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devolic
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oscoda, MI

1 edit

[hard drive] Problem with physical hard drive

The other day I had problems accessing it. It does however show up in the bios. Before I got this error it said to run chkdsk. I tried that and when I go to start it the screen closes immediately. Is there any other way to check it or rescue my files on it? It's an older Maxtor, 6L100P0
--
WinXP Pro SP3


Dogg
Premium
join:2003-06-11
Belleville, IL

What type of drive (internal or external)? What is the drive status in Disk Management?
--
Google is your Friend



devolic
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oscoda, MI
reply to devolic

Internal, healthy & active but it also shows 100% free space which I know is incorrect.
--
WinXP Pro SP3



sbconslt

join:2009-07-28
Los Angeles, CA

The chkdsk output closed immediately because you invoked it directly from the Run... box. Instead, issue "cmd" in the Run... box or start a Command Prompt from Programs > Accessories, then invoke chkdsk from the prompt. Then it won't close when it finishes, and you'll be able to read the results.
--
Scott Brown Consulting



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to devolic

Sounds like the partition table is mangled (hope not!), or the filesystem itself has some major errors.

You need to run chkdsk /f F: via Command Prompt (if Vista or newer, as Administrator). If prompted to "force a dismount", say n. When prompted to "check it the next time the system restarts", say y. Then close the window and immediately restart the computer as you would normally.

This should trigger CHKDSK to run on the next reboot, although it may check C: and other drives as well.

If you can install HD Tune Pro (not the free version please; the Pro trial is fine) and provide me a screenshot of the Health tab for the Maxtor drive, that would be helpful to rule out any physical issues with the drive.

Thanks.

--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



devolic
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oscoda, MI

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said by koitsu:

Sounds like the partition table is mangled (hope not!), or the filesystem itself has some major errors.

You need to run chkdsk /f F: via Command Prompt (if Vista or newer, as Administrator). If prompted to "force a dismount", say n. When prompted to "check it the next time the system restarts", say y. Then close the window and immediately restart the computer as you would normally.

This should trigger CHKDSK to run on the next reboot, although it may check C: and other drives as well.

If you can install HD Tune Pro (not the free version please; the Pro trial is fine) and provide me a screenshot of the Health tab for the Maxtor drive, that would be helpful to rule out any physical issues with the drive.

Thanks.


--
WinXP Pro SP3


devolic
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oscoda, MI
reply to sbconslt

said by sbconslt:

The chkdsk output closed immediately because you invoked it directly from the Run... box. Instead, issue "cmd" in the Run... box or start a Command Prompt from Programs > Accessories, then invoke chkdsk from the prompt. Then it won't close when it finishes, and you'll be able to read the results.

I checked the disk for errors under the tools option for the drive I didn't run chkdsk in the start menu. That's when it closed
--
WinXP Pro SP3


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to devolic

It looks like the NTFS volume (F:) is damaged beyond repair using CHKDSK. However, you should (ideally) be able to use a commercial (reasonably-priced (US$80 for a lifetime updates)) tool like GetDataBack (for NTFS) to recover all/most of your files.

Your SMART statistics for the drive look great, despite it's age (that's quite an old drive! ). Meaning: no sector-level issues or otherwise. I'm inclined to think something malicious may have damaged the partition table and/or NTFS filesystem identification structures on your drive.

Give GetDataBack (for NTFS) a try. Recommended method:

* Install the software
* Choose Quick scan first and see what comes back. (Note: You do not want to recover/scan for deleted files, since the files presumably weren't deleted, just the NTFS structures are damaged in some way)
* If nothing comes back with Quick scan, go with Systematic file system damage instead.

* In Step 1, pick the hard disk in question listed under Physical Drives (and NOT Logical drives!). It should list a single NTFS partition.
* In Step 2, there should be a list of filesystems found -- possibly more than one. Pick whichever one has a green dot on it and has the lowest sector number for "NTFS at sector X".
* MFT analysis will begin. This can take a very, very long time in some cases (as in hours); there are some options under Tools/Options which can speed this up or make this longer, depending on what the results are in step 3 below.
* Step 3 should provide a conclusive list of what directories/files it finds on your drive. What the colours mean is shown in the legend at the bottom of the window.
* Select the files/directories you want to recover (please exclude things that start with $, as well as RECYCLER and System Volume Information), right-click and choose Copy, and then choose where you want to restore the data to. Do not restore the files to the same drive (F:)! I doubt the tool will let you do this, but don't do it anyway! Restore them to another drive (C:, etc.). This extraction may take a long while.

After that, you should try re-partitioning and re-formatting your F: drive using Disk Management (it's under Administrative Tools in the Control Panel), and copy the files back from (example) C:to F:. Don't delete the files from (example) C: until you've verified you can use F: normally again.

Hope this helps.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to devolic

Others here will advice not to take advise from too many sources on this due to 1 wrong turn and it is all gone and I agree, be aware of anything you issue to this HDD and with the members already replying, you are in good hands.

1 question and I'll back out from confusing the issue.

What does disk management say?

Start-Control Panel-Admin Tools-Computer Management-Storage-Disk Management?
Can you provide a screen shot of the HDD and do not play with any settings.

Thanks
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to devolic

»www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk
Some detailed walk-through here: »www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/···d-state/
including

Do not run chkdsk until the important data is recovered. Chkdsk prioritizes repairing over recovering so if it needs to destroy data in order to do a repair, it will.

Good luck