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horacebork
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1 edit
reply to dave

Re: tracing a mac address

i have pasted in the items in question from the log (edited).
by trace, i mean find the source device. and it seems to only be associated with the network for a very short period of time.
my router has mac address filtering, but only 'allow', i think.
(edit: seems like i can set a filter for a mac address to 'no access' - good news)
it's an airport extreme base station (4th gen).

also, can i scan my network for a mac address?
---

Feb 27 10:45:41 Severity:5 Associated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 10:45:41 Severity:5 Installed unicast CCMP key for supplicant 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 10:50:05 Severity:5 Disassociated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 10:50:15 Severity:5 Associated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 10:50:15 Severity:5 Installed unicast CCMP key for supplicant 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:15:37 Severity:5 Disassociated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:15:47 Severity:5 Associated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:15:47 Severity:5 Installed unicast CCMP key for supplicant 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:21:04 Severity:5 Deauthenticating with station ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff (reserved 3).
Feb 27 11:21:04 Severity:5 Deauthenticating with station ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff (reserved 2).
Feb 27 11:21:05 Severity:5 Deauthenticating with station ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff (reserved 3).
Feb 27 11:21:05 Severity:5 Deauthenticating with station ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff (reserved 2).
Feb 27 11:21:08 Severity:5 Associated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:21:08 Severity:5 Installed unicast CCMP key for supplicant 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:28:41 Severity:5 Idle timeout for station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:28:41 Severity:5 Disassociating with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50 (reserved 4).
Feb 27 11:28:41 Severity:5 Disassociated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:29:18 Severity:5 Associated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:29:18 Severity:5 Installed unicast CCMP key for supplicant 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:54:31 Severity:5 Idle timeout for station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
Feb 27 11:54:31 Severity:5 Disassociating with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50 (reserved 4).
Feb 27 11:54:31 Severity:5 Disassociated with station 00:24:d2:ab:05:50
--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
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2 edits

1 recommendation

said by horacebork:

also, can i scan my network for a mac address?

Well you can't "scan" as such but you can use an arp utility either on a PC or on your router if it supports it's use.

As jaykaykay See Profile said you can lookup a MAC address to find some basic info.

For example this site says this

quote:
MAC address 0024D2
Company Askey Computer

about 00:24:d2:ab:05:50.

From that log it looks to me as though someone tried to connect to your Wi-Fi but didn't successfully connect.

Are you using security for your Wi-Fi? You should be using WPA-AES with a long password. WEP is breakable in seconds and address filtering is easily bypassed.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


Raphion

join:2000-10-14
Samsara

If I'm not mistaken, FiOS Actiontek routers have an "Askey Computer" MAC address.



horacebork
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reply to StuartMW

the wireless is wpa2 with a strong password, but not a full-length (64 byte) password, which i have been avoiding.
maybe it's time to bring that issue to the front.
--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."



horacebork
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1 edit
reply to Raphion

a fios router on the network would be truly odd because our building is wired for cable and does not have fios.
it has to be something else.

now i just want to scan the other apartments on the network for that mac address.

btw: i have cut my router output to 50% to reduce it's range.
would a vpn prevent others from connecting to my wifi?

also, my wifi is set to not broadcast. not sure how someone picked up the network name.

--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."



AVD
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1 recommendation

reply to horacebork

mac filters are easily circumvented. It will cause trouble for legitimate clients and not affect the bad guys at all.
--
* seek help if having trouble coping
--Standard disclaimers apply.--


dave
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not in ohio
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reply to StuartMW

In case you didn't know, Windows has an ARP command. This only seems to query the local ARP cache, so may be of limited use.

To resolve a MAC address to an IP address, arp -a | findstr nn-nn-nn-nn-nn-nn



AVD
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192.168.1.104

now what?



StuartMW
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reply to dave

said by dave:

In case you didn't know, Windows has an ARP command.

Yes I know.

This only seems to query the local ARP cache, so may be of limited use.

