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thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
reply to LazMan

Re: Plumbing Question - New Sump Pump

The flooding comes up through the floor, hydro static pressure is my guess.

The building is a duplex, there is some yard, maybe 30 ft or so to the back fence and the same to the street. Also 8ft on either side to the fence.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
lasalle, most of lasalle has combined storm and sanitary sewers, no storm sewers persay (hence the smell on lasalle blvd around the police station) its pretty common for houses in lasalle to have sump pumps into the city sewers but im not sure of the legality. I know the duplexes in the avenues (between bishop power and gagne) that were built in the 60s have their french drains going into the city sewer.

thestealth
Premium
join:2009-11-10
Lasalle, QC
said by telco_mtl:

lasalle, most of lasalle has combined storm and sanitary sewers, no storm sewers persay (hence the smell on lasalle blvd around the police station) its pretty common for houses in lasalle to have sump pumps into the city sewers but im not sure of the legality. I know the duplexes in the avenues (between bishop power and gagne) that were built in the 60s have their french drains going into the city sewer.

So assuming we can tie the pump into the drain (as there are many examples in my area it seems), where would I do it in my diagram?

No weeping tile at all. Before undertaking an internal weeping tile project, we thought of just doing the pit to see how well it would work. The duplex is upper/lower, so my neighbour is above me, so no shared basement to worry about. I have already had some quotes done and cannot afford a full weeping system at the moment, hence just trying out a pit to see if it helps. If it does, I may attempt to add an internal weeping system in the future, but for now I will dig a pit and put a pump.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
said by thestealth:

said by telco_mtl:

lasalle, most of lasalle has combined storm and sanitary sewers, no storm sewers persay (hence the smell on lasalle blvd around the police station) its pretty common for houses in lasalle to have sump pumps into the city sewers but im not sure of the legality. I know the duplexes in the avenues (between bishop power and gagne) that were built in the 60s have their french drains going into the city sewer.

So assuming we can tie the pump into the drain (as there are many examples in my area it seems), where would I do it in my diagram?

No weeping tile at all. Before undertaking an internal weeping tile project, we thought of just doing the pit to see how well it would work. The duplex is upper/lower, so my neighbour is above me, so no shared basement to worry about. I have already had some quotes done and cannot afford a full weeping system at the moment, hence just trying out a pit to see if it helps. If it does, I may attempt to add an internal weeping system in the future, but for now I will dig a pit and put a pump.

most people tee into the pipe and install a standpipe like on a washer


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to thestealth
said by thestealth:

So assuming we can tie the pump into the drain (as there are many examples in my area it seems), where would I do it in my diagram?

Pretty much anywhere as long as it's properly installed to prevent backflowing into the sink or washer.

Remember though, just because it once was acceptable doesn't mean it's permitted anymore. The EPA in the US is in the midst of requiring municipalities to separate storm and sanitary sewers to prevent raw sewage overflow during peak usage during storms and such. It also reduces the expense of treating storm water unnecessarily. Obviously the US EPA doesn't have reach in Quebec, but there are similar efforts in Canada. And from that, it mentioned that new combined sewers are permitted, only repairs to existing infrastructure. Since this in essence would be a new installation and not a repair that would be grandfathered in, I'd be surprise if it's allowed.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
said by cdru:

said by thestealth:

So assuming we can tie the pump into the drain (as there are many examples in my area it seems), where would I do it in my diagram?

Pretty much anywhere as long as it's properly installed to prevent backflowing into the sink or washer.

Remember though, just because it once was acceptable doesn't mean it's permitted anymore. The EPA in the US is in the midst of requiring municipalities to separate storm and sanitary sewers to prevent raw sewage overflow during peak usage during storms and such. It also reduces the expense of treating storm water unnecessarily. Obviously the US EPA doesn't have reach in Quebec, but there are similar efforts in Canada. And from that, it mentioned that new combined sewers are permitted, only repairs to existing infrastructure. Since this in essence would be a new installation and not a repair that would be grandfathered in, I'd be surprise if it's allowed.

I agree that connecting to the sanitary sewer is not ideal but in the OP's neighborhood properties are small so their is no practical way to let it percolate to his soil, it will just loop back. But i do agree on the overflows, his municipality is connected to the south branch of the montreal sewage interceptor. Regularly in the summer the overflow sluice allows water out on his towns waterfront. The major problem in his municipality is a combination of combined sewers with major shopping malls with their roofs and parking lots as well as mostly flat roof homes with roof drains all dumping into the sewer system.


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
said by telco_mtl:

I agree that connecting to the sanitary sewer is not ideal but in the OP's neighborhood properties are small so their is no practical way to let it percolate to his soil, it will just loop back.

Unfortunately though "no practical way" isn't usually a valid exemption.

I'd still talk with the city to figure out what the options are. Some cities that have separate storm sewers that only combined during overflowing peak periods. Maybe they allow a street's storm sewer to be tapped with the thought of being able to separate the flow downstream sometime in the future.

telco_mtl

join:2012-01-06
said by cdru:

said by telco_mtl:

I agree that connecting to the sanitary sewer is not ideal but in the OP's neighborhood properties are small so their is no practical way to let it percolate to his soil, it will just loop back.

Unfortunately though "no practical way" isn't usually a valid exemption.

I'd still talk with the city to figure out what the options are. Some cities that have separate storm sewers that only combined during overflowing peak periods. Maybe they allow a street's storm sewer to be tapped with the thought of being able to separate the flow downstream sometime in the future.

actually in his town in all but the recent neighborhoods the storm sewers are the sanitary sewers. there are no "storm sewers" on the streets built prior to the 90s