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dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to JohnInSJ

Re: When your PC dies, so does your Office 2013 license

said by JohnInSJ:

Nope - not at all. You can decide what you want to do. If what you want to do isn't something Microsoft wants to sell you, then you do what you want to do with some other software.

I think that's a little unfair a characterization - this is surely a case of vendor lock-in. If I've got a couple of tonnes of existing Word documents going back to the 20th century, and my new employees need access to the same, then I might well feel compelled to buy whatever Office version MS will agree to sell me, under whatever terms they want.

i.e., they've already got me by the nuts and I can't really stop them squeezing.

Here's how I see it: the Office software is now mature enough that it does pretty much everything everyone needs, and the previous sales driver of "see new features, willingly upgrade" is no longer operational.

A switch to a subscription-based model seems like an honest way of confronting the issue. An underhand "full retail but tied to one PC forever" somehow smells of deceitful tactics. My PC is nothing to do with Microsoft. If I choose to build a new one every month (the bit-bucket fills up so rapidly these days), it's unclear to me why there's any moral grounds for saying I need to pay MS more money for the same thing because... well, because they want me to.

Well, there goes any chance I ever had of getting returned as an MS MVP...


Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Msradell

said by Msradell:

said by H2OuUp2:

The biggest reason I see about having the subscription is you always get the newest software for no extra charge, so if they come out with an Office 2014 you will get it no charge (only your yearly subscription.) Second what happens if you change jobs? All of a sudden you are in an environment that requires you to use the latest Office. You have been using something else, and now you are behind the 8 ball trying to catch up. Don't think this will happen?

This brings up an interesting point. Will you upgrade to the newest version of the automatic or will you have a choice? Many times you don't want to immediately upgrade to the newest version for various reasons. Some of them would be compatibility with the version you use at work, compatibility of certain programs or an extended learning curve. If the upgrade is automatic, as soon as it's available real problems could occur.

And that all raises yet another point: if a subscription model will automatically bump software versions and features at Microsoft's discretion, then business customers (large or small) lose their own ability to determine when to break in new software versions within their organizations. When planning for software updates, businesses must consider deployment impact and cost... things like re-training, inefficiency and customer-service disruptions until the learning curve is mastered, IT department overtime, system compatibility issues, etc, etc.

Imagine the chaos within a business if one Tuesday morning, all their Office software had been reverted from the "ribbon" back over to some new menu-tree format, or from the present panel layout to some Win8 metro-desktop-type work area format... and the software was only working on 2/3 of their systems. Now, obviously, major feature break-ins would likely be advance-announced by Microsoft, but a business would still be stuck with MS's break-in point, not their own. If they chose not to continue subscribing, their existing Office software would... what? It would no longer be legitimately licensed, with all the legal repercussions that implies. I really question how business will ultimately react to these MS nudges and shoves toward software subscription licensing...
--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by OZO:

I'll continue to use my old 2003 version or move to another alternatives.

Yep, this is an excellent example of the customer that Microsoft will loose due to this change. One that hasn't generate revenue in 9 years.

And why do you think that my mission is to generate revenue for that company?

I have different financial objectives and I buy a tool, when I need it, to achieve them. Wasting my money on something, just because this company wants to get revenue from me, is not one of them. If you think otherwise, you live in a world of some illusion, that has nothing to do with reality.
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by OZO:

said by JohnInSJ:

said by OZO:

I'll continue to use my old 2003 version or move to another alternatives.

Yep, this is an excellent example of the customer that Microsoft will loose due to this change. One that hasn't generate revenue in 9 years.

And why do you think that my mission is to generate revenue for that company?

I have different financial objectives and I buy a tool, when I need it, to achieve them. Wasting my money on something, just because this company wants to get revenue from me, is not one of them. If you think otherwise, you live in a world of some illusion, that has nothing to do with reality.

I don't think that at all. I think you are a non-issue for Microsoft. Go forth and enjoy your other options.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


chip89
Premium
join:2012-07-05
Independence, OH
reply to jmorlan

I don't like Microsoft office anyway I use Google Docs why pay for something you can get for free.


UmmaGumma

join:2011-06-19

Open Office and/or Libre Office work fine for anything I do.



Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4

You must not need excel and powerpoint.

I've used libra and it's awesome for word but powerpoint and excel are trash. I'd rather use google drive.
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.



Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to chip89

said by chip89:

I don't like Microsoft office anyway I use Google Docs why pay for something you can get for free.

skydrive gets you office for free as well.
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.


chip89
Premium
join:2012-07-05
Independence, OH

Which I don't get If why want you to pay for it in the first place I knew that though I have 25Gs of storage on skydrive.



