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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

Boxing in ducts (soffits) - Is it just me or is it tricky?

My basement reno project is in the drywall phase, but I had to box in my HVAC ducts.

I wasted 2 days boxing in only 2 ducts.

Are there tricks or is it something that's always tricky? I gotta be honest to say that some of the places require multiple height changes and joist orientation changes.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

You know we want pics!



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

Click for full size
Click for full size
Click for full size
Pics: It happened

Too lazy to go take newer ones with my boxing issues, but you can see the trickiest duct in the first picture. It crosses in the middle of the room then splits into two against the wall.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
reply to alkizmo

Just build boxes around them.

Don't think of it as drywall pantyhose for the ducts.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.



ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
reply to alkizmo

Build a 2 x 2 frame around the ducts, screw it to the wall and the joists above. Then cover with drywall.

Don't forget to leave access panels where you might need access to a damper, etc.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to Cho Baka

said by Cho Baka:

Just build boxes around them.

Don't think of it as drywall pantyhose for the ducts.

The issue is getting the lumber hook up to the ceiling joists without wasting too much precious inches of width or height, and then making sure they are all square & level.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
Reviews:
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I guess my idea is to give up a few inches here and there for the privilege of maintaining straight and true lines.

If there are too many jigs and jogs it looks amateurish to me.
(Observation only, not a poke at you.)
--
The talented hawk speaks French.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

1 recommendation

said by Cho Baka:

If there are too many jigs and jogs it looks amateurish to me.

I think I know what you mean. Too many changes in heights or widths = weird. I'm just trying to keep things efficient in size since that duct in the first picture is very low, Barely 6 feet from floor to soffit.

Maybe it's because I'm exhausted. I've been pushing hard in the past week on this project since my family&kids are out of the country until next week. Well, actually it's more like the window closes on Wednesday night as I go to China to joint them on Thursday morning.

Tomorrow is a fresh day. I'll start up with coffee


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
reply to alkizmo

If you're concerned about clearance height, you can box the vents in with 1/4" or 1/2" particleboard instead of sheetrock. What I've seen some contractors do is just build a vertical frame of 2x2's to cover the sides of the ductwork, and establish a clear edge for the bottom, then close it up on the bottom with a 2x2 attached to the wall, and particle board nailed underneath. This allows you to be a fraction of an inch from the bottom of the ductwork. No frame needed under the duct. Mud and tape as usual.



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
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reply to alkizmo

I find it much easier to use steel studs instead of wood for boxing in pipes and ducts. No nailing and not a lot of force or pressure needed. They also give you a few more flexibility options you can't get with wood.
In fact, I can't really think of any good reason to use wood at all for basement framing. Door ways, maybe. That's about it.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


lutful
... of ideas
Premium
join:2005-06-16
Ottawa, ON
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo

Click for full size
Click for full size
Click for full size
Click for full size
looking in from furnace area
said by alkizmo:

Are there tricks or is it something that's always tricky? I gotta be honest to say that some of the places require multiple height changes and joist orientation changes.

The original owner of our home did a decent job (I think) of hiding all the ductwork and pipes in the finished area of the basement using both false ceiling panels and lightweight drywall panels.

I never though about this until your post, but here are some pictures. Maybe you will get ideas to get your job done quickly.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to nunya

said by nunya:

I find it much easier to use steel studs instead of wood for boxing in pipes and ducts. No nailing and not a lot of force or pressure needed. They also give you a few more flexibility options you can't get with wood.
In fact, I can't really think of any good reason to use wood at all for basement framing. Door ways, maybe. That's about it.

Well, I am using steel studs for the length rails as they are perfectly straight.

said by lutful:

The original owner of our home did a decent job (I think) of hiding all the ductwork and pipes in the finished area of the basement using both false ceiling panels and lightweight drywall panels.

I never though about this until your post, but here are some pictures. Maybe you will get ideas to get your job done quickly.

From your picture, I can see that a lot of space is wasted around the duct. I can easily do something like that but I don't want to do so since the duct itself is already a good 15 inches wide. So I'd end up with a 27 inch wide soffit (if not slightly larger).

Anyway, today is a new day, I'm on vacation, and I feel quite fresh

I should be done today and start work on mud&tape