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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Draiman

Re: Low water pressure

said by Draiman:

If you really want to go that direction get the biggest unit you can. I mean if you want to spend $400 why not spend the extra $80 and be safe. You can't just return this type of item after a few months when you find out it's too small but on the other hand if it's too big it just doesn't have to work as hard making it last longer.
»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ecodZ···13h1QGSo

I like that thought process.

but so I understand, to run the unit you linked, I'd still need to upgrade the breaker, and the wiring running to it correct?
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
reply to onebadmofo

You said there are two of you? Just get a traditional 40 or 50 gallon electric water heater. Done. 100% efficient.

You (or the plumber) should check the wiring to ensure that the new heating elements don't exceed your wiring's capacity.


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

said by Draiman:

If you really want to go that direction get the biggest unit you can. I mean if you want to spend $400 why not spend the extra $80 and be safe. You can't just return this type of item after a few months when you find out it's too small but on the other hand if it's too big it just doesn't have to work as hard making it last longer.
»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ecodZ···13h1QGSo

I like that thought process.

but so I understand, to run the unit you linked, I'd still need to upgrade the breaker, and the wiring running to it correct?

Sure, of course; plus the incoming drop from the pole, possibly the electric meter pan and complete panel. Likely add another $1500 to the installation.

Get a regular 50 gallon tank and be done with it.


onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Draiman

said by Draiman:

This is the model I'd suggest to anyone needing electric heat.
»www.lowes.com/pd_386797-83-GEH50···cetInfo=

If money was no object...I'd go for it. But unfortunately my pockets are full of lint and my wallet is always running on empty.
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

said by Draiman:

If you really want to go that direction get the biggest unit you can. I mean if you want to spend $400 why not spend the extra $80 and be safe. You can't just return this type of item after a few months when you find out it's too small but on the other hand if it's too big it just doesn't have to work as hard making it last longer.
»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ecodZ···13h1QGSo

I like that thought process.

but so I understand, to run the unit you linked, I'd still need to upgrade the breaker, and the wiring running to it correct?

You'd need to do that with any whole house electric tankless system. Not many people have that type of extra service coming into their house unused.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

said by Draiman:

This is the model I'd suggest to anyone needing electric heat.
»www.lowes.com/pd_386797-83-GEH50···cetInfo=

If money was no object...I'd go for it. But unfortunately my pockets are full of lint and my wallet is always running on empty.

It shows you could get $600 off that water heater in rebates so $600 vs. $400-480.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to garys_2k

said by garys_2k:

said by onebadmofo:

said by Draiman:

If you really want to go that direction get the biggest unit you can. I mean if you want to spend $400 why not spend the extra $80 and be safe. You can't just return this type of item after a few months when you find out it's too small but on the other hand if it's too big it just doesn't have to work as hard making it last longer.
»www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-25ecodZ···13h1QGSo

I like that thought process.

but so I understand, to run the unit you linked, I'd still need to upgrade the breaker, and the wiring running to it correct?

Sure, of course; plus the incoming drop from the pole, possibly the electric meter pan and complete panel. Likely add another $1500 to the installation.

Get a regular 50 gallon tank and be done with it.

Huh?? Not sure what you mean about a panel. But if it would end up with that type of cost, shit...forget it.

Ooor re-reading that, maybe I didn't word that properly. I already have a breaker box. What I meant was, that I'd have to get new breakers and heavier wire coming from the break box to accommodate the higher demand from the new W/H.
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Draiman

said by Draiman:

said by onebadmofo:

said by Draiman:

This is the model I'd suggest to anyone needing electric heat.
»www.lowes.com/pd_386797-83-GEH50···cetInfo=

If money was no object...I'd go for it. But unfortunately my pockets are full of lint and my wallet is always running on empty.

It shows you could get $600 off that water heater in rebates so $600 vs. $400-480.

Good point.
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to onebadmofo

Do you know if you have 100a or 200a service? A typical house uses 60-80a so unless you have a 200a panel already you'd be looking at $1,500 to upgrade no matter if you went with a 75a or 112a system.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

Huh?? Not sure what you mean about a panel. But if it would end up with that type of cost, shit...forget it.

Ooor re-reading that, maybe I didn't word that properly. I already have a breaker box. What I meant was, that I'd have to get new breakers and heavier wire coming from the break box to accommodate the higher demand from the new W/H.

More likely an entirely new breaker box (panel) sized to your now-required 200A service. Putting a 100+ amp load onto your service is going to mean a lot of "upstream" stuff will likely need upgrading, too. Depending on who is responsible for the line from the pole to the meter you may be on the hook for that, as well as the "pan" (box) the electric meter mounts to, and the line from the meter to your breaker box. Usually the power company will swap your meter for free if you need one with more capacity.

