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Kyawa
Premium
join:2006-01-26
Middletown, MD

SMC SMCDG3-CCR

New install for an existing customer at a new location. Getting business triple play with static IP with the SMC modem/router/switch above. Can the SMC be "bridged" so I can use say a Cisco RV router? If so, how. Thanks



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3

said by Kyawa:

New install for an existing customer at a new location. Getting business triple play with static IP with the SMC modem/router/switch above. Can the SMC be "bridged" so I can use say a Cisco RV router? If so, how. Thanks

It can be put in a true bridge mode, but it requires a technician to do it and most don't know how (or claim not to know how) and of those that do, most won't do it.

It can, however, be setup to route your static IP block to the LAN side, and then you can have your Cisco RV take it from there.
--
"I drank what?" -Socrates


Kyawa
Premium
join:2006-01-26
Middletown, MD

Thanks. So are you saying that they won't give the username and password to make changes? On the other option, will I still be able to enter from a remote location via https to the RV or port forwarding on the RV?



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3

said by Kyawa:

Thanks. So are you saying that they won't give the username and password to make changes?

Correct. It used to be available, but it was really bad because basically all the modems had the same mso password so anyone could manage your modem from the LAN side (not sure about the WAN side if there's an option for the telnet port, hopefully not except to Comcast IPs).

On the other option, will I still be able to enter from a remote location via https to the RV or port forwarding on the RV?

If you assign the Cisco switch a public IP in your static IP block and disable the SMC's firewalling/packet inspection/etc then yes it will be, for all intents and purposes, like the Cisco is sitting on the Cable connection with the public IP. At that point all the SMC is doing is routing your static IP subnet to the LAN side.
--
"I drank what?" -Socrates


Kyawa
Premium
join:2006-01-26
Middletown, MD

Thanks again. They have also gave me the option to buy a modem on my own. I believe it was 2 different Surfboard (6120 & 6121) as well as Netgear CG3000DCR. Do you think that would just be the better option?



pflog
Bueller? Bueller?
Premium,MVM
join:2001-09-01
El Dorado Hills, CA
kudos:3

said by Kyawa:

Thanks again. They have also gave me the option to buy a modem on my own. I believe it was 2 different Surfboard (6120 & 6121) as well as Netgear CG3000DCR. Do you think that would just be the better option?

If you have a static IP, you cannot use the Surfboard modems unfortunately, as Comcast uses RIP for the IP assignment and those are "dumb" (bridge) modems.

The Netgear CG3000DCR is excellent. If you can get them to lease you one of those, I would highly recommend it. It supports 8 downstream bonded channels (vs. the SMC's 4) and IMHO is a better piece of hardware. I wasn't aware they were rolling them out or supporting them yet. I was given one a while back to see if it fixed some problems I was having, so I can speak firsthand that it's been rock solid except for one minor bug in which is blocks all ICMP if you select the block WAN pings.
--
"I drank what?" -Socrates


Kyawa
Premium
join:2006-01-26
Middletown, MD

That is too funny. The list of modems to buy came from the person at Comcast who's putting the business package together. So I tried to find the Netgear and its not commercially available.



NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast

said by Kyawa:

That is too funny. The list of modems to buy came from the person at Comcast who's putting the business package together. So I tried to find the Netgear and its not commercially available.

If your salesperson mentioned the SB612x series modems as a possibility for a static IP account, or the Netgear gateway box as a purchased device, I would advise trying to find another salesperson who has a clue about what Comcast actually allows. I sounds as if your salesperson is only interested in getting you to sign a contract (any contract), and is not at all interested in providing you with the service that you actually need.

As has been previously mentioned in this thread, Comcast will only allow static IP addresses on their leased Comcast branded SMC or Netgear gateway boxes.Neither the SMC or Netgear gateway boxes that Comcast will allow on their network are legally available for purchase by the customer; they are strictly leased boxes from Comcast.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
reply to Kyawa

said by Kyawa:

Thanks again. They have also gave me the option to buy a modem on my own. I believe it was 2 different Surfboard (6120 & 6121) as well as Netgear CG3000DCR. Do you think that would just be the better option?

Do you NEED a static IP address? As in do you have a use that requires an IP address that doesn't generally change? Do you NEED more than 1 IP address? In these cases you must take the SMC and use it.

If you don't NEED a static IP address or multiple IP and are only taking these because the sales rep mislead you into ordering them, then the best way to go is to get a standard leased DOCSIS 3 modem from Comcast.
--
PRescott7-2097


NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast

said by joako:

said by Kyawa:

Thanks again. They have also gave me the option to buy a modem on my own. I believe it was 2 different Surfboard (6120 & 6121) as well as Netgear CG3000DCR. Do you think that would just be the better option?

Do you NEED a static IP address? As in do you have a use that requires an IP address that doesn't generally change? Do you NEED more than 1 IP address? In these cases you must take the SMC and use it.

If you don't NEED a static IP address or multiple IP and are only taking these because the sales rep mislead you into ordering them, then the best way to go is to get a standard leased DOCSIS 3 modem from Comcast.

Actually, a Comcast Business Class account (dynamic or static IP) always has a "c05" config file that allows up to five dynamic IP addresses (except that if you are using one of the gateway boxes in gateway mode, you have no access to them), so really the only time that a Comcast supplied gateway is required is for a static IP address account.

Also, Comcast does not lease the the SB612x modems in all areas, so getting an "officially approved" leased modem is not always possible (meaning that the SB612x modem must be a purchased modem). Yes, you can possibly threaten not to sign the contract and have an exception made, but that is really not much different than what I did for a short while by insisting that my SMDC3G-CCR be put into bridge mode. I got it done (multiple times), but it was not worth the continuous hassle of dealing with Comcast CSRs with oversize egos who refused to allow it to stay in bridge mode. I very much suspect that if you use a "non approved" modem on your business class account (and don't at least have a SB612x that you can temporarily connect), it will be a constant hassle every time you need to call support. Of course, some people thrive on constant conflict, so that would be a classic case of YMMV.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

snuxoll

join:2013-02-28
reply to Kyawa

The SMCDG3-CCR does not support bridging, if you wish to have a public IP assigned to a device behind the router you will need to purchase a static IP that can then be assigned to the device of your choosing.



NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast

said by snuxoll:

The SMCDG3-CCR does not support bridging, if you wish to have a public IP assigned to a device behind the router you will need to purchase a static IP that can then be assigned to the device of your choosing.

The Comcast SMCD3G-CCR does indeed support a true bridge mode (I have personally used one in bridge mode with five devices behind it having public IP addresses). It is a Comcast marketing policy that does not support using the SMCD3G-CCR in true bridge mode; it is not a technical limitation. OTOH, it is a constant hassle with Comcast employees who insist on following marketing policy and doing factory resets on SMCD3G boxes that they find in bridge mode, so I certainly won't encourage anyone to actually do it for anything other than a brief test while waiting for a purchased SB612x modem to arrive via FedEx or UPS.

In the network diagram shown below, the WAN interfaces of the Netgear N150, the Linksys RTP300, the Linux server, the Windows server, and the TP-Link WR1043ND (which was also in bridge mode) each had their own public IP addresses behind an SMCD3G-CCR in bridge mode.


(DCS-network-diagram-Comcast_SMCD3G-TP-Link-GS108E-FS105-RTP300-NGR-150-ZSR-0104-)

--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.