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silvercat

join:2007-11-07
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to Guspaz

Re: What type of router to purchase?

Also another option for HDMI cables is Meritline:
»www.meritline.com/hdmi-cables---c-7737.aspx

Ships from China, so takes three weeks (but a lot of items if not most ? are free shipping).



elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
reply to TypeS

said by TypeS:

The 300W power supply is just fine, the GT630 is second from the bottom, its a very low power card and probably does minimally better than on-die graphics solutions from Intel & AMD.

Maybe so but MINIMUM system power requirement 300 watts for the GT630. So with system overhead and a 150 watt buffer(safety) allowance you're looking at 550-650 watt PSU easily.

Running the minimum specs is just asking for trouble and eliminating any upgrade path. Pay me know or pay me big time later. You know how it works.

»www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop···ications


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22

said by elitefx:

said by TypeS:

The 300W power supply is just fine, the GT630 is second from the bottom, its a very low power card and probably does minimally better than on-die graphics solutions from Intel & AMD.

Maybe so but MINIMUM system power requirement 300 watts for the GT630. So with system overhead and a 150 watt buffer(safety) allowance you're looking at 550-650 watt PSU easily.

Running the minimum specs is just asking for trouble and eliminating any upgrade path. Pay me know or pay me big time later. You know how it works.

»www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop···ications

Yikes, talk about overkill. My system has an i7-3770K and a GTX 670 with only a 500W PSU (and is specifically certified to run both those parts or better at the same time), and you're saying she needs a 650w for a dinky little 630?

She's got a 95W processor and a 65W GPU; a 300W power supply is perfectly fine.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to silvercat

said by silvercat:

Also another option for HDMI cables is Meritline:
»www.meritline.com/hdmi-cables---c-7737.aspx

Ships from China, so takes three weeks (but a lot of items if not most ? are free shipping).

The first links on that page is a 25 foot 30 AWG cable, which is ludicrous. No surprise that the reviews for the item state it doesn't work at 1080p, only lower resolutions. The positive reviews seem to be for a completely different 6-foot cable...

The only 30 foot cable I see there is listed as 28AWG, which is also too thin without some form of active equalization like RedMere...

Suggestion based on what I'm seeing: avoid the cables meritline is selling. The 25-foot 26AWG one they have is probably OK, but it's not long enough if you're looking for 30 feet.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


silvercat

join:2007-11-07
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to MissSherlock

hi MissSherlock:

The stock firmware on the RT-N66U should be good enough for you. There's also the "Merlin" firmware:
»www.lostrealm.ca/tower/node/79

Quoting from the "Merlin" website: "The primary goal of this custom firmware is to tweak, fix bugs, and enhance the original Asus firmware. It is NOT meant to become a feature-ladden alternative - for that look at existing solutions, such as Tomato or DD-WRT, both offering a wealth of additional features."

More discussion about the Asuswrt-Merlin firmware on the SmallNetBuilder forums:
»forums.smallnetbuilder.com/forum···php?f=42

And some of us prefer Tomato (i prefer the Toastman version). Might be more of a challenge to initially flash Tomato on the RT-N66U. You need to use the Asus Firmware Restoration Utility for that. I got stuck where i initially flashed to Tomato, but then i couldn't access the router's webpage configuration at all ! Researched and found out that i had to do a factory reset after the initial Tomato firmware flash. With the router powered off, press and hold the "reset" button (it's the button nearer to the power jack -- there's another button at the other end of the router (WPS ?) that you don't touch) for 30 seconds. While still having that button pressed down, power on the router (hit the power button) -- wait for another 30 seconds, then release that "reset" button. At least i think that's how it goes (from memory) for resetting the router to factory defaults. Someone correct me if i'm mistaken.

Nice thing about Tomato is that, it's "different", and you have a lot more "QOS" options.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

Benchmarks seem to show that Tomato has a big negative effect on the throughput of some of these routers. This may be because some of the stock firmwares ship with some secret-sauce Broadcom kernel modules that Tomato doesn't, for example.

EDIT: Specifically, the RT-N66U sees a massive performance hit for wifi throughput with Tomato: »forums.smallnetbuilder.com/showt···p?t=7978
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



silvercat

join:2007-11-07
reply to Guspaz

Good point.



silvercat

join:2007-11-07
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

Benchmarks seem to show that Tomato has a big negative effect on the throughput of some of these routers. This may be because some of the stock firmwares ship with some secret-sauce Broadcom kernel modules that Tomato doesn't, for example.

