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lutful
... of ideas
Premium
join:2005-06-16
Ottawa, ON
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

Re: Electric Bill

said by Archivis:

I did some work with my well pump and I know it's not running unless there's some usage. Sounds like I really have to curb my usage.

You should accept that maybe 75% of those 5000+ kWh were burned up in your baseboard heaters and water heater.

These steps will immediately lower your energy consumption:

1. Use low speed ceiling fans to move the hot air near ceilings down towards people.

2. Turn down the water temp, check for hot water leaks, and maybe consider buying a better thermal blanket.

3. You could replace some of the baseboard heaters with infrared heaters. They use a lot less power to give people/pets the exact same fuzzy warm feeling.

4. Keep dryer free of lint and use a flex metal duct connected to plastic exhaust vent. That way you use a bit less power and some of the heat stays in the basement.

5. Bake less ; boil less ; stir-fry more.


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to Archivis

I lived in an all electric house with well pump for 13 years. The heated area was only in the 1200 sq/ft range and 13 years ago I could get close to a $400 bill. I would suggest shutting doors to any rooms without water running through them or the attached walls and turning off the heat unless you are using the room. This can save a fair amount of money.

Your well pump should not run all the time when you are running water. If this is happening then you have a problem. Somewhere in your water system should be a pressure tank that will minimize how often the well pump cycles. These tanks go bad and lose pressure. Some have a sealed bladder and some of the older ones you fill up with air when they run low. Those will have a valve on them that looks like a tire fill valve. The tanks don't last very long and neither will your very expensive well pump if it is constantly working when you demand water. If you are taking a shower, you should only hear your pump kick in a few times during the shower.



J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
reply to Archivis

That sucks because your bill is high because of the baseboard heating. I had it once....once. It was a rental (duplex) and about $400/month in the winter. (otherwise about $50 or so in spring/fall and $120 in the summer)

Insulation should be checked out as well.

You might consider converted to oil or propane if you can't get NG.
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to lutful

Thanks for the advice. I did take apart the dryer setup over the weekend and it looks like those things are in place. The hot water heater is new and I have a catch pan and it's dry. I'll just try and keep my consumption lower.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to J E F F

said by J E F F:

You might consider converted to oil or propane if you can't get NG.

I'll certainly be checking into propane.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK


spinn

@tmodns.net
reply to Archivis

you had a good idea. have someomr switch off eachj breaker while you watch the spin. know which breakers are for the water heater n heaters. you are looking fir something. thats on all the time when it shouldnt be

another way to do that is to switch off ALL the subbreakers at once then switcj tjem on again one at a time then off while watching the spin

check too that they read the meter. sometimrs they just use tje same month of the prior year and rebill that



nonamesleft

join:2011-11-07
Manitowoc, WI
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Callcentric
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

said by IowaCowboy:

If your bill is that high, you might want to see if you qualify for any discounts/assistance. You could also look into budget billing where they average out a year's worth of bills into equal installments. If you own the house, you could look into converting to a cheaper source of heating or upgrading appliances. If you rent, either talk to the landlord about upgrading appliances or put in your 30 days notice that you are moving.

I just moved in here under a home purchase, not a rental. I'm not going to quality for anything under my income.

One last note, if the refrigerator is more than 10 years old, replace it. An old refrigerator will shoot an electric bill through the roof.

Let me try shutting that off real quick.

An old refrigerator is fine, its once the inside temperatures of the house start rising in summer where those older fridges really suck up power. My fridge is older and it uses about 75 kwh in the colder months, it can use up to 200 when temps get up to 76 or higher in the house in summer.

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
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·Comcast
·CenturyLink

1 edit
reply to Archivis

If you choose propane, buy the largest tank you can afford so you can use any local supplier otherwise you are married to the supplier that you are leasing your tank from.

Edit: If you own your tank you can purchase propane when prices are lowest in your area. If you know anyone in your area that uses propane ask them what they are paying per gallon. Propane prices can vary dramatically depending on your location.

