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Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA

Chair Rail Transition Question

Click for full size
Hey Everyone! I have a question when it comes to chair rail transitions. In my foyer I am putting up chair rail and plane on putting in the squares between the chair rail and base board. I also plan on painting the entire chair rail down in baseboard white paint. My issue is how to solve the transition from foyer to great room. See my pictures attached.

Also any idea what kind of molding to use for the square? I cannot seem to find anything at HD or Lowes that would work.

Would I use the same molding that i create the squares and cut a end peice and cope it in on the top and bottom making an end peice.

Any help would be great!

Thanks,
Korro

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Can you post a pic of the effect you are trying to achieve?

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Korro
here is what i want to create. However when i get to the transition i have no idea what to do.


nightdesigns
Gone missing, back soon
Premium
join:2002-05-31
AZ
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
reply to Korro
Are you doing the square inlays too? If so, I think you could get away with a same piece of rail/trim going vertical to the floor. With white paint and the inlays, I think it would fit right in. Without the inlays it might look strange, but the white paint will help to separate it.

Other option is to end the railing in the corner (remove the last section)
--
This Space for Rent...

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
The trim should be mitered and go to the floor. It looks like you are trying for a fake wood paneled wall. It will look fake to anyone who knows what real ones look like. No offense intended, but it may help if you understand what you are trying to copy on the cheap. With a real paneled wall there are different thicknesses of wood with the trim making the transitions. In your case, you are just nailing trim on the wall to look like it was paneled.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
reply to Korro
Maybe a built-in bookcase could align with the end of the chair rail.

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Korro
Thanks guys! The hall way in the second picture is how mine will look when completed. It is the townhouse down the street from mine. I just did not know how to finish the transition area. And yes the squares are going in. Just cannot find the type of trim to make them at this point.

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to nightdesigns
So would you use a piece of chair rail to go vertical or the trim that I am using for the squares to square it off!


VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL
reply to Korro
There isn't enough in your original picture to get a feel for the space. Trying to make an open transition between those two spaces just feels wrong, the way you are suggesting breaking up the space. Flooring is one thing, breaking up a wall treatment is another issue. Can you give us another picture incorporating the great room and foyer area?

Robbin is correct, the look you are going for is called raised paneling. Done properly you are talking a fair amount of money as it is custom cabinetry work. The "square" is actually a wood panel shaped on a router table into a panel which is then fitted into a frame.



The second picture you posted is the cheap way of copying a raised panel, as robbin mentioned. This is accomplished usually by using a base cap moulding, to create the square, attached directly to existing drywall. You might want to consider taking the middle road and building a 1x frame and use some type of moulding inside your squares.



In this image it looks like instead of a traditional chair they took a piece of 1x stock, rounded over the edge with a router and then mitered this cap down at the end of the wall (where the arrows are). You could cap it with any chair you wished to though. To answer your last question, I would not miter your chair down to the floor. That would just look wrong.

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Korro
Click for full size
Click for full size
Here are a couple more pictures showing the space.

Also I understand that I am doing it the cheaper way...but I am not looking at spending 1000 bucks on this space!

Thanks all!


LU89
Jersey Devil
Premium
join:2003-05-24
@desk
kudos:1
reply to Korro
Click for full size
Similar situation in a friends home, this is how they finished it. The trim pieces they used were fancier but you get the idea.
--
"Sometimes the appropriate response to reality is to go insane."


VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL
reply to Korro
Click for full size
Second set of pictures are much better, thanks. My suggestion, look for base cap or ogee trim to make up your boxes. As for the transition I'd say KISS... since you want to paint from the chair down just use the paint to define the transition. Plumb down from the short point of the chair rail, using pencil make a fine line and cut that in with your white trim paint. If that doesn't float your boat you can always add something after the fact.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Korro
said by Korro:

Also I understand that I am doing it the cheaper way...but I am not looking at spending 1000 bucks on this space!

I wasn't suggesting that you do that. My point was that you should consider how traditional wood paneling is constructed to help figure out how to finish out yours. There are three main parts to raised paneling (all of which are missing on yours). They are stiles, rails, and panels. Just as with building a raised panel door, the stiles are the vertical pieces and the rails are horizontal with the two of them creating frames which the panels are inserted into. As a finishing step, with raised panel wainscoating there is trim that then finishes out the edges. What you need to do is find some trim or other piece that finishes out the end where a stile would be to pull off the look. I would probably experiment with several different ideas until I found something I could live with (actually I would have just done the real thing -- all it would have taken was a few sheets of 3/4" and 1/4" plywood and different trim from what you are using). Here are a few pics of paneling made using this method.

»www.mantelcraft.com/traditional-paneling/

Korro

join:2008-03-15
Pittsburgh, PA
reply to Korro
Thanks guys for all your help. Lu89 love the idea of the trim you put in...but that wall in 18 foot tall. Huge open foyer right there.

VioletVenom.....that is exactly what I was going to do anyway....But i thought how the heck to transition. After actually seeing it painted (Thanks for your photo shoping) it looks like I was worring for nothing.

Robbin - I get what your saying...trust me...i thought about it...

Thank you everyone! I now know what I need to do!

Thanks,
Korro


Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1
reply to Korro
I like LU89 idea perhaps get some with fluting as well.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to robbin
said by robbin:

The trim should be mitered and go to the floor.

This... ^

There is already a visual breakpoint due to the floor...take advantage of that.


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON

1 edit
reply to Korro
Click for full size
You could get another post like you have at the bottom of the railing, cut it in half (top to bottom), and put it up against the wall. It'll give some symmetry to the opening, and you aren't going all the way up to the ceiling.

You might even be able to get a half-post right from the store and avoid having to cut one.