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Smokey Bear
veritas odium parit
Premium
join:2008-03-15
Annie's Pub
kudos:4

1 recommendation

What's Yours Is Mine: conception ex-employees what is normal

DarkReading | Feb 07, 2013

quote:
They can and will take it with them: Half of employees say they took corporate data with them when they left their jobs or were fired, and 40 percent plan to use that data in their new positions at other organizations, according to a new report.

Sixty-two percent don't think this practice is wrong, either: They say it's OK to take corporate data with them via their PCs, tablets, smartphones, or cloud file-sharing applications. Some 56 percent say using this information from their old employers is not a crime. They consider the person who created the intellectual property as its owner: Forty-four percent say a software developer who wrote source code for his company is part owner of that work, and 42 percent say it's no crime to reuse that source code at other companies.

But the real problem appears to be within many organizations that don't prioritize data protection and policies: Thirty-eight percent of the respondents say their managers consider data protection a business priority, while more than half say taking corporate data is legitimate because their organizations don't enforce any policies against it.
»www.darkreading.com/insider-thre···hem.html
--
»bit.ly/gUqYaH - C. Brian Smith: Think of the exclamation point as a car horn: a little goes a long way. Lay on it too hard and everyone’s going to think you’re a moron.
»bit.ly/V5mACB - How-To: Destroying a faulty keyboard

rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Mediacom

1 recommendation

Being ever the cynic, a survey conducted by a security company to reinforce how their product can solve the problem is seldom an indicator of a real problem. I am not delving into it, but it would be interesting to read the questions asked. How were they worded. Were they worded such that the answers are skewed? Such as did you ever take a document home? Define "Corporate data".
It would be just as easy to say all employees take "corporate data" with them when they leave a company. Until mind wiping becomes the norm, we can not selectively forget what we already know.



sivran
Opera ex-pat
Premium
join:2003-09-15
Irving, TX
kudos:1

"Corporate data" indeed. I actually grabbed the PDF and even there, it used broad terms like "intellectual property." Well, the manual for my company's product is IP, and I'd be perfectly happy to take it to another job if it'd be relevant, but it's not exactly sensitive. In fact I don't think I'd consider much if any of the data that I a) have access to and b) would be relevant in another environment to be "sensitive." Yet, of course, it's still "corporate data" and "IP" that I'd keep and use at another job.

Oh, and I just love the way it's worded, too:

said by the PDF :
The IP theft occurs when an employee takes any confidential information from a former employer. Half of the survey respondents say they have taken information, and 40 percent say they will use it in their new jobs.
From confidential information to just plain ol' information. Yup, sign me up for that. What do you wanna bet the question just said "information" and not "confidential information" there?
--
Think Outside the Fox.


Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Smokey Bear

Then there was the former coworker who left our company on less than happy terms, and was prohibited from taking his project-logo'd coffee mug with him... something about the project logo being company-proprietary information. Utterly petty and absurd! Without a lot more clarification, "company information" can be whatever one wants to make it.
--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to Smokey Bear

Indeed, it's a biased survey. Results are depended on the way, the question were asked. And they were asked in the way, that leads to conclusion - every company needs additional protection, that Symantec can offer to them. It's pure marketing...
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Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to Smokey Bear

And to balance the title "What's Yours Is Mine" (from the conception of some ex-employees) here is perspective form some owners: "Don't think that what you think is yours. It's mine." Well, good luck with that too

The truth as usual is somewhere in the middle.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



neochu

join:2008-12-12
Windsor, ON
reply to Blackbird

said by Blackbird:

Then there was the former coworker who left our company on less than happy terms, and was prohibited from taking his project-logo'd coffee mug with him... something about the project logo being company-proprietary information. Utterly petty and absurd! Without a lot more clarification, "company information" can be whatever one wants to make it.

I think thats the point the software is triing to make.

pretty much if the company says its "private data" even as simple as a logo'ed pen then they can tell you that your not allowed to take it.

Unless its of course your personal effects but even then its been discussed in this very forum how companies kick you out then ship your stuff in a box (sometimes broken up) a month later.

The survey is biased but unless its something you can prove that you own from offsite (or the company gave it to you like any framed awards) I don't think you have rights to anything.

Sensitive or not.