Check out this website, members compare propane prices:

»www.checkpropaneprices.com/

Check out fuel oil with a local supplier, there is some special exemption when installing underground fuel tanks if the purpose is home heating.


Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota

1 recommendation

reply to Archivis

The page linked below show the heat content of various heat sources. Locally, as I type this, electric resistance heat is less expensive than a propane 94% efficient furnace.

Local winter electric rate $0.09/Kwh all taxes, fees, unfees, surcharges, taxes on the surcharges, and taxes on the taxes on the unfees included.

$2.55 per gallon of propane delivered (100 gallon minimum - customer owned tank)

91300 btu/gal * 0.94 = 85822 usable btu/gal
1 Kwh of electricity = 3413 btu/hr
85822/3413 = 25.15 Kwh per gallon of propane

Soooo....

85,822 Btu runs $2.55 using propane or $2.26 using electric resistance (baseboard, strip heaters, etc)

From the sounds of your situation, I'm thinking a heatpump with propane backup.

Of course, since fuel prices and electric rates seem to vary quite drastically from region to region YMMV!

»www.engineeringtoolbox.com/energ···868.html
--
Zach



Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to Archivis

Thanks a lot, everyone. I need to scramble to build up my cash flow again. I pumped a lot into this place.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
reply to Zach1

Damn. Propane is expensive there. Here it is $1.75 / gal delivered. That's the price last week. It's been dropping as the mild winter comes to a close.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.



J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..

1 edit
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

said by J E F F:

You might consider converted to oil or propane if you can't get NG.

I'll certainly be checking into propane.

As some have pointed out, depending on electrical vs propane rates, the savings might not be huge.

Here are a couple tips when it comes to electrical baseboards:

Make sure heaters are at least 3/4 of an inch off of the ground (that includes being 3/4 of an inch off of a carpet) and clean them and make sure they're free of dust. Any dust on them will ruin any efficiency.

For other tips, check this out.

»www.bchydro.com/etc/medialib/int···ters.pdf

I'll add that while electrical baseboard might be 100% efficient in converting to heat, I'm not sure how efficient they'd be compared to forced air when actually used in practice of heating a room. I'd imagine that there is a lot of loss with electrical baseboards that lose heat to the wall itself, and then outside, vs forced air that moves air around in the house. Just how much "BTU's" you lose in any given house is anyones guess, you'd need an energy audit to figure that one out.

--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to Archivis

As said before, your usage is normal.
I have a 2350 sqft house, average insulation and I use about 2300kWh/month with heat pumps - which on average use 35-40% of what resistive heat uses for the same amount of heat. Also oil-fired HWH here, so I'm not using electric for that.
If you have central A/C consider seriously switching to heat pumps, do your math for payoff based on reducing the heating-related costs by 60-65%...



warwick

join:2009-06-05
Hollywood, FL
reply to Archivis

Sheesh you guys have it good.

Here is a power analysis I recently did for a client.
(Newly installed pv system)
This is without the r.o system on

**************************************************

Assumptions:

6 Hours of usable sunlight.
Average Monthly kwh usage of 7869 kwh

PV Output of 5652 Watts

Solar Produced kwh per day 39.024
Solar Produced kwh per month 1170.72
Cost Savings at 0.4135 kwh 484.09272 -13.29%
Yearly savings $5809.11264

Important Values.

Average kwh per month: 8,800
Average kwh per day: 293.3333333
Watts consumed per hour: 7040

Average Costs per month: $3,640
Average cost per kwh: $0.41


power

@optonline.net
reply to Archivis

.

Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
reply to Archivis

In most homes I purchased I took advantage of a free home energy audit. Most of the reports listed the improvements that I could make, the budgetary cost and the payback period. You can use that information to determine whether or not to make any or all of the recommended improvements. One of the best investments unless your home is already well insulated is additional insulation. This is the best time to do a thermal camera inspection. It will show the areas where you are losing the most heat.

In my current home, which has an energy star rating, I asked the power company for anything I could do to reduce energy consumption. They had already done energy audits on other homes in my neighborhood. Without inspecting my home they recommended that I add a radiant barrier and offered to pay 50% of the cost through a government program.

