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DarkRealm
Don't Fear The Reaper

join:2001-05-09
DarkDomain
kudos:7

Injection Foam Insulation

Has anyone had any experience with this type of insulation ? Our house is made of brick and was constructed in 1967, so doubt if there is much insulation in the walls. Overall square footage of house is 1624sq ft.

I am going to get an estimate from the local company, but wanted to know if others haved had this done and what the feeling is overall about this. I am trying to reduce our energy bills for both Fuel Oil and Air Conditioning if possible.

»usa-insulation-ohio.com/injectio···ulation/

Thanks

DR


zippoboy7

join:2006-06-18
USA

1 recommendation

While I personally have not used this stuff, I do have a friend who had there walls injected with a foam product, the results were good on the energy bills but hard on the wallet when they had to replace most of the drywall that had become wavy and uneven from the foam expanding. While this product may be better you should be sure they are insured in case the same kind of thing happens to you.



08034016
Hallo lisa Aus Amerika
Premium
join:2001-08-31
Byron, GA

said by zippoboy7:

While I personally have not used this stuff, I do have a friend who had there walls injected with a foam product, the results were good on the energy bills but hard on the wallet when they had to replace most of the drywall that had become wavy and uneven from the foam expanding. While this product may be better you should be sure they are insured in case the same kind of thing happens to you.

The reason the walls did this is the Company did it incorrectly.
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The E
Please allow me to retort
Premium
join:2002-05-26
Burnaby, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to DarkRealm

I've seen a few instances of this stuff not being applied correctly, including on an episode of Holmes on Homes.

Over-expansion may be a problem, but more concerning are the massive gaps and missing spots that often are left behind. How can you possibly tell how thorough a job they do if all the walls are closed up? Hell, how can they tell?

If it's really an issue, I'd rather pull the drywall or plaster off the exterior walls and insulate properly, including a vapour barrier (unless using closed cell foam)
--
"All opinions stated by me are solely my views and do not reflect the views of my employer, this site, or even myself depending on my level of sanity at the moment"


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

said by The E:

but more concerning are the massive gaps and missing spots that often are left behind. How can you possibly tell how thorough a job they do if all the walls are closed up? Hell, how can they tell?

I think this would work great in a house with absolutely no insulation in the walls. I have worked on homes built in the era of the OP's and I don see any way that they could get good dispersion of the liquid foam. I think all it will do is make a mess on a mid 60's house.


gschwendtner

@ptd.net
reply to DarkRealm

I did this two years ago in a east coast full brick 1950's colonial, they drilled a ton of holes through the mortar joints all around the house from top to bottom. They then injected the foam in the space between the brick and the cinder block. I am pretty sure the foam brand was applegate, it was made specifically for this application.

The results were amazing, no more cold spots, no more drafts, all the rooms the same temperature. We also foamed the roof deck and the end walls in out walk up attic. The second floor was always colder in the winter than the first floor, now the first and second floors are within a degree of each other. We no longer have to run a humidifier in the winter, the house stays between 35 and 45 percent depending on the outside temperature.

We had one small issue with the inset radiator enclosure pans, the back of the pan was cut into the block so when they pumped the foam in the dining room, one popped out a inch or so, we were able to push it back in, caulk and paint and you can't tell there was an issue.

The other thing to keep in mind is that you are going to tighten the house up hard core. We keep an dehumidifier set to 45 percent running in the attic year round, since it is a dead zone with no real air exchange going on up there and we don't have any issues. I empty the pan every now and then and in the winter it never has much water in it.

I have my office up there and the computer equipment up there keeps its comfortable in the winter and a small window unit keeps it cool in the supper. We are also vigilant about running the bathroom fans on a timer after showers and the exhaust range in the kitchen going on during cooking. When using the dryer and the exhaust vents at the same time, There is a slight back draft from the fireplace, which we do not use, since it never really drafted well to begin with. The boiler had its own sealed intake so we have no issues with drafting combustion gasses back into the house.

I am going to put in a heat recover ventilator at some point to increase the amount of air exchanges. We had an energy audit done a couple of years ago and the blower door results were horrifying pre-insulating.

This was a professional company the did this commercially full time, not some fly by night guys who bought some barrels of material and go to town. They had a guy on a radio inside when they were injecting giving them feedback of when to stop and move to the next hole. They came back in filled in the couple of hundred holes with mortar when they were finished.

I am 110 percent satisfied with the results.

The best part is we do not have stink bugs in our house, we have friends with drafty wood frame houses and they cant get rid of the stink bugs! They find all the cracks and crevices and set up shop in the house.

It was not cheap, but I would not hesitate in doing it again, the house is so much more comfortable to live in. Our oil consumption was cut in half, we went from burning about 5 gallons a day in the winter to about 2.2 gallons, that is with 2 adults, two young children with a domestic HW coil in the boiler, and a automatic power damper on the exhaust. We also trimmed quite a bit off of the central AC bill in the summer.



DarkRealm
Don't Fear The Reaper

join:2001-05-09
DarkDomain
kudos:7

1 recommendation

reply to DarkRealm

Thanks for all the information and such. We have decided to go ahead and do this on our house. Once it is complete and such I will let you all know of the difference as well.



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma

said by DarkRealm:

Thanks for all the information and such. We have decided to go ahead and do this on our house. Once it is complete and such I will let you all know of the difference as well.

I'm eager to hear about it. My "new" house is block construction and I really think it could benefit from this. My only concern is that it's all stucco over the block. I wonder if they'd be able to find the right places to drill the holes and am concerned how well they could be repaired.
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DarkRealm
Don't Fear The Reaper

join:2001-05-09
DarkDomain
kudos:7

2 recommendations

John97,

According to the company I am using here in OH they do Stucco as well, when they start on my house I will ask the guys about block construction with stucco over the block and how they do it and see what they say.

I am going to try and take some pictures during the process as well.

DR



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma

said by DarkRealm:

John97,

According to the company I am using here in OH they do Stucco as well, when they start on my house I will ask the guys about block construction with stucco over the block and how they do it and see what they say.

I am going to try and take some pictures during the process as well.

DR

That would be most excellent. Thank you!
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...


DarkRealm
Don't Fear The Reaper

join:2001-05-09
DarkDomain
kudos:7

1 recommendation

The company arrived today and are completed now with the insulation. I will know how well it is working in the next few days when the temps at night get down into the teens again.

So far I am impressed with the service of the company the the information I got as well from the installer while they were doing the work.

Expand your moderator at work

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus

Re: Injection Foam Insulation

said by 07265871:

The spray foam insulation keep our heating bills down. Foam insulation not only keeps the heat in the winter, but also keep expensive, cool, air conditioned air in during hot summer months. It is better than other insulation. Foam insulation is good idea for protect to our home and it has highest r value. So I will suggest you foam spray insulation company.

ALL insulation will "keep ... heating bills down" and keep cooling bills down, as well. The difference in R value over other types is certainly a consideration, and that difference, factoring in the total heating and cooling costs, should be used to determine if it's worth spending the extra money on the foam. Factors like how long you may want to stay in the house and any possible increase in resale value (likely to be very small) also should be part of the equation.


pende_tim
Premium
join:2004-01-04
Andover, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Also, if properly applied, foam will provide a monolithic barrier that greatly reduces air infiltration.

This may have a more beneficial effect on heating/cooling costs in an older home than just the increase in R value.

In some older homes infiltration can account for 50% of the energy cost.
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The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.