J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
reply to jmorlan

So Microsoft is trying to be irrelevant? Why would they do this? Makes no sense!



Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to chip89

said by chip89:

Which I don't get If why want you to pay for it in the first place I knew that though I have 25Gs of storage on skydrive.

The online versions are fine for most people but if you're doing real work you really don't have a choice. I've tried making powerpoints in gdrive and libra office but it doesn't work.
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to J E F F

said by J E F F:

So Microsoft is trying to be irrelevant? Why would they do this? Makes no sense!

If you find there is a set of people who will not pay for your software, you offer them some reduced functionality in an ad-supported web portal. That way, you generate some income off them.

You find there is another set of people who need more than what the free software offers, and for those people you sell a product that offers more.

You address people who buy one copy and never upgrade by switching to a subscription model, since those people are (from an income standpoint) virtually indistinguishable from the ones who will not pay for your software.

It actually makes perfect sense.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

It does actually make a lot of sense from a sellers perspective (or rather a rent / lease perspective). For example, my cable company won't allow the customer to buy and own a cable box. This means in the 10 to 12 years or so that I've been a subscriber I've paid the value of the two cable boxes many times over in rental fees,.....and still don't own the boxes,.....

I'd have to take a look at Microsoft's model carefully to see how well it would work for me but I have no doubt that it works well for them.

I could see how this could work to push people off of older software though which is something Microsoft and other companies have wanted to do for some time.


UmmaGumma

join:2011-06-19
reply to Alcohol

said by Alcohol:

You must not need excel and powerpoint.

I've used libra and it's awesome for word but powerpoint and excel are trash.

Not for any business purpose.

I find the spreadsheet works fine for any home use I have though.

UmmaGumma

join:2011-06-19
reply to Octavean

said by Octavean:

It does actually make a lot of sense from a sellers perspective (or rather a rent / lease perspective).

It may be more practical from another angle. How many Office CDs do they package and ship that go unsold? They might believe they're reducing a lot of waste this way.


2kmaro
Think
Premium,ExMod 1 BC
join:2000-07-11
ColossalCave
kudos:1

Actually, if you look at some of the packaging for the 2013 'Click to Run' products (Office family of products) all that's included in the box is:
#1 - a card that says "go to this site ....." and enter the 25-character product key that is on the other card in this box.
#2 - a smaller card with the 25-character product key.

The box isn't even large enough to hold a CD/DVD. This all in turn pushes you to set up a "Live" account complete with SkyDrive where they keep a list of your purchased software for installation.

Now there is a way to force the installation to be completely set up on your local hard drive, but the default install is "click to run" meaning that if you use a feature not yet installed, you must be connected to the internet to get that feature to work at that time.

Yes, Microsoft is definitely focused on a "cloud" based model, and this leads to the Software/Storage as a Service annual "service fee", i.e. subscription fees to continue using your software and accessing your cloud stored data.

There are other issues involved with all of this that haven't been touched on yet - especially in the "cloud file storage" arena. Just one of which is where is your data physically stored? The actual physical location of the data center affects things like who can look at it - consider a data center located in a country such as China or Iran. Do you think U.S. or other tight privacy laws mean anything to those folks? Additional concerns for businesses or anyone storing sensitive information are security and backup of that data by the provider.

Ok, enough poking at the hornet's nest, must actually go earn my dollar-two-ninety-eight now.

Enjoy!
--
...then THINK! again.



captokita
Premium
join:2005-02-22
Calabash, NC
reply to jmorlan

So you buy a copy to test on your desktop, and you're then not allowed to put it on your laptop - even if you remove it from the desktop? That's baloney.

I've been testing Office 2013 Pro Plus from my companies MSDN sub, I would be really pissed if I bought a license for $400 to be told I can't move it to a new laptop/desktop when I needed to. I've had clients that insist on a new laptop every year because they can't afford to be down without it a day, much less two or more if something fails. This sort of thing wouldn't go well with them.

I'm not opposed to MS wanting to make money, as I can also accept them wanting to protect their software from piracy, but this looks to be something that would alienate your clients. At the least, would prevent them from upgrading.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

said by captokita:

So you buy a copy to test on your desktop, and you're then not allowed to put it on your laptop - even if you remove it from the desktop? That's baloney.

If that's what you want to do, then you select the subscription version which does not have this restriction.

Edit: actually, for $10 you can "test" the subscription version on 5 different devices for a month.

--
My place : »www.schettino.us