dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1313
share rss forum feed


aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

Anyone have IPv6 on Verzion Land Line?

I used »test-ipv6.com/ and I can have either:

#1 6to4..

OR

#2 6in4 Static..

..working on my DSL connection

Thanks.
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


lennoz

join:2008-12-04
Brooklyn, NY

I got 0/10 score.


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:1
reply to aefstoggaflm

Verizon doesn't support IPv6



aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

1 edit

said by guppy_fish:

Verizon doesn't support IPv6

#1 On Verizon's support site talking about IPv6 at

»www22.verizon.com/Support/Reside···8742.htm

a) It clearly says that

quote:
Where is IPv6 available?
Dual Stack IPv4/IPv6 will be launched in various areas within Verizon’s FiOS network, starting Later in 2012. Check back for more information.

and

quote:
What if I have High Speed Internet (DSL)?
Our DSL network is in the process of being upgraded for dual stack mode. Many of the same guidelines for FIOS will apply to DSL when we move to Dual Stack IPv4/IPv6 in regards to availability and customer equipment.

b) and yet here we are in the second month of 2013.

#2 So why do they not support it, yet?

Thanks
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.

mikev
Premium
join:2002-05-04
Leesburg, VA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon FiOS
·Callcentric

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to aefstoggaflm

Yeah, they missed that Q3 2012 date they set for Residential FiOS, and still don't have IPv6 working for us yet.

Firmware updates for at least two capable Actiontec models (MI424WR revisions G and I) have been available for ~2 months or so, but I haven't seen an IPv6 address show up on my router at home yet.

So they gave a date (and a general one at that) and it has passed without happening. Should this surprise me? Because it doesn't.

Reference for the Q3 2012 date:

quote:
Verizon is implementing these dual stack upgrades in its FiOS network, and the first upgrades will become available starting in 3Q12. The first phase will include Verizon FiOS customers who have a dynamic IP address.


aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

said by mikev:

Should this surprise me? Because it doesn't.

Please explain why you feel that way.

Thanks.
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.

mikev
Premium
join:2002-05-04
Leesburg, VA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon FiOS
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

said by aefstoggaflm:

said by mikev:

Should this surprise me? Because it doesn't.

Please explain why you feel that way.

Thanks.

Partly because it's Verizon.

But also partly because an implementation of IPv6 for millions of users across geographically diverse areas is no simple feat. First, they need to make sure that all of THEIR hardware is compatible. Routers, gateways, TV equipment, MDU equipment, etc. Anything that they monitor over their network to ensure everything is working properly also falls into that category. Anything that isn't needs to be upgraded, requiring procurement, configuration, and installation of new hardware, which of course needs to happen at times that impact we the end users the least (overnight).

Then they move onto end-user equipment. Millions of MDU's, ONT's, STB's, routers... firmware updates may need to be done for things that are capable of supporting IPv6... software development, testing, rollout... It takes time to do all of this properly. End-user items that aren't capable need to be replaced/upgraded. It's possible that replacement of end-user equipment could be delayed until after implementing IPv6 on the network, since IPv4 would still be running at the same time. But this also costs money, so they need to be ready to spend the money needed for new customer hardware to be installed.

And then there's the actual "flipping the switch". New configurations for the equipment that make IPv6 happen need to be tested and implemented. Technicians need to be on-hand and ready to resolve any issues that arise in order to ensure minimal downtime. Support staff need to also be able to handle calls/chat sessions if end-users do have problems. Oh, and they'll also probably need to go through training on this too.

Everything here costs money. New hardware... software development and rollout... configuration testing and implemtation... training of employees... extra hours/employees to maintain service levels. Verizon's focus on FiOS has been more on signing up new customers and getting existing customers to upgrade to more expensive services, in order to keep up the bottom line. So it wouldn't surprise me if they slowed down the IPv6 plans in order to save some money. But they wouldn't tell us about this, of course.

So with everything that needs to be done for this kind of implementation, it doesn't surprise me at all that they missed the date that they set.

It DOES surprise me that it still isn't implemented though, now almost 5 months after Q3 2012 ended.


DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

said by mikev:

It DOES surprise me that it still isn't implemented though, now almost 5 months after Q3 2012 ended.

One of my contacts inside says it is a complete fustercluck because of IPv4 devices in the mix that simply will not work. Yes, VZ could roll it out sooner if they could tell customers "fawgeddabowt any of your legacy v4 stuff...including pre-4.2 Android devices." Customers would not take that well.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

said by DC DSL:

said by mikev:

It DOES surprise me that it still isn't implemented though, now almost 5 months after Q3 2012 ended.

One of my contacts inside says it is a complete fustercluck because of IPv4 devices in the mix that simply will not work. Yes, VZ could roll it out sooner if they could tell customers "fawgeddabowt any of your legacy v4 stuff...including pre-4.2 Android devices." Customers would not take that well.