Yes you're right. With the stock Asus firmware, if QOS is disabled, you get faster throughput over wireless (20 - 23 (?) MB/sec i believe ?) If QOS is enabled on the Asus router, wireless throughput shouldn't be any faster (i don't think) than the Tomato firmware.

vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1
reply to Guspaz

i also seen the rogers speed boost doesnt seem to work on tomato, wrt54gl-tm, speed test show my sustained speed but if i connect directly into rogers modem i see speed boost working

i dont have qos enabled and tried every conceivable tomato setting but still dont see any speed boost when testing from any speedtest websites

ya i know some are going to say speed boost is useless, but i just like to know why its not working on tomato/router



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

With a WRT54GL, most likely you're just maxing out how fast the thing can route data. My experience with MLPPP showed it's definitely not fast enough to route a 50 meg MLPPP bundle, for example. I think mine topped out somewhere around 30ish?
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

i thought so too, but b4 rogers could shape my speed when i initially got their internet, i was getting over 35 - 45mb on a 25mb plan, now i just get over 26-28mb

the ports are 100mb so i cant see why the router would be the issue unless someone can confirm getting 75-85mb w/speed boost on tomato w/a 25/2 plan



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

The ports are 100 megabit, but there's a difference between how fast the switch chip can switch packets and how fast the very very very slow CPU can route packets.

The WRT54G is an 11-year old hardware series... it was fantastic when it came out, but you're expecting a bit much from it to still be able to keep up with today's needs.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

ya i know, but i love the damn thing( i own 2 of them), it never dies on me, dont think any router will outlive this thing, they only thing it supposedly cant do is use rogers speed boost and the 5ghz radio, other than that its flawless and imho not worth spending any money on another router



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

Well, the limitations are:

1) Very little RAM limits what it can do
2) Very little flash means custom firmware can only have limited features
3) Extremely slow CPU gives it very low routed throughput (which drops if you try to use CPU-intensive features like QoS)
4) No gigabit switch means very slow copies over the LAN
5) No 802.11n support means wireless maxes out at 20 Mbps rather than the 150+ that a decent 802.11n device can do
6) No 5GHz support means that it's stick on overcongested 2.4 GHz spectrum

The thing is basically useless in my apartment. So slow of a CPU it can't route my internet connection fast enough, so slow of an ethernet switch it slows my file copies to a crawl, so slow on wireless (and congestion) that playing back media files over the network barely works.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

i dont need/use 5ghz
5 family members hardwired via switch and keeps this thing going, average 500gb/mnth of internet traffic and never froze
3 cell phones connecting wireless
tm model can support the big tomato file, but only use/need the mini
we dont transfer much between comps so gig switch not needed but they still can stream from my machine to theirs without issues


m3chen

join:2009-12-03
Toronto, ON
reply to MissSherlock

+1 for PFSense on an x86 computer! A thinclient + gig switch with an added 1000/100/10 ethernet card (intel) should make a good wired router option.


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

reply to MissSherlock
+1 for PFSense on an x86 computer! A thinclient + gig switch with an added 1000/100/10 ethernet card (intel) should make a good wired router option.

was going to try that to see if speed boost would work, just for fun kind of thing



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

pfsense on an x86 computer tends to cost a heck of a lot more than the hundred bucks a good wireless router costs, though... and doesn't really offer any advantages for the typical user.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

1 edit

was going todo it more for fun, it just a dumb terminal setup, cost for electricity shouldnt be much

edit: i already have the hardware



TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to elitefx

said by elitefx:

said by TypeS:

The 300W power supply is just fine, the GT630 is second from the bottom, its a very low power card and probably does minimally better than on-die graphics solutions from Intel & AMD.

Maybe so but MINIMUM system power requirement 300 watts for the GT630. So with system overhead and a 150 watt buffer(safety) allowance you're looking at 550-650 watt PSU easily.

Running the minimum specs is just asking for trouble and eliminating any upgrade path. Pay me know or pay me big time later. You know how it works.

»www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop···ications

Minimum requirement from both NVIDIA and AMD are always conservative and are well above the actual minimum. OEMs are not fools, they would not release a product that just barely functions. Sites like Guru3D measure the actual power draws of cards and systems running a load, and they reach the same consensus as well.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22

1 edit
reply to MissSherlock

Anandtech's real-world results are telling:

»www.anandtech.com/show/5818/nvid···-evga/18

That's using an overclocked six-core extreme edition Sandy Bridge... much more power usage than the i7-3770.

How much does the entire system use, with that CPU, the GTX 680, running Metro 2033? 370 watts. OCCT torture test? Maxes out the GPU but not the CPU, so 333 watts.

