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John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6
reply to tobicat

Re: If I move to the country?

said by tobicat:

Well I live a truly rural area. It is 15 miles to a small town and 36 to town with a supermarket ect.

I love it. I got DSL, phone, Direc TV and cell phone.

Yep I have septic, well and propane.

The closest neighbor is over a mile away and there are probably less than 20 families within a 5 mile radius.

What I don't have is noise, noisy neighbors, strangers knocking on my door, salesmen, ect.

I can do what I want when I want and nobody cares.

Going back over this....your name wouldn't happen to be 'Burt', would it? Do you live in Perfection?
--
No amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. You can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him. Well, you can try to...



hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to fartness

If you move to the "country", please do not bring your city slicker ways and habits with you. Leave them in the city and suburbs. Try to blend in and be a good neighbor.

And do not try to be too "country". Recall meeting one of my "new" neighbors one rainy Saturday. He was outfitted head to toe with brand new outdoor clothes from Eddie Bauer and REI. He acted like an asshole and still is. He gets no favors from me, I do not have the time. He started out by starting an argument as to where the property lines were. He did not like my barb wire fence. I had purposelessly built my fence 1 foot inside the property line, so I "owned" the fence. What he did not know, nor comprehend when I told him, I had had the place surveyed for a water right application 2 years prior.

It is also best to respect the old timers and find a way to get in their good graces. When I bought my property, I did not need to use it all at once. I made a deal with the farmer I bought it from. I let him farm the areas I was not using for no charge, in return I asked if he could do some welding or other stuff for me, if and when it came up. Plus I had some equipment he did not have and vice versa. I would see him doing a task and would drive over and see if he needed my help or just shoot the bull. That opened up the ability to talk with my other more established neighbors.

We also had verbal mutual aid pacts - if someone's well went out, then could run pipe and have backup until repaired, for example.

Also do not build an expensive house and install a state of the art alarm system, like one of my neighbors. He is over 1500 feet away and every Sunday at 11:00am the alarm went off when they were not home for 6 times or so. The Sheriff would usually show up 35 to 60 minutes later and then turn down my road, not sure where to go. A lot of crap could have been taken from the house in that time. This guy too, was a city slicker and would not trust me with codes or the number to his alarm company, until I walked him around his house and pointed out how a wire cutter could defeat his alarm system and told him how long the police response was and after the 2nd false alarm I no longer cared.

As to cost, it depends upon the land. Mine is a flat field. Gotta figure in other expenses to keep and maintain the land. And there are other hidden expenses, unique to you and your area that will crop up. One of my neighbors is more like a gentleman farmer. Nice guy, but spends about 8 hours on the weekends mowing grass and generally keeping the grounds looking nice.

Good luck.



City folk

@optonline.net
reply to HarryH3

Then the city folk put more lights on their property than the Empire State Building because it's too dark in the country.

Regarding animals: The King of Morocco owned a farm in our town. (Yes, really.) They were feeding the cattle near the edge of the property which caused some problems with the neighbors. Some tactful diplomacy resulted in them moving the feeding station to a less obnoxious area and everyone was happy.



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to hortnut

said by hortnut:

If you move to the "country", please do not bring your city slicker ways and habits with you. Leave them in the city and suburbs.

I'm trying to get away from these people...


hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Then you will most likely find some great down to earth people. Treat them right and they will do the same for you. The experience can be very rewarding on many levels.

I actually like shooting the bull with the neighbors and helping them out.

Plus when I need something done that I can not do, either by not having the skill levels or time, there is no better source of references than your neighbors. They know the guys who will do a good job for a reasonable price. Word of mouth is a very good thing. Of course that applies in all areas one may live.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

1 recommendation

reply to fartness

Plenty of good information in this thread on finding a place and such...let's work on your country social skills a bit...

- As hortnut See Profile mentioned, dress like the locals. Country folks are working people and they are dressed down most all the time. If they're dressed up, they're going to either a baptism, wedding or burial. If you're messing with the local girls, could be either or both of the latter.

- Read the local papers. Find out what is going on in the community. Participate in local events. Go to the local high school games and root for the home team. Have fun doing so...country locals support their school teams, if not by money then at least by doing so in spirit.

- Treat womenfolk and their children with respect and civility. Open the door for them and such when appropriate without making a 'show' of it. (Hint: If you find yourself in a position where the whole family is together, you need to allow the man of the family to take the lead in 'taking care of his own' (coming out the door of the market, for example). Of course, a circumstance might arise where it is more appropriate for you to do so, so don't hesitate. It's a fine line...but you'll have milliseconds to decide so don't worry. ) Watch your language. Good manners go a long way in the country. Make your mama proud to have raised such a fine son.

- Go to the local farm and hardware store for tools, supplies and such. Don't say "I can get that at teh Home Depot for cheaper!!" or you'll find that your money is no good in town and you'll be driving the 150 miles to HD for your stuff...forever. Ask questions even if you know the answer. Ask them what their thinking is on this and that. Ponder on the answer for a moment or two before moving on to the next question. Don't be in a 'big city rush'.