This will cost you thousands of dollars, it's NOT worth it unless it either will give you some payback (this won't) or is needed because you're building on a big addtion to your house.

Your REALLY ought to just put in a new, regular, water heater. The installer should make sure your current breaker and the line to the heater is large enough, but that's usually easy to fix.


onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Draiman

aaah ok. I got ya. I'll check when I get home. But I think it's a 200 amp. But I'm probably wrong.
If it's not whats required for that type of WH...forget it, I'll just go with a regular water heater. Unless I can get a good deal on the GE one with a rebate.

Or maybe I can simply buy a dip tube for 4 bucks and save a ton of money. ...that is is basement ceiling clearance is good. sheesh....so many things to factor in.
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.



onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to garys_2k

said by garys_2k:

said by onebadmofo:

Huh?? Not sure what you mean about a panel. But if it would end up with that type of cost, shit...forget it.

Ooor re-reading that, maybe I didn't word that properly. I already have a breaker box. What I meant was, that I'd have to get new breakers and heavier wire coming from the break box to accommodate the higher demand from the new W/H.

More likely an entirely new breaker box (panel) sized to your now-required 200A service. Putting a 100+ amp load onto your service is going to mean a lot of "upstream" stuff will likely need upgrading, too. Depending on who is responsible for the line from the pole to the meter you may be on the hook for that, as well as the "pan" (box) the electric meter mounts to, and the line from the meter to your breaker box. Usually the power company will swap your meter for free if you need one with more capacity.

This will cost you thousands of dollars, it's NOT worth it unless it either will give you some payback (this won't) or is needed because you're building on a big addtion to your house.

Your REALLY ought to just put in a new, regular, water heater. The installer should make sure your current breaker and the line to the heater is large enough, but that's usually easy to fix.

Yeah I see your point. If all that work would need to be done, it's a no brainer on what road to take with it.
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10
underabridge
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

...that is is basement ceiling clearance is good. sheesh....so many things to factor in.

Just an idea but can you get some help? If you empty the tank, disconnect water and electric and tip it enough (with help) to get the new tube in, all you've spent is a couple bucks and some labor. You (or some contractor) will have to do all of this if you're going to replace the heater anyway.
--


Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to onebadmofo

And when you put it in, strap it to the wall. Cheap fix against it falling over in an Earthquake, which you occasionally have on the East Coast. Being electric at least it won't blow up if it fell I guess.

Electric, that must cost a bundle to heat up.
On the RV, due to the water hardness at some places I get the white calcification. As stated, put some in some vinegar and see what happens.

On a 1994 heater, the anode rod is likely also shot.
I had to replace mine on the RV after 5 years as it was just a stick and lots of calcification.


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey

1 recommendation

reply to Jim

His water heater is 20 years old.



onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Jim

said by Jim:

said by onebadmofo:

...that is is basement ceiling clearance is good. sheesh....so many things to factor in.

Just an idea but can you get some help? If you empty the tank, disconnect water and electric and tip it enough (with help) to get the new tube in, all you've spent is a couple bucks and some labor. You (or some contractor) will have to do all of this if you're going to replace the heater anyway.

Yeah I thought of that. But I wasn't sure if that would damage the unit some how. (ya know like some things shouldn't be turned on their sides)
--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10
underabridge

I wouldn't expect it to as long as you didn't lay it on it's side, roll it around on the floor or bounce it up and down. I'm pretty sure they are 'supposed' to be shipped upright but as long as you're careful...
It's still a pretty cheap fix. You can always spend the bigger money later.
--



dcurrey
Premium
join:2004-06-29
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·Cincinnati Bell
·ViaTalk
reply to onebadmofo

Another problem you might encounter trying to fix it is the bottom my be full of sediment. May or may not drain. Then you also face the possibility of drain valve leaking once done.

I am all for learning to try to fix stuff myself but be prepared to do full replacement.



onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to onebadmofo

Huh...looks like I have a 200 amp breaker?
Ok I'm not sure why but the site decided to place the pic on it's side and not upright. But what ever, you can still make out whats what.



--
Photoshop these nuts in your mouth.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:9
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET

The picture shows that you have a 200A breaker panel. This would mean that your service entry (power from utility to your panel) doesn't need to be upgraded if you were to install an electric tankless water heater (however that still doesn't make that a good idea). You would need new breakers and new wiring from the panel to the location of the tankless water heater if you were to take this path.

The picture also shows that you have a 30A breaker for your current water heater (that is typical). As long as your new water heater doesn't need more then 30A you can replace the water heater without any electrical upgrades.
This is your best (easiest, least costly) option.
--
Got some spare cpu cycles ? Join Team Helix or Team Starfire!



rockotman
...Blown On The Steel Breeze
Emerging Research
join:2000-08-06
DSotM
kudos:2
reply to onebadmofo

n/m - I should have finished reading the thread before posting.