Most of the people insisting they need massive power supplies in this day and age are just ignorant. VERY few people can even justify more than 500 watts on a modern computer. SLI/CrossFire is about the only justification to go higher, and even then you'd be hard-pressed to justify more than 700 watts or so (GTX 680 in SLI took the system up to 536 watts).

My file server has a 750W because it needs to support the inrush current of 15 hard disks spinning up their motors at the same time, which is probably 450W for the HDDs alone, being conservative. My desktop, with an i7-3770k, a GeForce GTX 670, and two Intel SSDs (and a bluray burner) has a 500W power supply, and even that's almost overkill because I'm not sure I could do anything that would even break 350W. It's an SFF case (the size of a shoebox), though, and both the CPU and GPU are on the certified list.

Quality is another thing. I'd sooner own a 500W very high quality PSU than a 1000W noname brand PSU. Because the 500W quality unit will provide every advertised watt (and probably more if you torture it), while the noname brand one will probably blow at half the rating if you're lucky.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


zorxd

join:2010-02-05
Quebec, QC
Reviews:
·Acanac

1 edit

Anandtech probably measure input power. Output power should be about 80% of these. PSU are marketed using their output power.

However we must take into account the different channels. The most important thing is not the total output power, but the maximum power on the channel that is most likely be going to be used to its limit. A high quality 400W might be better than a low quality 500W at this.

Power supply are not very efficient when used at only 10% of their maximum power. They reach their peek efficiency at about 50%. So getting a bigger PSU is not always better, as it will generate more heat. Most of the time an idle (or web browsing) PC will use about 100-120W.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

Most good PSUs today are single-rail; almost all the power consumed in a PC is 12V, and they have a single large 12V rail. So only one "channel" for the whole PSU.

For example, the Corsair TX750 in my server (Corsair's TX line is good stuff, not cheap, but reliable) is a single-rail design that outputs 720W on a 60A +12v rail. It also does 100W@+3.3V, 140W@+5V, 10W@-12V, and 15W@+5VSB, but the overall system is rated for only 750W.

Point is, pretty much all of the power is available to the 12V devices in the computer, and you don't have to worry about what is on what rail. Just plug it all in and go. Most good PSUs are like this.

EDIT: Page 5: »www.corsair.com/en/media/cms/man···lish.pdf
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



MXB

join:2009-12-18
Burlington, ON
reply to MissSherlock

I'd recommend D-Link. Bought one for $30 in 2002 and it's perfect still.
--
01/01/01


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1

said by MXB:

I'd recommend D-Link. Bought one for $30 in 2002 and it's perfect still.

dlink, which one
thats like saying you cant go wrong if you buy a car from gm


franklyong
Cisco Geek

join:2004-12-05
Canada
kudos:1
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
reply to MissSherlock

I'd say one of the Linksys EA / E Series. Even a E3200 should do him fine I assume especially since it is going for 50 bucks at CanadaComputers.

Can't go wrong with Netgear / ASUS just imo felt Linksys's newer F/W have been more stable. (Easy to setup for the average user, good on total simultaneous connections, and support for Tomato + DD-WRT).

On the power supply I used to think the same until I got a kill-a-watt meter.

Got a 400W OCZ Fatal!ty Power Supply powering a Q8300, GTX 560, 7 Fans, and 4 HDD's.
Runs at 130W idle and under 280W on Full Load (thats counting the efficiency loss from 80PLUS)
Mind you wattage isn't AS significant as Amperage on +12V and your other voltages anymore.
--
Residence: WRT400N DD-WRT - pfSense P4 2.8GHZ, 1.5GB RAM
Home: Teksavvy Extreme Cable 28/1
WNDR3700 + RT-N13 DD-WRT



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22

said by franklyong:

Can't go wrong with Netgear / ASUS just imo felt Linksys's newer F/W have been more stable. (Easy to setup for the average user, good on total simultaneous connections, and support for Tomato + DD-WRT).

Yes, because that recent incident where they forced everybody's routers to do a firmware update without their consent that disabled most functionality unless they created a cloud linksys account was just the epitome of trust and reliability.

No thanks. I've bought my last Linksys product, I'm not sure if they can ever be trusted again after that debacle.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


Mike2009

join:2009-01-13
Ottawa, ON
kudos:3

I agree with Guspaz about Linksys but Netgear and Asus would be great choices.


MissSherlock

join:2009-05-17
Ontario

Many thanks for all the recommendations.

Should I use the firmware that comes with the Asus RT-66 (current stable version) or use another firmware?

Thanks,



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:22
reply to MissSherlock

Try the stock firmware first. Only if it doesn't meet your needs should you start looking into custom firmware.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org