doing) and were told that they couldn't.


Styvas
Go Canucks Go
Premium
join:2004-09-15
Hamilton, ON

said by A Lurker:

said by Styvas:

It's a life balance thing, and employers would be wise to recognize that accommodating that balance, even if it means small sacrifices like letting a guy go early to pick up his kids on a Friday, will lead to happier, more productive employees.

It's not that employers shouldn't accomodate people. I have hourly guys who report to me (days & afternoons) and within reason I'm willing to play around with in early/late, make up time, etc. As long as I'm not behind the gun on something I'm pretty flexible. I'm also one of the few dept. managers that never has an issue getting people to stay / work extra etc. I suspect that the flexibility and a good relationship gets me the second part.

Generally the problem comes with salaried employees is that give and take isn't evenly applied. It's not unusual in my case to work extra hours (here in the plant) and I usually answer customer inquiries if they come in at night. If I'm watching TV it helps me the next day if I answer right away. From time to time (if schedule permits) I'll cut out early on a Friday. However, I've never said 'I didn't take a lunch' so I'm going home early. If they did that for one person, why not all?

I'd be willing to bet (no matter how few employees) that there's always one salaried person who comes in just a few minutes late and runs out the door on the clock. Not likely for any good reason, but just because they get away with it. I've worked with many women and men with kids, and it's always just one person. I know where I was working a couple of years ago enough people took advantage of bad weather days that suddenly everyone had to make up time. Some people could work at home (which they had been doing) and were told that they couldn't.

I hear what you're saying, and I think, perhaps, it also depends on the industry/business type. I'm of the "get your work done on time and with the expected quality and how you organize your time is your business" mindset. If someone is skipping out early every day but also handing stuff in late or it's just shitty work, then I have a problem with that. But if they're taking half the amount of time given to perform quality work, then their boss should be giving them more work or giving them a break.