dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
7067
share rss forum feed


Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1
reply to Mr Matt

Re: Electric Bill

Our state website has information on programs and other things that have been suggested here. Thank you. I'll continue to follow up with them to see what else we can do.


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink

Check this video on YouTube showing a thermal energy audit:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTggTbkA8MA


This video is more complete:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXPXE0qsmjg


Here is a demonstration of what was learned using a thermal imaging camera:

»www.youtube.com/watch?feature=en···GHU&NR=1


Gershom 1624

@optonline.net
reply to Archivis

said by Archivis:

I'm looking at $650 for an electric bill.

I'm in the northeast and use Oil heat.

While my electric bill was just $100, my heating oil is running about $600 a month during this winter....

And my medium-size one-floor house is pretty well insulated, double windows, thermostat set at 65-68, etc.

So it's adding up to the same thing.

jp16

join:2010-05-04
united state
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to Archivis

2nd the shutting off each circuit at a time. My parents have a well and pump. One month their bill was huge. The disk on the meter was spinning real fast. After shutting off the pump it all but stopped. Turned out that a joint in the pvc pipe broke and the pump could not satisfy the pressure requirement and ran constantly.



AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

Consider using a mattress heating pad for each bed and keeping the rooms cold until wake up time.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by AVD:

Consider using a mattress heating pad for each bed and keeping the rooms cold until wake up time.

Check local rates and for time-of-use metering. The whole does-temperature-setback-save-you-money debate has been beaten to death here, but if the waking hours are not considered an off-peak rate, you may be losing a lot of the savings from doing the setback just during the recovery period.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

if his single electric meter has a spinning disk, it probably is not a time-of-use rate.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by AVD:

if his single electric meter has a spinning disk, it probably is not a time-of-use rate.

Doh. Missed that part. Probably doesn't apply here then in that case, but for others it still might.


Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1
reply to jp16

said by jp16:

2nd the shutting off each circuit at a time. My parents have a well and pump. One month their bill was huge. The disk on the meter was spinning real fast. After shutting off the pump it all but stopped. Turned out that a joint in the pvc pipe broke and the pump could not satisfy the pressure requirement and ran constantly.

I'll try to make sure he does this tonight. I only bring it up because we've been having water pressure issues since we moved in, that weren't there before (when we first saw the house and during the house inspection by a certified inspector).
--
»Re: [game] Crazy Game - The Resurrection - Day 2
Corrupt Politician - tmodelt
You may privately message the rest of the mafia: ekster, Rook008 & Kristopher. You win with the mafia.


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10

Arch mentioned earlier that the pump only ran when there was demand. Do you know if it is a deep or shallow well? Is it a jet or submersible pump? Can you be a little more specific as far as what you mean by 'water pressure issues'?
--



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1

I don't know anything about the well pump except it was hit by lightning a few years ago and replaced with a newer pump.

Regardless of what faucet you turn on, they all have the water spitting out of them, instead of flowing.



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1

and the blue tank in the basement makes noise :P



Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10

Water 'spitting' out of faucets could just be dirty aerators at the faucets. On the other hand, it could be more serious. Does it stop eventually or is it all the time the faucet is on? As far as the blue tank, do you know if it is part of a filter/softener system or if it's the well pressure tank? Is it tall and thin (filter/softener) or short and relatively large around (pressure tank)? What noise?

I apologize if I disappear. The weather is deteriorating rapidly here and I'm probably going to head home. It's a haul.
--



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1

It's spitting all the time, every faucet (and we cleaned out the aerators in most of the faucets because they had this brown/rust like grime on them). There is a water softener system that was purchased 2 years ago and installed (Culligan). The Blue tank we're told is the well tank so I'm assuming its the well pressure tank. It's shorter and fat. Clicking noise, like a couple times in a row, then some pauses, then can click a few more times. No rhythm or anything to the clicking noise.
--
»Re: [game] Crazy Game - The Resurrection - Day 2
Corrupt Politician - tmodelt
You may privately message the rest of the mafia: ekster, Rook008 & Kristopher. You win with the mafia.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

The clicking at the pressure tank is probably the pump pressure switch turning pump on and off in response to water use. There should be a pressure gauge that you can watch to confirm pressure switch operation. One caution is that it might be plugged up so will not read properly.

