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scooper

join:2000-07-11
Youngsville, NC
kudos:2
reply to Hall

Re: Electric Bill

+1 - I live in a rural county, where wells are common (even though the county has put in a waterlines past most houses) - plumbers here know about wells as well as the usual plumbing issues. I would imagine that a plumber that works mostly in Raleigh would not be as familar with well problems.

BTW - my pressure tank has a bladder for the water, and you have to manually maintain the air with a tire like valve. In my case, when the tank is empty - you want to set the empty tank pressure to 2 PSI below the point where your switch turns the pump on, and the tank needs to be large enough that the pump runs for at least 1 full minute before shutoff.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Hall

said by Hall:

Wouldn't that depend on where a plumber is based ? I mean, a plumber "in the city", you're right, may know little about wells, sump pumps, etc, but a plumber who is in more rural areas definitely could.

It's not so much whether have have the knowledge as it is if they are equipped to work on them. A well guy probably has most all necessary repair parts on his truck which makes the job quicker, more efficient, and therefore probably cheaper.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.



Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10
underabridge

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.
--


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Hall

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

You need specialized equipment to dig down 500+ feet for a well so of course there is people who only do wells. A standard plumber might handle well equipment but not the well itself.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Jim

said by Jim:

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.

might be legal or insurance issues too.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


hdman
Flt Rider
Premium
join:2003-11-25
Appleton, WI
Reviews:
·exede by ViaSat
reply to Archivis

The previous owner MAY have been paying an annualized sum broken across every month. I think they call that the "budget" program at my utility. Also, you may want to look into whether your provider has a "time-of-use" billing. I have electric water heat, dryer, appliances, and I pay a premium between 7am and 7pm, but I pay a small fraction per kwh from 7pm to 7am. So....I put in a highly rated 80 gall water heater, and ONLY heat the water during the low cost times. A good electric water heater will only lose 1% of its energy per hour. Then we don't dry clothes until after 7pm.

I would also look at your insulation, windows, etc. Borrow a thermal gun and check around for air leaks. Also, look at your roof. If there is snow on it, thats good. If it melts off, that means your heat is going thru the roof.

If you have a fireplace, only use it if it gets its combustion air from OUTSIDE. If it uses the inside air, dont use it at all.

Good luck
--
The proper way to break in a Harley: Grab a fist full of throttle, and ride it like you stole it!!!



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

I think your main issue is the electric baseboard heaters.

In the short term, you should turn them down, or completely off in areas not occupied, and then turn them back only when someone is in that area. So when you go to bed, turn down the heat in everywhere except the bedrooms you sleep in. That may be a bit of a pain doing manually (I'm assuming the controls are on the baseboard heaters) but probably not as much pain as paying an oversized electric bill. If you already have a programmable thermostat, just program it appropriately. This doesn't cost you any money.

The next step should be (if you not already have) installing programmable thermostat(s). This will cost you some money, but it shouldn't be too bad.

In the long term, you may want to switch over to heat pumps like these: »www.grainger.com/Grainger/ductle···t=subset and perhaps add some extra insulation and replace your windows with better ones.

As for insulation, I had good luck putting 1" .. 1.5" polyisocyanurate foam on the inside walls/ceilings, and then adding a layer of drywall on top of it, but depending on your house, other solutions may be more suitable and better.

The majority of heat pumps are in the $800 .. $3000 range, so they are not cheap, but they should pay off over time. Likewise, adding additional insulation/windows replacement may be a costly hassle initially, but they should pay off in the long run.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to AVD

said by AVD:

said by Jim:

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.

might be legal or insurance issues too.

In Virginia the well folks have to be licensed by the State Health Department. So it is different.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

In the short term, you should turn them down, or completely off in areas not occupied, and then turn them back only when someone is in that area. So when you go to bed, turn down the heat in everywhere except the bedrooms you sleep in. That may be a bit of a pain doing manually (I'm assuming the controls are on the baseboard heaters) but probably not as much pain as paying an oversized electric bill. If you already have a programmable thermostat, just program it appropriately. This doesn't cost you any money.

This is exactly what we've been doing since we started this thread. I should go check my electric online, but I guess PPL Electric is down for maintenance for a few hours.

The next step should be (if you not already have) installing programmable thermostat(s). This will cost you some money, but it shouldn't be too bad.

