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prouser

join:2013-02-13

Privacy Concern - What can a Shaw employee see?

Fairly simple query, outside of the regular customer information ie, persons name, contact info, what can a Shaw employee see as it pertains to traffic over a cable connection?


Shaw_Alex
Official Shaw Rep

join:2010-12-16
kudos:1
Employees can see your modems Signal Strength, Error rate and daily upload download and upload amounts, but not the actual data content.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
I'm curious how much data the new terminals contain on the log uploads.

I might request someone send me mine when I have time to look in a couple weeks... hummm...

-Posted from my phone.


ShawUserX

@shawcable.net
reply to prouser
I know with the gateway for TV they can look at what is recording when etc...

Wouldn't doubt with the all-in-one routers they can see at least all your connected devices if they wanted.

ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2
reply to prouser
Paranoia (tin foil hat) perspective:

Everything you do on the internet that is NOT ENCRYPTED can be seen by your carrier (and other networks, and website tracking companies to some extent), so someone can see everything if they want/need to.

If you are concerned by this, look into TOR. (This will make your connection slow).


ShawUserX

@shawcable.net
reply to prouser
Was just interested in what they can see/do with these all-in-ones that people don't have full control of.

Don't do anything on the internet you don't want others to know about! Always interesting to know what can be done

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to ravenchilde
That and all it takes to see the encrypted traffic as well is sneaking a root certificate onto your computer at some point...
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.

ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2
That could be illegal Kevin, and no carrier would do that.

Your employer might however, and have full legal grounds to do so.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
I agree, I thought it was relivant to the tin-foil-hat perspective though


itdepends

@terago.net
It depends on what employee roll your looking at it from. Can a TSR see detailed traffic information? No. Can a Network engineer, specialist, or NOC analyst see? Yes. It is a fairly easy task for them to do a "investigation" into traffic, sniff data, use the packet shapers etc etc. Even more to the point they can collect stats on where and what kind of traffic your doing.

The bottom line is if Shaw employee in the right role can see anything he / she would like to coming across the network.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw
I'm not sure how illegal it is with a provider's terms of use either...

I know there was a cellular carrier that was giving me SSL errors, on all ssl traffic because I didn't have their root certificate installed.

Grr cellular proxy servers... haha

There aren't too many reasons that their root would be used in signing my server's traffic...

-Posted from my phone.

ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2
The Opera and Amazon mobile browsers do this, and they can see even your SSL traffic.

KernelKurtz

join:2012-06-25
reply to ravenchilde
Everything you do on the internet that is NOT ENCRYPTED can be seen by your carrier



Pretty much sums it up.


humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter
reply to kevinds
said by kevinds:

I know there was a cellular carrier that was giving me SSL errors, on all ssl traffic because I didn't have their root certificate installed.

Grr cellular proxy servers... haha

There aren't too many reasons that their root would be used in signing my server's traffic...

-Posted from my phone.

I guess you missed this article?
»Nokia Accused of Hijacking, Decrypting User Data

using a proxy server(like Opera mini) is not encrypted end to end(site to you to site). It is from you -> proxy -> site- back to proxy -> you.
It has to do with opening the traffic at the proxy to compress it before sending it to you to save on your bandwidth usage.

So really in regards to OP's traffic, he would have to run a 'trusted VPN' to encrypt all his traffic from the prying eyes of his ISP. Would be simple for the ISP to log certain unencrypted traffic based on protocols or visible websites visited. Not legal to do without a court order, but we are all terrorists in the eyes of the copyright mafiaa government.

In regards to the all in one router/modem, Based on posts of users on U.S. ISPs, they can get into your LAN. The Posts detail support being allowed access(request for permission to access) to get into the users computer to correct crappy ISP supplied products errors or to attempt setting changes on gullible peoples computers.
The ISP(or occasionally your neighborhood cable modem hacker) can also use the various TR backdoors to change modem/router settings when the user is having issues on the unit.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw
One US ISP i looked at, had remote access open on the internet side, with the default user/password, so anybody could do that with someone's IP address (or just scan for the specific open port), wasn't a wise 'feature' to have enabled...
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.

ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2
reply to humanfilth
said by humanfilth:

So really in regards to OP's traffic, he would have to run a 'trusted VPN' to encrypt all his traffic from the prying eyes of his ISP.

This actually isn't true. With a VPN the 'endpoint' where the traffic is decrypted and enters the internet can be known. For real tin-foil hat paranoia you need to use a mechanism like TOR, where not only is your traffic encrypted, but the endpoint changes as well, and then network is more dynamic.