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dockmaster

join:2011-10-30
Pensacola, FL

Wireless access point or Router?

I have a Belkin N+ Wireless router installed in my office. Wireless is enabled and work ok in the off, a bedroom or two and the livingroom, but not the back of the house (FL room) or outside by the pool. I have a cat 5 cable run from the router to my wife's computer in the FL room. I'd just as soon leave her computer hardwired so I dont have to listen.....well you get it....works fine now!!
I see I have two options. Install a wireless access point near her computer and run a cat5 cable a few feet to her computer and I will also have wireless on that side of the house

Or....If installing a wireless N router instead of an access point, and configuring it as an access point, do I gain any advantage in speed or distance of signal? It looks to me that all the access points on Newegg are B/G.....if I configure a router as an access point is it possible to get b/g/n. N would give me more distance, correct?
If theres no advantage, I'll just go with the access point. I want the same ssid so i dont need to be changing as i move around.
I'm also thinking of getting the old ugly blue Linksys with antennas, wrt45G since its like the jeep of routers and there like free now.

thanks
bill


billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:5

1 recommendation

The only real advantage to using a router as an AP is the built-in switch ports. If you use an AP, you'll also need a switch so you can connect the AP and PC to the cable coming from the main router.

If any of your wireless devices support 5ghz, then I would suggest getting a simultaneous dual-band router or AP for the second location.


SoonerAl
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-23
Norman, OK
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to dockmaster
Click for full size
I would go with a router configured as a wireless access point just because you gain the addition LAN ports.

»Wireless Networking Forum FAQ »Using a Wireless Router as an Access Point

That's my $0.25 worth of advice...

dockmaster

join:2011-10-30
Pensacola, FL
I thought I saw some access points with more than one port. Dont
I saw this drawing after I posted. Thats exactly what I'm doing.
So I guess a dual band router router or access point for my second location. Do routers give more range?
thanks for the quick reply's
billd

HELLFIRE
Premium
join:2009-11-25
kudos:18

1 recommendation

reply to dockmaster
said by dockmaster:

Do routers give more range?

No. Wireless range is dependent on all the other usual variables associated with wireless : interference,
signal strength, building materials, # of other hosts on the same frequency, etc.

Your best bet is walk around the house with a laptop with netstumbler / inssider installed and pinging
to the 1st router in SoonerAl See Profile's diagram and seeing a) how good the signal strength is, and b) if
you're getting any ping loss.

My 00000010bits

Regards


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer, AB
reply to dockmaster
If your ultimate goal is superior WLAN range/speed, go with a proper AP. They can be in the ~200+ range but you won't regret it. I finally buckled and it and haven't looked back. Signal strength is far superior than an consumer grade router made into an AP, which I have tried before. All comes down to cost. If you don't mind paying, go with a biz AP, PoE is extremely nice as well. For me, my AP does nothing but provide wireless to a 2600sqft house, and I get good signal for a ways outside. I can get 2 bars on both phones at our mailbox which sits 150FT down the driveway.

Price is all it comes down to.


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
Hey rusty have you compared your results to the Netgear R6300 for example??


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer, AB
reply to dockmaster
I tried a couple d-link, cisco and asus. Haven't heard of anything good from netgear in a long time. Ended up with a DAP-2553. Works wonderfully! Been having issues with the device locking up every couple weeks, though. Tried a variety of firmware and still does it. It's running on PoE injectors now, plugged into an APC 2200 which feeds my main firewall and two hyper-v hosts. Doubt it's dirty power, but who knows, as bad power can cause strange issues. May have to send the device back if it continues. A quick reboot and it's running again, so it's more likely a lemon than actual low quality hardware. I have a thread in this forum regarding the device. Have yet to hear back from anyone regarding the firmware.


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
In my mind there should be no difference in AP performance from a dlink 2553 to a dlink router with the same hardware and antenna configuration. In fact many routers with tomato etc can bring the same AP business class software options to a router AP solution.

So I am not sold on business class APs for the home scenario. Homes typically do not need PoE or more essides than lets say the home one and one guest one. The new N technology does not necessarily provide longer ranges than older B technology but it does provide much better connectivity and throughput in the midrange.
--
Ain't nuthin but the blues! "Albert Collins".
Leave your troubles at the door! "Pepe Peregil" De Sevilla. Just Don't Wifi without WPA, "Yul Brenner"

LlamaWorks Equipment


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer, AB
reply to dockmaster
I've tried a variety of consumer grade. Didn't play much with custom firmware, though. I tried high omni-directional antennas with no difference. Actually, signal quality usually degraded once I put on higher gain antennas on most I tried. The price you will spend on 2 consumer grade routers made into an AP, you can get a proper AP that actually will provide better coverage. I was a firm believer I could do it with your over the counter routers converted to an AP only. At one point I had 4 placed in our house to get the desired coverage. Using roaming, it seemed to work alright. I noticed sometimes I would get stuck on the AP not closest to me, which sometimes made a difference depending on what I was doing, what device I was on, etc. Purchasing a business grade AP for the first time for home use, I am blown away. It's now running on injectors as well, so no more power. The coverage I am getting is better than my existing AP's and trials of various over the counter consumer grade, and speeds are more consistent and stable. Eliminated a pile of cabling in the house and overall extremely happy. Like I've stated, though, I'm having issues with it locking up every couple of weeks. Firmware hasn't fixed it, and I'm hoping somehow the injectors and my APC 2200 may fix the issue. Though dirty power most likely isn't the issue, I've seen bad power do stranger things.

To anyone who stumbles across the thread, if you want to play around and are more interested in the learning aspect, over the counter routers will work and you can get your desired coverage. If you are frustrated with your wireless network, buckle down and get the proper device. In the long run, I would have saved a pile of money getting the more expensive and proper AP, especially if you add in the cost of cabling and the hassle of fishing wire to multiple locations in a house. This single 2553 is doing better than my existing 4 - 655's which I mostly used. Only did trails with other devices and various dBi omni-directional antennas.

.02

meowmeow

join:2003-07-26
Helena, MT
reply to dockmaster
May I suggest the EnGenius EAP-600? Great little AP and PoE 802.1af and ceiling mount


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to dockmaster
Either an AP or wireless router should do the trick. Also Powerline is a viable option. For what you want I see no need to go to more expensive solutions.

I do recommend not going with a B/G solution, as someone else stated, you may not gain absolute distance, but your coverage should be more consistent within its range.
--
Deeds, not words

dockmaster

join:2011-10-30
Pensacola, FL
Is there an AP with more than 1 port. I'd like to hard-wire my wives computer with the existing cat5 cable that already goes to it (dont have to install a wireless card). Its not a money deal, just a cable will keep hers working and well...you should get the drift!!!!
Anything after the AP after that can be wireless. Seems to me most AP's have only one port. Thats kinda why I was on the router trail....they have a LAN port and 4 other ones.....
thanks
great bunch of info

billd


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
exactly why a router acting as solely an AP and switch is decent and viable option. Typically you get one wan port (not usually usuable in the above scenario) and four or five LAN ports (switch).


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
reply to Anav
said by Anav:

So I am not sold on business class APs for the home scenario.

I think the big difference between home and commercial is management and operation is dense environments using sectoring. Neither of which normally apply to a home user.

said by Anav:

The new N technology does not necessarily provide longer ranges than older B technology but it does provide much better connectivity and throughput in the midrange.

I can attest to that. I replaced an EnGenius b/g with an Netgear 802T v2. The AP is in a second floor closet and my office is in the basement. With the N AP get much better signal strength/speed, rock solid vs very finicky.

/tom