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FF4m3

@rr.com

Hiring Managers: "A good Linux-head is hard to find"

From VentureBeat:

A new report shows Linux experience is in greater demand — and, hiring managers say, harder to find — than in past years.

The 2013 Linux Jobs Report, released today by the Linux Foundation, surveyed 850 hiring managers and 2,600 Linus pros and found that Linux might be a good area of focus for aspiring techsters.

Dice’s annual salary survey shows that salaries for Linux folks are rising at double the rate of other tech salaries. Yet the number of practicing Linux pros seems to be dwindling.

Of course, with all that demand, currently employed Linux professionals are feeling like the belles of the ball, with 75 percent fielding cold calls from recruiters in the past six months. Linux pros told the foundation that when considering a move, they do take into account work-life balance (read: a normal, 40-hour work week would be nice) and work-from-home options, but the biggest pull is all about the Benjamins, i.e., extremely competitive salaries.

More at sites.


FF4m3

@rr.com

Re: Hiring Managers: "A good Linux-head is hard to find&quo

A few more details from The Register:

Just what's driving all this demand is a bit murky, but the top three reasons given by survey participants were company growth, overall increased use of Linux, and the migration of existing systems from legacy platforms to Linux.

The report found that the average salary for Linux professionals was $90,853 (£58,654). That's 6.2 per cent higher than the $85,619 (£55,274) average for tech professionals generally – and salaries for Linux-related jobs are climbing faster than those of other tech jobs, too.

The bar for "experienced" was actually fairly low, with 73 per cent of respondents looking for people with three to five years of Linux background, although some wanted six to nine years of experience.

Such intense demand for Linux skills doesn't seem lost on those with the requisite know-how. Of the Linux professionals surveyed, 56 per cent said they thought it would be "fairly easy" or "very easy" to switch jobs, and 35 per cent said they actually planned to do so in the coming year, compared to 20 per cent for US employees generally.

On the other hand, studies such as these are always grist for the mill of the ongoing US immigration debate, with many tech companies insisting that the only way to slake their thirst for qualified job applicants will be to open the country's borders to more foreign workers.

A bipartisan Senate bill proposed in January would raise the totally number of immigration visas offered to advanced graduates in science, technology, engineering, and math from 65,000 to 115,000 per year, and possibly to as many as 300,000 per year. Meanwhile, a second Senate bill floated on Wednesday, dubbed the "Startup Act 3.0", would create additional visas for foreign entrepreneurs.

Linux professionals might therefore be wise to start searching for their ideal gig sooner rather than later, since companies and politicians seem determined to swing the balance of power in the tech workforce back over to employers – one way or the other.



nwrickert
sand groper
Premium,MVM
join:2004-09-04
Geneva, IL
kudos:7
quote:
Just what's driving all this demand is a bit murky, ...
Perhaps Windows 8?


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA

1 recommendation

reply to FF4m3
said by FF4m3 :

A few more details from The Register:

Just what's driving all this demand is a bit murky, but the top three reasons given by survey participants were company growth, overall increased use of Linux, and the migration of existing systems from legacy platforms to Linux.

It's not murky in the bay area. If you're doing web services at internet scale (and what aspiring start up wouldn't be doing that?) you're running for the first N years on EC2. Then you break out and your third round of funding, you build your own data centers.

That's all Linux.

Google already hires all the engineers in the bay area. Most of those are Linux types.

Leaves a small pool of non-googlers. High demand. Much joy and job hopping ensues.

Windows 8 - not really a factor.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


sbconslt

join:2009-07-28
Los Angeles, CA

2 recommendations

reply to FF4m3
I feel like this article comes out every year.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19

1 recommendation

reply to FF4m3
The battle of the Unix has had many casualties as HP-UX, Solaris, AIX, etc., duked it out. In the end, the only reason half of those names exist is because they are on legacy hardware and are expensive and difficult to transition off of.

AIX (IBM) is still plugging forward with new hardware and new OS updates, but the shit is so expensive and you're stuck with their hardware.

Linux is significantly cheaper and people are finding out that Red Hat's support is phenomenal. The fact that it can run on any hardware architecture, has more public packages available, makes it a more and more appealing OS.

In the end, Linux is winning the Unix battle with a few other providers hanging in there, but I wouldn't bank on them over the next decade.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

1 recommendation

Solaris can run on x86 machines. Most of the servers we use are Solaris on x86 servers. There was some movement to move some stuff to Linux, especially our web servers, but unfortunately that effort died out.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
I don't think that Solaris or AIX will be able to keep up. The OS is more than what a single entity can provide. It is the sum of all its packages.

When I want to configure something on AIX that's outside of the box, like Samba, I have to recompile a much older version of the code and hope that it runs. When it failed to run, IBM support, after two weeks and flying a guy two timezones out determined that it was something to do with the version of the compiler, even though no errors really indicated it.

Of course, when I set up Samba on Linux, it was as simple as a yum (or apt-get) install. If I didn't have SELinux enabled, I probably would have never asked for Samba help earlier. But when I set it up on AIX, I couldn't even get the shit to compile. When I did, I was using a much older version.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
That's pretty much what we see. Our server admins work in a different building, so I'm not too close to the process, but they will spend forever getting the latest PHP installed on all environments, and the ability to find the resolution to compilation problems on the Internet isn't nearly as robust as searching for the same issues on Linux.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
That kind of shit can only work for so long.