I added the radiant barrier and lowered my electric bill from 20% to 25% the five summer months. The best way to describe the results of adding a radiant barrier is adding to the comfort level by making it seem like the sky is overcast and raining every day even when the sky is clear and the roof is being struck by direct sunlight. It was like I added another 12,000 BTU capacity to each central air conditioner. In your area additional insulation might do the same thing.



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02

I contacted the electric company, and they said a Home Energy Audit would be $350-$650, with them providing a $250 rebate if we choose one of their vendors.

Where do you get free audits?



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

Some states have legislation mandating "free" energy audits. In those cases they're not actually altogether free, utility ratepayers cover the associated costs through a small billing line energy conservation/ renewable energy surcharge that's tacked on.

Call your public utilities commission to see what is available to you.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~



Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Archivis

One way to figure out where all your power is going is a TED.
»www.theenergydetective.com/

You can calculate the power cost per circuit then turn stuff off on that circuit and see how much each item costs to run. You can enter your kWh cost into the unit and see how much electricity you've spend for the month and on a daily basis. One great way to save money is to add more insulation to the house.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
reply to Antonica

Check with your states Public Service Commission. Find out what the rules are regarding charging for home energy audits. You will find the toll free number of the PSC in the front of your telephone directory or the Pennsylvania State website. The reason the local power company serving my home, offered to pay for part of the radiant barrier installation, was at the time the EPA was offering financial incentive to conserve energy.



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02

Our state website has information on programs and other things that have been suggested here. Thank you. I'll continue to follow up with them to see what else we can do.


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink

Check this video on YouTube showing a thermal energy audit:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTggTbkA8MA


This video is more complete:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXPXE0qsmjg


Here is a demonstration of what was learned using a thermal imaging camera:

»www.youtube.com/watch?feature=en···GHU&NR=1


Gershom 1624

@optonline.net
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

I'm looking at $650 for an electric bill.

I'm in the northeast and use Oil heat.

While my electric bill was just $100, my heating oil is running about $600 a month during this winter....

And my medium-size one-floor house is pretty well insulated, double windows, thermostat set at 65-68, etc.

So it's adding up to the same thing.

jp16

join:2010-05-04
united state
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to Archivis

2nd the shutting off each circuit at a time. My parents have a well and pump. One month their bill was huge. The disk on the meter was spinning real fast. After shutting off the pump it all but stopped. Turned out that a joint in the pvc pipe broke and the pump could not satisfy the pressure requirement and ran constantly.



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

Consider using a mattress heating pad for each bed and keeping the rooms cold until wake up time.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by AVD:

Consider using a mattress heating pad for each bed and keeping the rooms cold until wake up time.

Check local rates and for time-of-use metering. The whole does-temperature-setback-save-you-money debate has been beaten to death here, but if the waking hours are not considered an off-peak rate, you may be losing a lot of the savings from doing the setback just during the recovery period.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

if his single electric meter has a spinning disk, it probably is not a time-of-use rate.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by AVD:

if his single electric meter has a spinning disk, it probably is not a time-of-use rate.

Doh. Missed that part. Probably doesn't apply here then in that case, but for others it still might.


Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
reply to jp16

said by jp16:

2nd the shutting off each circuit at a time. My parents have a well and pump. One month their bill was huge. The disk on the meter was spinning real fast. After shutting off the pump it all but stopped. Turned out that a joint in the pvc pipe broke and the pump could not satisfy the pressure requirement and ran constantly.

I'll try to make sure he does this tonight. I only bring it up because we've been having water pressure issues since we moved in, that weren't there before (when we first saw the house and during the house inspection by a certified inspector).
--
»Re: [game] Crazy Game - The Resurrection - Day 2
Corrupt Politician - tmodelt
You may privately message the rest of the mafia: ekster, Rook008 & Kristopher. You win with the mafia.


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10

Arch mentioned earlier that the pump only ran when there was demand. Do you know if it is a deep or shallow well? Is it a jet or submersible pump? Can you be a little more specific as far as what you mean by 'water pressure issues'?
--