If no one is using water and the pump is constantly cycling you have a leak either in the house or perhaps the check valve in the pump.

Since you have already dealt with the aerators spitting is probably air in the system. That normally only occurs if water is turned off and the system drained or partially drained. We have a submersible pump so pretty much impossible for air to get into the system. I'm not familiar with jet pumps.

Check if the pump is cycling unnecessarily. That indicates a leak, incorrect bladder pressure in the pressure tank or a waterlogged pressure tank. None of these problems explain air in the system - but needs to be taken care or right away.

Did the spitting just start? You can try turning on each faucet for a while to try and get the air out of the system. If that does not resolve the issue my guess is you have a jet pump and somehow air is getting into the system. I'll leave that to the plumbings professionals that frequent this forum.

/tom


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

2 recommendations

reply to Antonica

Why don't you start a new thread regarding your water pressure issues. This doesn't have anything to do with the current topic and many of us who can help won't see it buried in this thread. When you do, post some pics -- the blue tank and connected plumbing and anything else that you know of which is part of your well.



Antonica
Premium
join:2002-09-02
kudos:1

@robbin - This is some-what related as it was brought up by another member that the well pump could be part of the electrical issue if it was constantly running. This is my thread as well as Archivis is my husband, so all this is in reference to the same house.

The clicking noise that "I" have noticed is only when water is being used (toilet flushing, etc). I haven't heard it run other times so I assume again, the well pump is not running constantly. As for the air, we've tried to bleed the pipes for 15 minutes with every faucet turned on, still does the spitting. I will take robbins advice and that can be another thread or just dropped all together for now until the plumber comes out, but just wanted to clarify that I don't believe the well pump is constantly running. (Plumber will be asked to check that too).
--
»Re: [game] Crazy Game - The Resurrection - Day 2
Corrupt Politician - tmodelt
You may privately message the rest of the mafia: ekster, Rook008 & Kristopher. You win with the mafia.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I wouldn't call a plumber unless you have other plumbing problems. Most of them don't have experience with wells.



Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

Wouldn't that depend on where a plumber is based ? I mean, a plumber "in the city", you're right, may know little about wells, sump pumps, etc, but a plumber who is in more rural areas definitely could.


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
reply to Antonica

Sounds like you have a bad air volume control. My parents submersible pumps pressure tank had a valve (air volume control) about 2/3 of the way up from the bottom of the tank. Every so often the air volume control would begin hissing. The way the system worked there was a check valve at the tank that prevented back flow when the pump was not running. The check valve also included a vent valve on the well side of the check valve to allow the water in the line between the pressure tank and the well to drain back into the well to keep it from freezing in cold weather. Whenever the pump started the air in the line was injected into the pressure tank as well as the water pumped in. The air helped maintain pressure in the system. When the water in the tank dropped below the float valve the air volume control released excessive air in the tank. Whenever the air volume control failed closed they experienced the same problem you are experiencing, air coming out of the faucets. The plumber replaced the air volume control to fix the problem.


scooper

join:2000-07-11
Youngsville, NC
kudos:2
reply to Hall

+1 - I live in a rural county, where wells are common (even though the county has put in a waterlines past most houses) - plumbers here know about wells as well as the usual plumbing issues. I would imagine that a plumber that works mostly in Raleigh would not be as familar with well problems.

BTW - my pressure tank has a bladder for the water, and you have to manually maintain the air with a tire like valve. In my case, when the tank is empty - you want to set the empty tank pressure to 2 PSI below the point where your switch turns the pump on, and the tank needs to be large enough that the pump runs for at least 1 full minute before shutoff.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Hall

said by Hall:

Wouldn't that depend on where a plumber is based ? I mean, a plumber "in the city", you're right, may know little about wells, sump pumps, etc, but a plumber who is in more rural areas definitely could.

It's not so much whether have have the knowledge as it is if they are equipped to work on them. A well guy probably has most all necessary repair parts on his truck which makes the job quicker, more efficient, and therefore probably cheaper.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.



Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.
--


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Hall

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

You need specialized equipment to dig down 500+ feet for a well so of course there is people who only do wells. A standard plumber might handle well equipment but not the well itself.
--
What we're saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you're part of the problem. - E. Cleaver 1968


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Jim

said by Jim:

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.

might be legal or insurance issues too.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


hdman
Flt Rider
Premium
join:2003-11-25
Appleton, WI
Reviews:
·exede by ViaSat
reply to Archivis

The previous owner MAY have been paying an annualized sum broken across every month. I think they call that the "budget" program at my utility. Also, you may want to look into whether your provider has a "time-of-use" billing. I have electric water heat, dryer, appliances, and I pay a premium between 7am and 7pm, but I pay a small fraction per kwh from 7pm to 7am. So....I put in a highly rated 80 gall water heater, and ONLY heat the water during the low cost times. A good electric water heater will only lose 1% of its energy per hour. Then we don't dry clothes until after 7pm.

I would also look at your insulation, windows, etc. Borrow a thermal gun and check around for air leaks. Also, look at your roof. If there is snow on it, thats good. If it melts off, that means your heat is going thru the roof.

If you have a fireplace, only use it if it gets its combustion air from OUTSIDE. If it uses the inside air, dont use it at all.

Good luck
--
The proper way to break in a Harley: Grab a fist full of throttle, and ride it like you stole it!!!



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Archivis

I think your main issue is the electric baseboard heaters.

In the short term, you should turn them down, or completely off in areas not occupied, and then turn them back only when someone is in that area. So when you go to bed, turn down the heat in everywhere except the bedrooms you sleep in. That may be a bit of a pain doing manually (I'm assuming the controls are on the baseboard heaters) but probably not as much pain as paying an oversized electric bill. If you already have a programmable thermostat, just program it appropriately. This doesn't cost you any money.

The next step should be (if you not already have) installing programmable thermostat(s). This will cost you some money, but it shouldn't be too bad.

In the long term, you may want to switch over to heat pumps like these: »www.grainger.com/Grainger/ductle···t=subset and perhaps add some extra insulation and replace your windows with better ones.

As for insulation, I had good luck putting 1" .. 1.5" polyisocyanurate foam on the inside walls/ceilings, and then adding a layer of drywall on top of it, but depending on your house, other solutions may be more suitable and better.

The majority of heat pumps are in the $800 .. $3000 range, so they are not cheap, but they should pay off over time. Likewise, adding additional insulation/windows replacement may be a costly hassle initially, but they should pay off in the long run.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to AVD

said by AVD:

said by Jim:

said by Hall:

A "well guy" ? I didn't know there were people who were that specialized. I don't mean that as an insult either -- I live in the city, always have, and have no exposure to well water.

Our septic guy will not touch our well or inside plumbing. Our well guy will not touch our septic system nor will he do indoor plumbing beyond the pressure tank. I guess there is enough work without overlap although I'm sure it happens.

might be legal or insurance issues too.

In Virginia the well folks have to be licensed by the State Health Department. So it is different.


Archivis
Your Daddy
Premium
join:2001-11-26
Earth
kudos:19
reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

In the short term, you should turn them down, or completely off in areas not occupied, and then turn them back only when someone is in that area. So when you go to bed, turn down the heat in everywhere except the bedrooms you sleep in. That may be a bit of a pain doing manually (I'm assuming the controls are on the baseboard heaters) but probably not as much pain as paying an oversized electric bill. If you already have a programmable thermostat, just program it appropriately. This doesn't cost you any money.

This is exactly what we've been doing since we started this thread. I should go check my electric online, but I guess PPL Electric is down for maintenance for a few hours.

The next step should be (if you not already have) installing programmable thermostat(s). This will cost you some money, but it shouldn't be too bad.

We thought about it, but is it worth it if we're going to switch over to a heat pump?

In the long term, you may want to switch over to heat pumps like these: »www.grainger.com/Grainger/ductle···t=subset and perhaps add some extra insulation and replace your windows with better ones.

I'm looking into the insulation now. Our windows seem to be pretty modern. They're Anderson windows. Not sure how that holds up. We have an outdoor AC unit. I could replace it with a heat pump, do little duct work and have a heat pump unit.
--
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have. -MLK