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OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON

[Help Me] DIR-815

I just replaced my DIR-615 wireless router with a DIR-815. I'd had the 615 about 3 years and was struggling with signal strength. The router is located at one end of the house in the basement and I was getting as weak signal, sometimes dropping, in a room on the main floor about 60 feet away. There is a steel beam and the main heating duct that runs the length of the house that the signal has to get through. I have 2 questions:

1. With the new DIR-815 router, I'm not sure that I see any more bars on my android tablet at the far end of the house than I did before. Should I? Isn't the 815 supposed to have more range than the 615?

2. I don't quite understand the dual band concept of the DIR-815. Supposedly one band is for data and the other for media, but I gave both the same network name and password that I had before with the DIR-615 so that anybody that used the WiFi could connect automatically just like before. However, how do I know which band I'm connecting to, or does it matter?



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CableOne

Many issues and variables effect WiFi.

Your dealing with extremes when you placing the 815 at one end of the house and trying to gain good signal at the other, even in the basement, this would probably problematic for any WiFi router. Placement is crucial and should be more central to the building. You may be in need of a range extender if this can't be achieved by central placement of the main host WiFi router.

Yes, building materials can effect signal as well. More metal and concrete with rebar, don't make for good signal travel.

Other external conditions can effect WiFi as well, like other neighboring WiFi.

You might want to try more central placement of the router, if not, additional extenders like APs might be needed.

Having dual band just means that on 2.4Ghz, is recommended for daily normal internet traffic like surfing and emails and such. 5Ghz can handle higher bandwidth traffic like video streaming and gaming. However 5Ghz is more effected by building materials and is recommended in line of sight. Nature of the 5Ghz beast on any router.

Either can be used for anything, just means that the pipe is bigger on the 5Ghz and you might not use it all up if your just surfing or emailing.


OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON

But should the DIR-815 not have a stronger signal (more range) than the cheaper DIR-515? I can't seem to find and find any numbers from the manufacturer.

I will get some longer ethernet cables and try to locate the router more centrally if it's still problematic.

But getting back to the dual band feature. Since I gave both bands the same name, they show up as one router. How do I know which one I'm connecting to, or am I connecting to both? Should I go back and rename them differently and choose which one to connect to?



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
reply to OLDYELLR

Most DIR series routers have about the same range. Mostly out putting about 1 mili watt on the antenna.

Your SSID names need to be different on between the 2.4 and 5Ghz radios, they can be similar however do need to differ.


OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON

You're right Bimmer. The signal from the new router is no better. In fact, it's not as good in places because I wasn't as careful adjusting the antenna reflectors I'm using.

I also notice that all the traffic has been on the 2.4GHz band and nothing on 5GHz, so I will have to go back and assign them different names to choose between "media" and "data". I did read that 2.4GHz is better for range, though, so I guess I won't gain any on 5GHz.



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CableOne
reply to OLDYELLR

»forums.dlink.com/index.php?topic=48327.0

5Ghz is good if placement is done well and limted building material involved. I'm current using a 5Ghz AP up in my bed room that also services a xbox game console directly down stairs. About 10-15ft and a wooden floor so signal is good.

Ya, if you can get into a DLink DAP-1525 or something that will help extend and bring better single to your situation. See if you can place the main host router in a more central location if possible. You should be ok though.


OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON

I think I'll first try moving the router to a more central location with longer cables. The steel beam and heating duct running the length of the house has to be the biggest problem.



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
reply to OLDYELLR

Keep us posted on how it turns out.


OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON
reply to OLDYELLR

I just reconfigured the router with different names for the two bands. So far nobody can see the 5GHz band. Not on my laptop, nor an iPhone, not on a PS2 and not on my Kobo Vox. It looks like this "dual band" router was a waste of time and money. Is this normal, or is there something somewhere in the setup that needs to be done to make the 5GHz band work?



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CableOne
reply to OLDYELLR

Your connected device need to be able to support the 5Ghz radio connection. Most devices don't. You'll need to refer to your device Mfr to see which ones do.

Most newer iPads and Laptops do support 5Ghz. Just have to see what doesn't.

PS consoles only support 2.4Ghz as well as iphones. Not sure if the iPhone 5 supports 5Ghz yet or not. Xbox 360 slims are the same, only 2.4Ghz.


OLDYELLR

join:2003-04-05
Woodstock, ON

Good to know. It looks like the router manufacturers have done an impressive piece of marketing, selling a feature only a small proportion of customers can even use.



BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CableOne
reply to OLDYELLR

Or you could think of it as router Mfr puting out features that will be eventually used by more people as time goes on.

Also having 5ghz is handy in cases where if you live in a WiFi congested area on 2.4Ghz, and all the channels are being used up, 5Ghz comes in handy.

Nothing wrong in having 5Ghz handy and some of your devices, PCs, Laptops, game consoles and media streamers if they have LAN wired connections could be upgraded to 5ghz by installing DLink DAP model APs and bridges and or using DLink DWA model USB adapters in USB ports.
»forums.dlink.com/index.php?topic=50738.0

Unfortunately cell phones, pads and pods would be limted to what they are built with.