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bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to NOVA_UAV_Guy

Re: You think they'd figure it out...

said by NOVA_UAV_Guy:

And yet they still insist that "cord-cutters" aren't impacting their business, that Hulu and Netflix are inconsequential, and insist on keeping miserly control over as much content as possible...

I would expect that they are right....given the limited amount of content, especially Sports related, and the effort required to setup, I suspect that the majority of video sub losses are to competitors like DirectTV, Dish, AT&T or Verizon.

NOVA_UAV_Guy
Premium
join:2012-12-14
Purcellville, VA
Reviews:
·Comcast
I can see your point. However, to assume that a certain percentage of people aren't leaving them and the satellite providers behind for Netflix, Hulu, and the like would be a mistake.

Streaming media is getting easier and easier to set up, especially with Roku, smart TVs, and nearly point-and-click apps like PlayOn. XBMC and Plex come to mind as well, for people with a little more technical inclination and an extra PC. Thanks to their Windows-friendly binaries, even people like my senior citizen aged parents have media servers in their homes. (Granted, I was the one that set it up for them... but they could have set it up themselves.)

I hear what you're saying about sports events (and potentially local channels, if your reception with an antenna isn't the greatest). Services like Aereo at least have the potential of filling the gap for local channels... and sports events too, if you care about following the local teams.

ESPN does support streaming from their web site, if you are a subscriber to certain ISPs. If cord-cutting gets even more popular, I can see ESPN providing direct-to-user subscriptions in the future for streaming too - as well as other live event sports channels. There's a potential for greater per-subscriber revenue with the direct-to-user model as well, as ESPN eliminates the cable/satellite middle man and gets their cut of the profits too. I suspect that eventually you may see regional sports networks leverage this model as well.

A couple years ago I wouldn't have considered doing any cord-cutting. Today I feel that I'm on the cusp of doing so. I've amassed a fair number of movies and TV shows on my home media server, subscribe to Hulu and Netflix, and plan to subscribe to Aereo when it becomes available in the DC area.
--
The only difference between Bush and Obama is the group they're wasting our taxpayer money on. It's time to elect responsible legislators.


bbeesley
VIP
join:2003-08-07
Richardson, TX
kudos:5
said by NOVA_UAV_Guy:

I can see your point. However, to assume that a certain percentage of people aren't leaving them and the satellite providers behind for Netflix, Hulu, and the like would be a mistake.

I absolutely agree that some customers are cutting the cord. I just don't think the number is statistically significant enough to be more than a blip on the marketing department's radar.

They are more concerned with controlling the losses to the satellite and telco competitors today

will that change in the future? Likely yes, but a lot has to change in the market. Some company needs to get retransmission rights on enough content and then figure out a way for their potential subscribers to obtain it that is dirt simple enough for the average Luddite to install easily.