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YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
Reviews:
·Comcast

[Connectivity] When and where will Google Fiber roll out next? (

Be nice to have this our way in the Northeast to create more pricing competition.

»news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-575714···tag=e703



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3

1 recommendation

Re: [Connectivity] When and where will Google Fiber roll out nex

said by YukonHawk:

Be nice to have this our way in the Northeast to create more pricing competition.

»news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-575714···tag=e703

pfft, like the NE needs more speed competition

Google fiber should go to places where Comcast competes with lousy DSL service like AT&T areas so they can force Comcast to increase speeds and lower rates
--
"I drank what?" -Socrates

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

1 recommendation

reply to YukonHawk

You're not going to like this answer, but the odds are far greater that Comcast will be willing to bring fiber to your home before Google Fiber is in more than a handful of cities. Kansas City is more of a "throwing down the gauntlet" type maneuver by Google. They will probably expand a bit more, but I wouldn't expect a country-wide expansion plan on their part.



YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by AVonGauss:

You're not going to like this answer, but the odds are far greater that Comcast will be willing to bring fiber to your home before Google Fiber is in more than a handful of cities. Kansas City is more of a "throwing down the gauntlet" type maneuver by Google. They will probably expand a bit more, but I wouldn't expect a country-wide expansion plan on their part.

I agree and the sooner the better. Unfortunately FIOS is not up this way thus it's likely I won't see Comcast FTTH or FTTP anytime soon. :-( Why would they bother?


Darknessfall
Premium
join:2012-08-17
kudos:5
reply to pflog

Well Connecticut has AT&T :/.



YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by Darknessfall:

Well Connecticut has AT&T :/.

I'm in the boonies on the north eastern end of Putnam County NY. I'm lucky I have electricity.


PeteC2
Got Mouse?
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-20
Bristol, CT
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to Darknessfall

said by Darknessfall:

Well Connecticut has AT&T :/.

Haaaahaaahaaaa they are BEEEEG Competition!

I can say that...I had AT&T (previously SBC, previously SNET) for 10 years...can't say that I miss it.

In the beginning AT&T DSL actually was the better service here, but they never progressed worth talking about. There is Uverse now, but they're not scaring anybody either...
--
Deeds, not words


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to YukonHawk

No where soon.
I think the article hints at the stopper, $6-8k per home.

few ISP's have the deep pocket or the rate of return to justify that sort of investment at one big blast, both cable and (some) Telco are taking incremental steps, which allows them to move fiber closer to the home/expand the fiber plant while they study the (literally) last 1/2 mile. The drop and it's equipment are a big chunk (50+%?) of the cost, an expense that can ONLY be repaid be that household.



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3

I wonder how much R&D costs there are to continuously improve the last mile though? Fiber, while a heavy front-end investment, should be able to last quite a bit longer than the incremental changes.

I agree to shareholders an amortized cost with incremental improvements to the customer looks better on paper than a high upfront cost with minimal (maintenance) investment thereafter, though.
--
"I drank what?" -Socrates



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

The fiber to the area/node, can be used in multiple ways (metro-e extensions, cell tower and other backhaul, security and smart meter backhaul LTE or other drop substitutes ) and the first fiber owner to reach the area will likely have a chance at ROI without greater HSI penetration (35% typical).
The question is will LTE or similar provide adequate back haul for most/MANY household making self install the normal mode in areas with strand mounted micro cells, and full install/house wiring /fiber or coax drops a super premium service.



RR Conductor
NWP RR Inc.,serving NW CA
Premium
join:2002-04-02
Redwood Valley, CA
kudos:1
reply to YukonHawk

I know one thing, it won't be here. Even though we're pretty rural, we in Mendocino County are are fairly close to their HQ, under 200 miles, why don't they start here in their "backyard"? Come on Google, give some back to the state that made you!



noc007

join:2002-06-18
Cumming, GA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to tshirt

said by tshirt:

No where soon.
I think the article hints at the stopper, $6-8k per home.

few ISP's have the deep pocket or the rate of return to justify that sort of investment at one big blast, both cable and (some) Telco are taking incremental steps, which allows them to move fiber closer to the home/expand the fiber plant while they study the (literally) last 1/2 mile. The drop and it's equipment are a big chunk (50+%?) of the cost, an expense that can ONLY be repaid be that household.

Sad thing is the tax incentives in the 1996 Telecommunications Act for the telcos was suppose to pay for that. Instead they've been lining their pockets while whining on how expensive that last mile is.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to tshirt

said by tshirt:

The question is will LTE or similar provide adequate back haul for most/MANY household making self install the normal mode in areas with strand mounted micro cells, and full install/house wiring /fiber or coax drops a super premium service.

I think the answer to this is both yes and no.

Urban areas, hell no. Too many people per Microcell/DAS.

Suburban areas, In most cases this will probably work for a few years. Much of this will depend on how quickly consumers move to the cloud. For example, if cloud storage takes off, there will be greater demand for FTTH.

Rural areas, probably cheaper to deliver FTTH in the long run. Lower maintenance costs on the fiber.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

sorry what I meant to say is:
Will LTE provide adequate drop replacement for MOST users FOR NOW? (think another 5 years)
with the fiber/coax(which actually has tremendous short run bandwidth) plant providing the backhaul.
again incremental build out VS Verizon style risk everything = shrink footprint = mass build.

short range LTE or other SHOULD have plenty of bandwidth in suburban and rural (rural problem is showing enough bandwidth usage/revenue to justify the fiber which is where gov't subsidy might HELP (not totally provide)) In cities (as you are) the copper to fiber transition makes more sense ... as long as there is reasonable cooperation from city gov't.

Expand your moderator at work