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Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23

1 edit
reply to MissSherlock

Re: What type of router to purchase?

Anandtech's real-world results are telling:

»www.anandtech.com/show/5818/nvid···-evga/18

That's using an overclocked six-core extreme edition Sandy Bridge... much more power usage than the i7-3770.

How much does the entire system use, with that CPU, the GTX 680, running Metro 2033? 370 watts. OCCT torture test? Maxes out the GPU but not the CPU, so 333 watts.

Most of the people insisting they need massive power supplies in this day and age are just ignorant. VERY few people can even justify more than 500 watts on a modern computer. SLI/CrossFire is about the only justification to go higher, and even then you'd be hard-pressed to justify more than 700 watts or so (GTX 680 in SLI took the system up to 536 watts).

My file server has a 750W because it needs to support the inrush current of 15 hard disks spinning up their motors at the same time, which is probably 450W for the HDDs alone, being conservative. My desktop, with an i7-3770k, a GeForce GTX 670, and two Intel SSDs (and a bluray burner) has a 500W power supply, and even that's almost overkill because I'm not sure I could do anything that would even break 350W. It's an SFF case (the size of a shoebox), though, and both the CPU and GPU are on the certified list.

Quality is another thing. I'd sooner own a 500W very high quality PSU than a 1000W noname brand PSU. Because the 500W quality unit will provide every advertised watt (and probably more if you torture it), while the noname brand one will probably blow at half the rating if you're lucky.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


zorxd

join:2010-02-05
Quebec, QC
Reviews:
·Acanac

1 edit

Anandtech probably measure input power. Output power should be about 80% of these. PSU are marketed using their output power.

However we must take into account the different channels. The most important thing is not the total output power, but the maximum power on the channel that is most likely be going to be used to its limit. A high quality 400W might be better than a low quality 500W at this.

Power supply are not very efficient when used at only 10% of their maximum power. They reach their peek efficiency at about 50%. So getting a bigger PSU is not always better, as it will generate more heat. Most of the time an idle (or web browsing) PC will use about 100-120W.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to MissSherlock

Most good PSUs today are single-rail; almost all the power consumed in a PC is 12V, and they have a single large 12V rail. So only one "channel" for the whole PSU.

For example, the Corsair TX750 in my server (Corsair's TX line is good stuff, not cheap, but reliable) is a single-rail design that outputs 720W on a 60A +12v rail. It also does 100W@+3.3V, 140W@+5V, 10W@-12V, and 15W@+5VSB, but the overall system is rated for only 750W.

Point is, pretty much all of the power is available to the 12V devices in the computer, and you don't have to worry about what is on what rail. Just plug it all in and go. Most good PSUs are like this.

EDIT: Page 5: »www.corsair.com/en/media/cms/man···lish.pdf
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



MXB

join:2009-12-18
Burlington, ON
reply to MissSherlock

I'd recommend D-Link. Bought one for $30 in 2002 and it's perfect still.
--
01/01/01


vincom

join:2009-03-06
Bolton, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable

said by MXB:

I'd recommend D-Link. Bought one for $30 in 2002 and it's perfect still.

dlink, which one
thats like saying you cant go wrong if you buy a car from gm


franklyong
Cisco Geek

join:2004-12-05
Canada
kudos:1
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
reply to MissSherlock

I'd say one of the Linksys EA / E Series. Even a E3200 should do him fine I assume especially since it is going for 50 bucks at CanadaComputers.

Can't go wrong with Netgear / ASUS just imo felt Linksys's newer F/W have been more stable. (Easy to setup for the average user, good on total simultaneous connections, and support for Tomato + DD-WRT).

On the power supply I used to think the same until I got a kill-a-watt meter.

Got a 400W OCZ Fatal!ty Power Supply powering a Q8300, GTX 560, 7 Fans, and 4 HDD's.
Runs at 130W idle and under 280W on Full Load (thats counting the efficiency loss from 80PLUS)
Mind you wattage isn't AS significant as Amperage on +12V and your other voltages anymore.
--
Residence: WRT400N DD-WRT - pfSense P4 2.8GHZ, 1.5GB RAM
Home: Teksavvy Extreme Cable 28/1
WNDR3700 + RT-N13 DD-WRT



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23

said by franklyong:

Can't go wrong with Netgear / ASUS just imo felt Linksys's newer F/W have been more stable. (Easy to setup for the average user, good on total simultaneous connections, and support for Tomato + DD-WRT).

