dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
364
share rss forum feed

Bob Anderson

join:2001-05-05
Ottawa, ON
kudos:1

Saw the ISS

I saw the International Space Station last night at 18:58 streaking from the SW to the SE over Ottawa at about 45 degrees above the horizon. At a speed of 20,000 KPH and 400 KM in altitude it was only visible for about 10 seconds because of patchy cloud cover. It is supposed to reappear tonight at 18:06. I remember seeing Sputnik, the Russian satellite launched in 1957. I was 11. It was painted black on one side and silver on the other and it rotated as it orbited, so it twinkled as it passed overhead of Victoria. That was the beginning of the space race.

-Bob



DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2

said by Bob Anderson:

I saw the International Space Station last night at 18:58 streaking from the SW to the SE over Ottawa at about 45 degrees above the horizon. At a speed of 20,000 KPH and 400 KM in altitude it was only visible for about 10 seconds because of patchy cloud cover. It is supposed to reappear tonight at 18:06. I remember seeing Sputnik, the Russian satellite launched in 1957. I was 11. It was painted black on one side and silver on the other and it rotated as it orbited, so it twinkled as it passed overhead of Victoria. That was the beginning of the space race.

-Bob

One of the better sites for tracking the ISS is Heavens-above. It gives you orbital predictions, maps and level of visibility. Ottawa should have some good opportunities to see the ISS for several minutes in the next few evenings.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


Thane_Bitter
Inquire within

join:2005-01-20
reply to Bob Anderson

Cool eh?

On a clear night if you can get well away from light pollution it is rather amazing how many satellites are orbiting around up there, while you will not be able to pick out any of the ones in a geosynchronous orbit there are a lot of other ones in different orbits which can be spotted.


graniterock

join:2003-03-14
London, ON
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·TekSavvy Cable

When I go up north it was always fun to let my eyes adjust and watch the satellites go around. I did the the ISS once too and it was alot brighter. It's pretty cool.

On my last trip I brought one of those skymaps for the ipad and turned the brightness down. What amazed me was that a number of moving dots that I thought were satellites were actually space debris! Mostly purposely disposed of shuttle peices. When picking random things out of the sky and comparing it to the map, I'm not even sure if I picked out a single satellite. All just junk.



FaxCap

join:2002-05-25
Surrey, BC
reply to Bob Anderson

Makes me want to drag out the old Newtonian. I really do have to
refigure that mirror though. It was my first and I think there is a
slight turned down edge.

FaxCap



Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8

A telescope is generally pretty useless for observing satellites because they just move far too fast (binoculars are better), but with a lot of luck, patience and skill it's sometimes really amazing what you can occasionally come up with!



J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
reply to Bob Anderson

I've only seen it once...I do recall it moving very fast. Too fast for an aircraft, way too slow for a meteor, so I figured it must have been the ISS. It was when I was up in Owen Sound back in August at the Mohawk. Tried to show my kids but they couldn't track it.
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein



FaxCap

join:2002-05-25
Surrey, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to Wolfie00

said by Wolfie00:

A telescope is generally pretty useless for observing satellites because they just move far too fast (binoculars are better)

I had an 8" f5 and a beautiful widefield eyepiece. I used to
disconnect the drive and sweep with the sat. You could see them
tumble if they were late stage lift vehicles.

FaxCap

booj

join:2011-02-07
Richmond, ON
reply to Wolfie00

said by Wolfie00:

A telescope is generally pretty useless for observing satellites because they just move far too fast (binoculars are better), but with a lot of luck, patience and skill it's sometimes really amazing what you can occasionally come up with!

For observing with an eyepiece, you are correct. Throw a CCD on the end of the telescope and you have a wonderful satellite tracking platform.

The Canadian Forces operates several of them:

»www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/22w-22···id=12449

»spaceref.ca/military-space/sapph···ite.html

»www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/satellites/neossat/