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peterman25

join:2008-06-19
Laveen, AZ

[AZ] Should I get a Tech for this?

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modemlvls
I noticed the other day that may modem power levels aren't so hot. Then again, I haven't noticed any problems with my internet connection. I had some poor TV issues as soon as the speed increase was rolled out. They have since corrected themselves. Is this worth a call to tech support? Thanks.


chrisf8657

join:2002-01-27
Glendale, AZ
Eek...yeah those are getting out of whack. The modem is "supposed" to be able to connect in a range of +15 to -15 but you start seeing problems well before that.

How many splitters do you have between your box and the modem? This is usually the first thing the techs on here will ask.

I'd suggest running thru some of the other threads here with people who had similar issues, you might find some solutions. If you can't though, yes, it's time for a tech visit.

I'm sure one of the techs or more cable-modem oriented forum goers will chime in.
--
~~Chris~~

Need a pro computer tech? See my profile for my website - I offer remote support services!

VentShop

join:2009-08-21
Oklahoma City, OK

1 recommendation

reply to peterman25
The closer to zero on the power levels the better. Check the connections and make sure all your cabling is good to your modem, maybe go as far as to take the modem outside with a long cat 5 and an extension cord and hook up outside removing all of the inside cabling from the equation. If the power levels are still off then I would call a tech out. If the power levels are good then start looking at removing splitters and upgrading cabling in your residence.

You can also drop a line direct to the modem from the outside and distribute to the rest of the home from there which will likely help your signal out as well. Even a pin hole in the sheathing that gets close to the core can cause issues in the lines.


CoxTech1
VIP
join:2002-04-25
Chesapeake, VA
kudos:79
reply to chrisf8657
FYI for bonded modems -10 to +10 is considered the acceptable window for downstream signal levels.

peterman25

join:2008-06-19
Laveen, AZ
So what you are saying is that I am right on the edge? That's how I see it. If it gets worse or if I see a degradation in my service I should proceed with a tech call? Thanks.


chrisf8657

join:2002-01-27
Glendale, AZ
reply to peterman25
CoxTech1 he's already over 11 on one channel...

peterman25

join:2008-06-19
Laveen, AZ
Interesting...Since my original posting all of the downstream power level numbers have gone up a point. Looks like I am making a phone call.

cmos100

join:2004-08-24
Lafayette, LA
Levels will vary some with temperature, the warmer it is out the more loss on the cable. The main line amplifiers have automatic level controls to compensate for it. The more your temperature swings the more you will notice it.

VentShop

join:2009-08-21
Oklahoma City, OK
reply to peterman25
As CoxTech1 said -10 to +10 is within limits. That being said those numbers can fluctuate greatly throughout the day due to many factors and if you are on the border and having things drop you may as well start monitoring and prepare to complain.

The systems will function from -15 to +15 but you will have a lot of errors. From -10 to +10 things generally do well but can have dropouts. Most install techs want to see numbers in the -5 to +5 to assure they do not have errors and have to come back out to fix a problem. The closer to ZERO the better. And if you are not happy start grabbing your logs as often as possible and save them or start posting them. You will also want to save multiple levels at different times throughout the day and if you are able to do so during an event that causes internet dropouts as well.

A good trouble shoot to see if the wiring in your home may be at fault is to get a two or three foot piece of coax and go to where the cable drops in your home and hook the modem up there with no splitters. Run a long cat5 and power cord or use a laptop and run a few tests, see what your levels look like there. If they are nearly identical to what you have inside the home then you can pretty well guess the wiring in your home is not causing a major issue. If the levels get drastically better go start buying some high quality splitters designed for digital cable systems and start swapping them out.

While the equipment the cable systems employ are designed to compensate for issues in line quality and temperature we all know those systems are not perfect and will let the values fluctuate within a given margin. Also those systems can stop functioning properly and cause the problems. Its nearly impossible to find someone who is willing to admit that their system may have a fault and repair it in a timely manner.