Tell those people who think that, clearly on »www22.verizon.com/Support/Reside···8742.htm it says
quote:
To best serve our customers during this time, Verizon is rolling out IPv6 address space in a "dual stack" mode – where IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are both loaded. The company will maintain IPv4 for those servers continuing to use that standard, and IPv6 for servers using this latest standard. The dual stack approach applies to both existing and new Verizon customers.

they don't need to turn off IPv4, yet. Geez...
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

You, of all people here, knows that what is posted for public consumption is for show and not necessarily what's actually happening on the ground. If v4 wifi printers, TVs, tablets or phones can't connect or work reliably, it's a show stopper. Yeah they could roll it out with the known issues but that will cost more to clean up after the fact than taking the extra time for a clean deployment. VZ does not want any large-scale problems tarnishing their premium product.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


mikev
Premium
join:2002-05-04
Leesburg, VA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon FiOS
·Callcentric

1 recommendation

reply to aefstoggaflm

The whole thing about running dual-stack is that legacy IPv4-only devices will continue to function, and routers will be able to provide both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses if they support both. This isn't just marketing speak, it's real.

Comcast has already implemented IPv6 in a dual-stack configuration for their high speed internet customers. You don't hear anything about peoples' network printers, internet music players, storage devices, and other products not working properly on their network, do you?

Also... Android has supported IPv6 for a while now. In fact, Verizon Wireless requires every LTE-capable device to support it. Verizon does have IPv6 fully operational on their LTE network. In fact, if you have a Verizon Wireless LTE phone, take its browser and go to »ipv6-test.com. You'll see both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. That's how dual stack works.



DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2

Comcast did quite a few things differently in their v6 deployment from how VZ is doing it (there was a writeup on here in the last year or so that described their approaches that pointed out that VZ was going to have problems). And, yes, there are quite a few problems with v4 devices that do not work correctly on Comcast's deployment. Mostly things that are more than 2 years old. Several of my neighbors can't use their wifi printers, cameras, older tablets and phones. Comcast finally told them they'll just have to connect the devices to their computers or buy new ones that are v6-rated.

VZ's also running into problems with older devices. LTE devices may not be affected but they still have astronomical numbers of customers with 3G-era (or older) devices that DO NOT conform to the "new" rules, nor can they be made compliant without some kind of updating by the manufacturer. Those users will be OOL if VZ doesn't figure out and fix whatever is they're doing wrong before they roll-out v6. Otherwise, they'll have a PR nightmare on their hands.

There's a subtle difference in the demographics between Comcast and VZ customers (at least in the markets where they compete). The Comcast customers tend to be more tech-savvy and more likely to just replace a device that is not compatible. VZ still has a tons of customers who are less technical and are harder to convince that it's time to just "get a new one." Hopefully, what they come up with for FiOS will also fit DSL when/if v6 lands there.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."



aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

1 recommendation

said by DC DSL:

Those users will be OOL if VZ doesn't figure out and fix whatever is they're doing wrong before they roll-out v6. Otherwise, they'll have a PR nightmare on their hands.

#1 It seems to me, unless I am missing something: You seem to think if Verizon were to deploy IPv6, then Verzon will shut down IPv4 then and there.

#2 And it time to get some stats on IPv4 only, IPv6 only and dual (IPv4 & IPv6) Stack.

I point to »networking.vutbr.cz/live-statistics/ where it clearly shows (today when I looked)

a) Out of at least 5,000,000 domains, for web (HTTP & HTTPS) 95.30% of the servers are IPv4 only (Dual Stack is 4.23% and the rest are IPv6 only).

b) Out of at least 5,000,000 domains, for Mail (SMTP) 87.9% of the servers are IPv4 only (Dual Stack is 12.15% and the rest are IPv6 only).

c) Out of at least 5,000,000 domains, for DNS (domain name) 76.92% of the servers are IPv4 only (Dual Stack is 23.08% and the rest are IPv6 only).


Stats for IPv4 only, IPv6 only, and dual (IPv4 & IPv6) stack


#3 Based upon those stats, it seems crazy/nuts to turn off IPv4. I sure would not...

^^
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

1 edit

1 recommendation

Agree, I can't see why an ISP would turn off IPv4 any time soon. They have the network up and running, they have their address allocation and as I think we are all painfully aware most users corporate and consumer alike are woefully unprepared for IPv6. There is no upside to turning off v4.

Public sites will do everything in their power to maintain a direct v4 presence so as to not limit their audience. There are lots of lower priority users out there that will be forced to give up their address so sites are able to maintain a v4 presence.

At some point as the ISP exhausts their IPv4 allocation they will have to tell new customers either 1) they are out of luck or 2) deploy one of the many ugly conversions strategies.

For my own use I just switched DSL providers and asked about IPv6 support hoping I could play with it. Answer was "not yet we'll let you know." The gear they provided does not even have IPv6 firmware support so I assume it will be quite a while down the road.

My web site is v4 only so I'm one of the other 95%.

I though the final RIR IPv4 allocation in Feb 2011 would have sped things up more then is has. In the US we are in better shape then other regions but that also means we will be able to procrastinate longer.

/tom
fixed typos