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FF4m3

@rr.com

Linux Devs Working On Uniting Windows 8 Secure Boot Fixes

From ZDNet:

There are now two major ways to boot and install Linux on Windows 8 PCs, but soon they'll only be a single unified method.

Thanks to Microsoft's Windows 8 UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) Secure Boot there was no easy way to boot Linux, or any other operating system, on Windows 8 PCs. Now, there are two ways, the recently released Linux Foundation (LF) UEFI secure boot system and Matthew Garrett's shim system to boot Linux on these PCs. Soon, there will be only one unified way.

Garrett has decided to merge them together. He's now working on "integrating the LF loader's UI and security code into Shim with the aim of producing one loader that'll satisfy the full set of use cases."

Jame Bottomley, the Linux kernel developer behind the LF UEFI bootloader thinks this is a fine idea. "We’re currently investigating merging them. The main sticking point is the validity of the security override protocol," wrote Bottomley.

Once that problem is fixed, and the usual programming teething troubles are overcome, we'll see a new, unified Linux bootloader for all Intel-based Windows 8 PCs. Neither method, nor the forthcoming unified one, will work on any ARM-powered Windows RT tablet or laptop. Microsoft ARM-powered devices are permanently locked into Windows 8. Still, within the next few months, booting and installing Linux on Intel-based Windows 8 PCs will once more be a matter as simple as putting a Linux CD or USB stick in a PC and re-booting the system.



Snakeoil
Ignore Button. The coward's feature.
Premium
join:2000-08-05
Mentor, OH
kudos:1

That is good news.



FF4m3

@rr.com

said by Snakeoil:

That is good news.

+1!!!


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to FF4m3

Remember when the UEFI news broke and everyone was sure this was Microsoft's plot to prevent Linux on desktop PCs?

»Windows 8 Secure Boot Would 'Exclude' Linux

Good times, good times.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


TuxRaiderPen

join:2009-09-19

1 recommendation

said by JohnInSJ:
Remember when the UEFI news broke and everyone was sure this was Microsoft's plot to prevent Linux on desktop PCs?

»Windows 8 Secure Boot Would 'Exclude' Linux

Good times, good times.

You and others can continue to refuse to see this for what it is, and its goal, others will not drink the flavorade and fall for this.

This whole mess shouldn't even be taking place, period. The BIOS OEM's should be installing key or keys for Linux for those who wish to use this specious feature. This is where lack of Linux Inc. severely hurts and hampers Linux. Canoncial tried this in a manner before get run over by the bus, train, truck, tank and everything else....

This is classic ms at its normal EEE.
--
1311393600 - Back to Black.....Black....Black....


berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to JohnInSJ

Good times, good times.

I'm not so sure.

On the one hand, MS has set the stage, achieving dominance in the PC market with an intrinsically vulnerable OS. It's getting better, no doubt, but the legacy is crippling. OTOH, I imagine Unix-like operating systems will need to provide a comparable level of security to be relevant to government, business, and other consumers.

I don't know the details of what is involved, here, but I don't think MS is any more accepting of competitors WRT this technology or any other than is revealed in the Halloween Documents


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

I don't want to take this thread off topic, but clearly the PC landscape now is radically -one might say laughingly- different than it was in '98. Linux remains the same non-threat it was then to Microsoft, while the actual real threat (that people simply stop buying fixed desktops and even laptops, and instead spend 90% of their time on their phones and 10% of their time on a tablet NOT running Linux or Windows, but rather iOS or the abomination that is Android) is the threat Microsoft is doing everything to counter in order to survive.

Secure boot is much more about security, and (as has been demonstrated by the first post, above) did nothing to prevent Linux from being used on machines with it.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1

Laugh and mock at will. MS has not changed its spots. Some value the philosophy that is FOSS. Others, an increasingly higher percentage, perhaps, see only the short term personal benefits of low-cost/no-cost software.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by berserken:

Laugh and mock at will. MS has not changed its spots. Some value the philosophy that is FOSS. Others, an increasingly higher percentage, perhaps, see only the short term personal benefits of low-cost/no-cost software.

Yep, I am a long time Linux user. And a long time Microsoft user. And a long time Apple user. I'm just not a convert to the religion.

No need to preach to me, I just don't see Microsoft as the Great Satan these days. They may have been, in the 80s & 90s. Now they're just another large company, doing what large companies do.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


FF4m3

@rr.com
reply to FF4m3

Linux Foundation ships UEFI Secure Boot workaround:

The Linux Foundation's open source workaround for Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) Secure Boot has shipped, and while it's not necessarily the easiest way to boot Linux on UEFI-enabled PCs, its authors claim it should now work with any bootloader and any distribution.

For its part, Microsoft argued that OEMs were free to allow users to disable Secure Boot, so long as those who did so understood that they were reducing the overall security of their systems. But Linux enthusiasts observed that some OEMs were actually disabling the Secure Boot switch in their firmwares, leaving customers with no way to turn it off (and thus, no way to boot Linux).

It's worth noting that although the technical issues regarding Linux and UEFI Secure Boot seem close to being fully resolved, for many Free Software advocates the ethical issues remain outstanding. Bottomley's blog post announcing the Linux Foundation's pre-bootloader spurred lively debate, with several commenters insisting that the only workaround for Secure Boot that should be encouraged is to disable it completely in the UEFI firmware.



FF4m3

@rr.com
reply to berserken

said by berserken:

Laugh and mock at will. MS has not changed its spots.

Exactly. +1000


chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
reply to FF4m3

Make zero difference to me. I do not plan on using Secure Boot. I do not need it or want it.
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!