- Learn to drink what the locals drink, if you find yourself in that situation. If they're all drinking piss-water beer, you are too. Don't ask the bartender for something "better". Remember, you're trying to blend in. Microbrews, fruity drinks and wine spritzers are pretty much out.

- Go to the local farmer's market during the spring and summer. You'll see things that you don't see in the supermarkets and it's a good opportunity to chat and get to know the locals. Buy something.

- Go to the local fund raiser pancake breakfast for the local volunteer Fire Department. Make a contribution to their efforts above and beyond the cost of the breakfast. Meet the Chief and thank him for the hard work and dedication of his group. Same with the local Sheriff. Remember, these are your (new) friends and neighbors...they're not faceless JBTs like in the city. You'll find a different attitude in the country with respect to law enforcement.

- Learn what your neighbors drive and acknowledge them with a short hand wave as you pass on the road. It gets them wondering who YOU are. After a while you're 'that nice man who lives down the road who always waves'. Don't drive too fast...you never know what might be right around the bend. Take your time...you moved to the slower-paced country to enjoy life. Zoom-zooming is counterproductive to that objective.

- Take all the bumperstickers and that crap off your car (if applicable). Get a truck...even if it's a beater. You're going to need one anyway. It doesn't need a lift-kit, fancy paint, lightbars, decals and other stuff like that. It does need a trailer hitch, though. If it ever hauled manure, that's a plus.

- Leave the urban slang and such in the city when you leave. If you have tattoos, piercings, etc., cover them up. Nothing screams "murdering dope-fiend gang member" to country folk like those things, even if you're not..

- This might rankle some here, but get a gun (if you don't have one). Guns are a common tool in country life. Most people have one. A .22 like the Ruger 10/22 is fine...learn to use it properly and appropriately. You'll need it when the country predators come and kill your chickens that you raised from little peepers (you'll want some chickens since they keep the bugs down). I have a wood-stocked gun and leave the black guns at home when I go out to shoot with the locals. If nothing else, at least be conversant with the shooting sports and don't pass around any 'gun control' petitions.

- Find the local cemetery and take a look around. See what the family names are. Remember, we're all in-bred bastards in the country and we're all related. Speaking ill-will of one will have far-reaching repercussions.

- Go to the library and read newspapers from ten years ago and work your way forward to get caught up on the local 'recent' history. No need to become an expert...just get the lay of the land, so to speak.

- Get this book and read it. It's an easy read and will get you up-to-speed on a lot of things right away. Money well spent...

---

Even though I lived in the big city, I was fortunate in that I worked out on dairy farms, seed and grain farms and wood mills (as a service electrician) before I moved to the country. It made it easy for me to fit in. Only took five years before they started treating me like a local. That might be a record of some kind...
--
No amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. You can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him. Well, you can try to...



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

1 recommendation

reply to fartness

Only "skills" I would have to offer are computer skills. I don't see many computer stores in the country, plus around here in the country, they don't seem too good with computers. I've met a lot of people in the country. I guess this could be a plus. Especially if they need them for their businesses (farms, etc.).



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

1 edit

1 recommendation

I ran into one of my neighbors at the post office. She was having problems with her computer and had heard that I knew about such things. Would I come and look at it...??

Hmm...OK. No problem!

I get there an it is this ancient laptop with WinXP SP0 on it. Yep, totally unpatched. No anti-anything on it. Barefoot and fancy free, so to speak.

She is the local gardener lady (40YO redhead cutie, to boot) and uses it to generate billings and do email...that's it. So I cleaned off the "keeper" stuff, did a clean install and all the patches, etc. Got her system back in order. Ordered some RAM to max it out and speed it up a bit.

Since it is winter time, her business is slow now. So I made a trade with her. I have a book on western edible wild foods and medicines that I bought last year. Real nice book...glossy pages and plenty of color prints. I hadn't read all of yet so I had her go through it and mark the pages of the local flora and fauna with post-it flags while I was working on her machine. It would have taken me a long time to figure out what was local, but she knew right off the bat.

She's also going to haul some river sand for my onion and carrot beds for me when she heads up the river for a load for other customers. Getting sand out of the truck is easier than putting it in but I am sure she knows someone with a loader up yonder to ease her part of the deal.

So that was a win-win for both of us.

I'm making a huge pot of chicken stock now and baking loaves of fresh-ground wheat bread. I will share that with my old neighbor whose wife died last year as he gave me a dozen Fuji apples and a pound of dark chocolate that someone brought him (he can't eat it due to medical conditions).

I will also share some of the stock and bread with another neighbor that gave me some wine and a nice slab of salmon that she got when she went fishing in Alaska last week. I fixed her computer a few months ago (much the same problems as the laptop).

So yeah, you could do that...
--
No amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. You can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him. Well, you can try to...

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