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deke40
Premium
join:2003-01-23
Texas

1 edit
reply to Beezel

Re: Best Tires On Back Axle

Your train of thought is like mine was. Here is an article that changed it.

If the front tires have significantly less tread depth than the rear tires, the front tires will begin to hydroplane and lose traction on wet roads before the rear tires. While this will cause the vehicle to understeer (the vehicle wants to continue driving straight ahead), understeer is relatively easy to control because releasing the gas pedal will slow the vehicle and help the driver maintain control.

However, if the front tires have significantly more tread depth than the rear tires, the rear tires will begin to hydroplane and lose traction on wet roads before the fronts. This will cause the vehicle to oversteer (the vehicle will want to spin). Oversteer is far more difficult to control and in addition to the initial distress felt when the rear of the car starts sliding, quickly releasing the gas pedal in an attempt to slow down may actually make it more difficult for the driver to regain control, possibly causing a complete spinout.

The two main points were understeer and oversteer and one being harder to control.

Since the tires I wanted left on the back were at 6/32nds I was willing to take the chance because the front ones wear at a very fast rate when on the front on my particular car.(HHR) I figured if I put the 6/32nds ones on the front like DS wanted they would be wore out before I trade the HHR in late in the year.

This info was from this link:

»www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/···echid=52

Notice the third paragraph. It is what I am striving for but actually not a good idea. But it fits my purpose. Although I rotated mine every 6k they still ended up with the ware they are talking about.



TheTechGuru

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TEXAS
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And if the tires aren't rotated at all, it's likely that the rear tires will still have about 1/2 of their original tread depth remaining when the front tires are completely worn out.

Funny, my rear tires wear out faster than my front tires. Oh wait, my car is RWD.
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Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
reply to deke40

I don't care what the experts say. In a front wheel drive car, I want the tires with the most tread on the front.



Cho Baka
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said by Bob4:

I don't care what the experts say. In a front wheel drive car, I want the tires with the most tread on the front.

Well, I have had a few FWD cars with new tires (or snow tires) on the front.

Making a left turn with one at moderate speeds saw a reaction similar to trailing throttle oversteer in the snow. Very unpredictable and not at all easy to control. I spun it twice, and went with 4 snows the following winter.

Another sees the rear end very loosey-goosey in the snow. This one is also FWD, but is slightly more controllable in the slip condition.

The basic premise is that a vehicle can transition from having a very predictable nature with 4 equal tires to having very unpredictable handling characteristics with 2 new tires on the front.
Those same people who fought to put the new tires on the front will also happily sue the tire manufacturer and tire shop in the event of an accident.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

So if I have 8/32" on the front and 6/32" on the back, my car turns into a death trap?



Cho Baka
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said by Bob4:

So if I have 8/32" on the front and 6/32" on the back, my car turns into a death trap?

That is a pretty disingenuous reply.

I didn't say that. Not even close.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
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said by Cho Baka:

said by Bob4:

So if I have 8/32" on the front and 6/32" on the back, my car turns into a death trap?

That is a pretty disingenuous reply.

I didn't say that. Not even close.

OK, but it's a serious question: At what point does the difference in tread depth become a problem?


Cho Baka
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said by Bob4:

OK, but it's a serious question: At what point does the difference in tread depth become a problem?

I personally don't see an issue with the scenario you described. A little common sense is needed.

New tires on the front, and 5 year old tires with 4/32" on the rear, I would be more concerned.
We have arrived at this situation because the lawyers will take advantage of any opportunity to make a buck, and people are always looking for a reason why an accident wasn't their fault.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


BonezX
Basement Dweller
Premium
join:2004-04-13
Canada
kudos:1
reply to Bob4

said by Bob4:

OK, but it's a serious question: At what point does the difference in tread depth become a problem?

not at all when they are both bald as hell.

basic thing, if the conditions are beyond what the tire can support at the tread level it is at you will have issues, if not, the difference doesn't really matter too much, IE: don't try to out drive the tires.

easiest is just don't drive to the limit of the best tire. if you know the rear ones are bad figure out where their limit is, and drive accordingly.

but try telling your average all season awd SUV driver to drive according to the conditions, you get some amusing replies.

:edit: yea completely forgot the lawyer thing, that's going to be an issue no matter how big/small, front/back the difference is.