I'm aware of that too. Not knowing whether the OP let his router assign IP's (most common) or has a service on a PC doing it I wrote
quote:
...you can use an arp utility either on a PC or on your router if it supports it's use.
My router has a very good command line processor and since I have it configured as a DHCP server I'd use it's ARP command (and have).
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


horacebork
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stuartmw:

I'm aware of that too. Not knowing whether the OP let his router assign IP's (most common) or has a service on a PC doing it I wrote

quote:
...you can use an arp utility either on a PC or on your router if it supports it's use.

i like to use static ips, so i assign them. my router is an airport extreme base station.
i'm almost positive there's no command line access.
might there be a way that some mix of disabling dhcp and other configs could help secure the router?

re: arp - i'm running os x, i have arp on the command line.
how can i utilize this to help secure my network?
and would some machine on the network always have to be on?
--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."

SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

So wait you statically assign IPs, yet you left DHCP on? From a quick Google search I see that good ol' Apple doesn't think you'd ever want to disable DHCP. Here's a workaround: »macnugget.org/projects/aebx/

Since your router has no command line access you can't check the ARP command there so you're basically at the end of the road here.


SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2
reply to Raphion

said by Raphion:

If I'm not mistaken, FiOS Actiontek routers have an "Askey Computer" MAC address.

Just to add to this, Askey is a huge Chinese OEM, they make network gear for lots of other brands (they're known to make equipment under contract for Actiontec, Netgear, and more). So you cannot really tell much of anything from the vendor name. Probably anyone with a cheap brand USB Wi-Fi adapter is using an Askey made design under the plastic encolosure.


AVD
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cool name
Askey = ACSII


SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
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said by AVD:

cool name
Askey = ACSII

Yeah I know it is a pretty neat little name.


StuartMW
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reply to horacebork

said by horacebork:

i like to use static ips, so i assign them.

Actually I have some static IP's and some pseudo-static IP's (IP's assigned through DHCP but "static" based on their MAC address).

That mean's I don't have a have a local DNS server (I use Windows HOST files to name my stuff).
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


StuartMW
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2 recommendations

reply to AVD

said by AVD:

Askey = ACSII

For me Ass-Key came to mind
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

dave
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join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8

Is it related to that 'password safe' product?

Keep-Ass.



StuartMW
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1 recommendation

reply to horacebork

said by horacebork:

also, my wifi is set to not broadcast. not sure how someone picked up the network name.

You might want to read this

Myth vs. reality: Wireless SSIDs

Using WPA2 with a longish password (mine is 63-chars of pseudo-random upper/lower case, digits and symbols) is your best protection. The other stuff doesn't really help, insofar as security, but can still be useful IMO.

BTW do you have WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) enabled? That is breakable.

WiFi Protected Setup Flaw Can Lead to Compromise of Router PINs
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

Looks like Apple has WPS, but doesn't use it by default and they removed it from their setup wizard in more recent versions.

quote:
It seems the picture is getting clearer with every post and I think we can say that using Apple's routers is safe with respect to the current WPS-threat as long as one does not choose to run the optional "Add Wireless Clients..." function (Menu "Base Station" in Airport Utility).
Sheesh, Apple makes technical details so hard to find... People weren't even sure if it did WPS initially since they of course used a different name instead of WPS, and then they've removed the feature from their setup tool, but you can still get to it from older version of the tool, etc. etc.


StuartMW
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said by SpHeRe31459:

Sheesh, Apple makes technical details so hard to find...

Well that is consistent with their whole philosophy of hiding technical details so the "average user" can use the product (whatever it is).
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


horacebork
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join:2011-03-17
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3 edits
reply to StuartMW

re: depressing info about unbroadcast ssid - got it
re: 63 char wpa2 password - next on my list [edit] done.

--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."



horacebork
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reply to SpHeRe31459

So wait you statically assign IPs, yet you left DHCP on?

right. there are still a couple of devices that i cannot assign static ip on the device itself.
the apple tv is one of them. i could reserve a static ip for it's mac address, i suppose ..

is there a way by disabling dhcp that i can prevent an outside machine from gaining a compatible ip address on my lan?

--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."

SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

said by horacebork:

So wait you statically assign IPs, yet you left DHCP on?

right. there are still a couple of devices that i cannot assign static ip on the device itself.
the apple tv is one of them. i could reserve a static ip for it's mac address, i suppose ..

is there a way by disabling dhcp that i can prevent an outside machine from gaining a compatible ip address on my lan?

Seems to me like you pretty much already hit on what you can do. Reserve the MAC address of those devices that can't be set statically (manually). Then set the DHCP pool to exactly the number of devices that must use DHCP.

I don't know of any TCP/IP enabled device that cannot be manually assigned. I'm pretty sure to be a TCP/IP enabled device the specifications mandate that it must expose a method for manual assignment.

For example: with a simple Google search of "apple tv static ip address" I immediately found instructions for setting a static IP address for Apple TV...

Menu >> Settings
General
Network
Configure TCP/IP
Choose Manually
Enter your desired IP


EGeezer
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said by SpHeRe31459:

Reserve the MAC address of those devices that can't be set statically (manually). Then set the DHCP pool to exactly the number of devices that must use DHCP.

That'll work nicely unless someone tries to spoof one of the MAC addresses. Then, as they say, results may be unpredictable.
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.

SpHeRe31459

join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

Right, it's sort of the best that can be done in that situation. I would think that it's pretty slim chances that someone is going to try that hard to mess with some random person's wireless network that was probably just seen while wardriving around or something.



StuartMW
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1 edit
reply to EGeezer

said by SpHeRe31459:

Reserve the MAC address of those devices that can't be set statically (manually). Then set the DHCP pool to exactly the number of devices that must use DHCP.

I've been doing exactly this for years. I also have some static IP's (set in the device) that are outside the pool. If someone manages to spoof any one of my IP's then I have more serious issues
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


horacebork
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1 edit
reply to StuartMW

Using WPA2 with a longish password (mine is 63-chars of pseudo-random upper/lower case, digits and symbols) is your best protection. The other stuff doesn't really help, insofar as security, but can still be useful IMO.

could you put a little more meat on the bones here? i am wondering what happens if someone sees traffic with an 8 char key vs traffic with a 63 char key.

how does the snooper know the difference, and what do they see so they can decrypt the key and gain access to the router?

is there some way i can see the encrypted key on my router?
am i even asking the correct question?

[edit] does the ssid have anything to do with the wireless security?

--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."


StuartMW
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said by horacebork:

how does the snooper know the difference, and what do they see so they can decrypt the key and gain access to the router?

They don't. Encrypted traffic is encrypted traffic.

The difference is that its much easier to brute-force or use a dictionary attack on an 8 characters pass-phrase (especially if it's a word) rather than a longer pseudo-randomly generated one.

is there some way i can see the encrypted key on my router?

If you mean the actual binary key (vs the "pass-phrase") used for encryption some devices allow you to see that (mine does but not in it's web page).

does the ssid have anything to do with the wireless security?

Not really. Hiding your SSID prevents less sophisticated people from trying to connect to your network but that's about it.

--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


horacebork
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i used to have an 8 character password on my wpa2 wifi.
it was very randomized and no dictionary attack could crack it.
brute force, quite possibly, i suppose - just keep sending random sequences to the router until something works.
start the brute force with 8 char sequences and go from there.

re: ssid - here's a quote off a page »cybercoyote.org/classes/wifi/wpa2.shtml

Due to the naive design of WPA2, the name of your network is the starting point for hackers. It is broadcast in the clear, and it's easy to look up your encryption key on widely available rainbow tables if your SSID is simple. The more random your network name, the better. Treat your WiFi network name as you would a password. Make it complex and avoid using any whole words. Maximum length for an SSID is 32 characters.

not sure if it's just nonsense or what. my ssid is kinda short.
--
".. the sofa has just vanished." ".. well, that's one mystery less."


StuartMW
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As I recall, and I'm not 100% sure, but I think the WPA2 binary encryption key is a one function with the SSID and the pass-phrase as inputs. If so that's why knowing the SSID helps somewhat. But as you now know the SSID, whatever it is, is easily learned as it is transmitted in the clear (broadcasting enabled or not).
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!