Yes, because that recent incident where they forced everybody's routers to do a firmware update without their consent that disabled most functionality unless they created a cloud linksys account was just the epitome of trust and reliability.

No thanks. I've bought my last Linksys product, I'm not sure if they can ever be trusted again after that debacle.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


Mike2009

join:2009-01-13
Ottawa, ON
kudos:3

I agree with Guspaz about Linksys but Netgear and Asus would be great choices.


MissSherlock

join:2009-05-17
Ontario

Many thanks for all the recommendations.

Should I use the firmware that comes with the Asus RT-66 (current stable version) or use another firmware?

Thanks,



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to MissSherlock

Try the stock firmware first. Only if it doesn't meet your needs should you start looking into custom firmware.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


graniterock

join:2003-03-14
London, ON
reply to MissSherlock

The Asus RT-N66U stock firmware worked really well for me. I did switch to tomato because the stock QOS did not support IP ranges. With tomato it has been super reliable even with quite a few QOS rules.



FiReSTaRT
Premium
join:2010-02-26
Canada
Reviews:
·Velcom
reply to Guspaz

said by Guspaz:

Try the stock firmware first. Only if it doesn't meet your needs should you start looking into custom firmware.

Not saying that this is a bad suggestion, but there are advantages to running a custom firmware.. The one I love the most is that no matter how I change my hardware, the interface stays the same. Love that familiarity. Also, as was previously mentioned, sometimes the manufacturer can push their own crapware in a mandatory update. Thanks, but no thanks.
--
If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.
—George Bernard Shaw


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to MissSherlock

The dangers of custom firmware are the voiding of the warranty, the possible bricking of the router (it kills the router either permanently or beyond the layman's ability to repair), the potential reduction in performance (custom firmwares on the N66U don't perform as well as stock because they're missing some proprietary Broadcom blobs), the potential to not fully support the hardware/features of the router (OpenWRT's UI when I used it on my WNDR3700 didn't properly support the dual radios or the channel bonding)... There are probably others.

Considering that the typical user is going to "set it and forget it" (configure their router once and probably rarely or never touch it again), custom firmware is not recommended for most users. It's a wonderful way to get more functionality out of your routers, but most people simply don't need it.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



silvercat

join:2007-11-07
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..

said by Guspaz:

...
the potential reduction in performance (custom firmwares on the N66U don't perform as well as stock because they're missing some proprietary Broadcom blobs)
...

We have to keep in mind that a custom firmware such as Toastman Tomato will not perform as well as stock N66U firmware -- only while QOS is disabled on the stock firmware. From memory of reading articles on the subject (and i hope i'm correct), when QOS was turned on, in the stock firmware, i believe Tomato performed just as well, or perhaps even better.


Mike2009

join:2009-01-13
Ottawa, ON
kudos:3

I have an N56U and have no issues with the latest firmware.


fparker

join:2008-04-28
Scarborough, ON
reply to Guspaz

the stock firmware on the N66U had 'parental controls'. They worked for 1 day, then the screen refused to display properly (a known flaw), so they were not usable. I replaced the FW with Shibby Tomato, and it is a great product now.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to MissSherlock

Right, but if you don't need parental controls, then that's not really a problem...

If a typical user, especially one who might not be able to fix problems that occur, doesn't need any features beyond the stock firmware, they shouldn't try to replace it. They're going to potentially cause more trouble than it's worth, and they're not going to get any benefit out of it.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


Guru

join:2008-10-01
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

said by Guspaz:

Right, but if you don't need parental controls, then that's not really a problem...

If a typical user, especially one who might not be able to fix problems that occur, doesn't need any features beyond the stock firmware, they shouldn't try to replace it. They're going to potentially cause more trouble than it's worth, and they're not going to get any benefit out of it.

+1

MissSherlock

join:2009-05-17
Ontario

Guspaz, Granite, Firestart, Silvercat, Mike and All,

Many thanks again for all your help.



FiberToTheX
Premium
join:2013-03-14
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..

1 edit
reply to MissSherlock

Try the Merlin Firmware for the RT-66U as I've seen it have more functionality and features than the stock firmware. It also has temperature monitoring and power boosting options.

In the future I'll be moving to a RT-AC66U or either a Netgear R6300 and migrating to Merlin firmware if I move into a condo/loft with FTTH.

Here is the link for Merlin Firmware:

»forums.smallnetbuilder.com/forum···php?f=42


HTCC

join:2013-03-18
Innisfil, ON
reply to MissSherlock

Introducing Small Net Builder's Router Charts 2013

»www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/r···rts/view