We thought about it, but is it worth it if we're going to switch over to a heat pump?

In the long term, you may want to switch over to heat pumps like these: »www.grainger.com/Grainger/ductle···t=subset and perhaps add some extra insulation and replace your windows with better ones.

I'm looking into the insulation now. Our windows seem to be pretty modern. They're Anderson windows. Not sure how that holds up. We have an outdoor AC unit. I could replace it with a heat pump, do little duct work and have a heat pump unit.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02

Need to confirm with PPL but the home warranty guy came out and replaced the refriderator parts that went bad. After talking wtih the electrian that came out today too to check on the baseboard heaters to make sure they were working ok, he seemed to think that it was most likely a combination of the fridge constantly trying to start up and the dryer having to run more times than normal that caused the high pull of electricity. He tested the dryer and the one heating element is out so that causes the loads to almost need to be dried twice to get dry.
--
»Re: [game] Crazy Game - The Resurrection - Day 2
Corrupt Politician - tmodelt
You may privately message the rest of the mafia: ekster, Rook008 & Kristopher. You win with the mafia.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

said by aurgathor:

The next step should be (if you not already have) installing programmable thermostat(s). This will cost you some money, but it shouldn't be too bad.

We thought about it, but is it worth it if we're going to switch over to a heat pump?


It will still worth to have even with a central heat pump, although controlling individual areas will be much harder. If you were to opt for separate heat pumps (looks like you won't though) then they would be must haves.

I'm looking into the insulation now. Our windows seem to be pretty modern. They're Anderson windows. Not sure how that holds up.

Obviously, before doing any of these you need to examine what you have, how good they are, and how much better you can make it at what cost.

Adding an extra layer to the attic is usually fairly straightforward and doesn't involve a whole lot. Adding extra insulation to the walls will usually be much more of a hassle.
--
Wacky Races 2012!

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1

The problem of setting up a home zone control system is simple with a series of dampers and a zone control board as shown on this website:

»xcizoning.com/

I saw a zone control system as is described demonstrated at a home show. The demonstration system used a 60,000BTU central AC where three separate AC unit would have been required to meet the requirements of the architect. The system allows the temperature of areas or individual rooms to be controlled with dampers controlling the air flow to the controlled areas. A thermostat is installed in each climate controlled room or area.


TomS

join:2008-01-21
Gloucester, MA
reply to Archivis

>>> "When we bought the home, the previous resident said her average bill was in the upper $100's. I won't be able to call the electric company until Monday."

Sorry if I missed it, but what did PPL say? Were you able to obtain previous usage info?



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19

My wife called. If I recall correctly, the previous owner's highest month was in the mid 200's.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

said by Archivis:

My wife called. If I recall correctly, the previous owner's highest month was in the mid 200's.

Maybe the previous owner practiced what I would call is 'selective heating'.

I have 3 rooms, all with with electric heat, and unless I have visitors, I stay in, and heat only the smallest one, and occasionally the bathroom when I shave or take a shower.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Mr Matt

said by Mr Matt:

The problem of setting up a home zone control system is simple with a series of dampers and a zone control board as shown on this website:

Never heard of them before, but I guess in this case it's much easier to set up zones than I thought. Although since I don't see prices on their website, that leads me to believe that their system may be rather expensive.

Did they mention prices in that home show?
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to aurgathor

We've cut our usage in half by shutting stuff down. The electric company gives us readouts on a 2-day delay. We're already seeing our usage cut in half.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

It is also much warmer now, so you should be seeing a reduction.


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

The point that the zone control manufacturer was making was that the zone control system allowed the architect to specify one 60,000 BTU central AC rather than three smaller central AC's to meet the architect's requirements. I should have mentioned that I saw the demonstration system before the 2007 recession. I am sure that two additional smaller central AC systems cost many $$$. The other point that was made was lower maintenance cost of only one system.



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

said by Mr Matt:

The point that the zone control manufacturer was making was that the zone control system allowed the architect to specify one 60,000 BTU central AC rather than three smaller central AC's to meet the architect's requirements. I should have mentioned that I saw the demonstration system before the 2007 recession. I am sure that two additional smaller central AC systems cost many $$$. The other point that was made was lower maintenance cost of only one system.

also single point of failure.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--