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aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

MS policy on re-using activation key

Last night I was almost certain I'd lose my Win8 install, but eventually Win8 repaired itself.
What happens if I want to, or need to reinstall from scratch?
Do they record some kind of 'machine-id' so the key would work on the same machine, or I would need to call in?

This is what happened, BTW: »[hard drive] Win8 SSD drive errors

TIA
--
Wacky Races 2012!



Cudni
La Merma - Vigilado
Premium,MVM
join:2003-12-20
Someshire
kudos:13

Even if you have to change one or 2 components on existing hardware there will be no issues to reactivate (unlikely you'll have to call). You can also try this app
»www.joshcellsoftwares.com/2011/0···ger.html

Cudni
--
"what we know we know the same, what we don't know, we don't know it differently."
Help yourself so God can help you.
Microsoft MVP, 2006 - 2012/13


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

Hmmm...TrendMicro Housecall thinks its a trojan. But no one else does according to VT.


rfnut
Premium
join:2002-04-27
Fisher, IL
kudos:2

Looks like his Feb 9th change log " Fixed AV false positives" , may need more work.


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

I didn't scroll all the way to the bottom to see the change log.

I thought it odd that only Housecall thinks it's a trojan but TrendMicro itself does not.

Symantec Reputation
Suspicious.Insight

The above is dated 2010! He should have gotten Symantec to remove that long ago.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson



takeahike
Premium
join:2005-01-07
Woodland Hills, CA
reply to aurgathor

My understanding is that generally re-activation is allowed with the same key after 6 months. The whole thing continually creates headaches, more so in XP (seems with 7 they've loosened things a bit so you can attempt repairs--geee). The other day I couldn't get any icons on a machine so I was hoping it might run in safe mode so I could backup up the client's Quicken and Quickbooks before formatting. Since the client had apparently tried to reload with another Windows version it said: oh no, you must activate first and activation is not possible in safe mode, so restart in our useless regular mode.
--
"The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry . . . " --Robert Burns


Gem
Premium
join:2005-09-10
kudos:4

Reply to "takeahike":

1) where is it written that reactivation of W8 after six months is okay?

2) what about examining your client's computer using W8 in "audit mode"? Is that still an option for Windows operating systems?


Gem
Premium
join:2005-09-10
kudos:4
Reviews:
·CableOne
reply to Cudni

said by Cudni:

You can also try this app
»www.joshcellsoftwares.com/2011/0···ger.html

Cudni

what`will that product do for us that a normal restoration of a ghost or true image backup will not do?


takeahike
Premium
join:2005-01-07
Woodland Hills, CA
reply to Gem

I've read about the six months somewhere but can't seem to find it now (this was long before Win 8--I'm assuming it was at least then a general policy applicable to all MS activations). I never knew about audit mode but I'm gonna look into it and see what it can do. The system I was working on had XP.
--
"The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry . . . " --Robert Burns



sekim
Premium,MVM
join:1999-08-17
Saint Petersburg, FL
kudos:1

eons ago; I remember reading that MS kept track of your 5 hardware items for the activation test for 6 months. Sort of meaning after every 6 months you could change your motherboard or whatever was the verifying hardwares without the utoh loss on re-activation.

Lot of bs out there though, so its always hard to be certain of truths.


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to aurgathor

Six month requirement? It's all just speculations.

Where is the document, that specifies the terms of usage (and particularly, activation) of the product, you've purchased?

It looks like we live in one-sided world, where everyone has to agree to EULA terms, protecting vendor. But no one knows the rights, coming with the purchase. Why is that?
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



takeahike
Premium
join:2005-01-07
Woodland Hills, CA

1 edit

said by OZO:

It looks like we live in one-sided world, where everyone has to agree to EULA terms, protecting vendor. But no one knows the rights, coming with the purchase. Why is that?

It's called a contract of adhesion and it's about as old as the hills. Every once in a hundred years or so someone gets to beat one. See: »www.wired.com/politics/law/comme···Page=all and »www.creators.com/opinion/susan-e···ero.html
--
"The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry . . . " --Robert Burns

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to aurgathor

I think we need laws put in place that in order to be considered a valid legal document, that EULAs on consumer software and equipment must be written in plain and clear english at a normal font size and only requiring one page.

Honestly if you cannot state your point in one page, The customer will not read it.

Of course that is the point. To make EULAs so twisted and confusing that the customer has no clue and just clicks yes.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to OZO

said by OZO:

Six month requirement? It's all just speculations.

Where is the document, that specifies the terms of usage (and particularly, activation) of the product, you've purchased?

It looks like we live in one-sided world, where everyone has to agree to EULA terms, protecting vendor. But no one knows the rights, coming with the purchase. Why is that?

It can be worse. I installed Media Center for Win 8 Pro when Microsoft was offering it free to Win 8 Pro users. I reasonably (at least it seemed reasonable to me) thought I was adding Media Center to Win 8. Nothing more. Nothing less. (I was getting it for free because I requested a key for it and installed it before the Jan 31, 2013 deadline). Instead, I now have a NEW VERSION of Windows 8 with a NEW Windows 8 key that was silently activated after I installed Media Center.

I didn't realize any of this until I happened to stumble over the new key on my computer about a month after I installed Media Center but never used it. The key is the Media Center key I received by email from Microsoft when I requested it last December. But my surprise was that on my computer it claims it is a key for Windows 8 Pro not Media Center software only.

So, I read the EULA carefully and became very confused. The Eula says I have a NEW version of Windows 8 Pro. HUH? I no longer have an OEM version of Windows 8 Pro. HUH? I have the legal right to REMOVE this version of Windows 8 Pro with Media Center from this computer and put it on another computer that I own. HUH? The hardware and software extended warranties that I purchased from Dell when I bought this machine last November are null and void. HUH?

None of that makes the slightest sense. Plus, if true, it is very alarming as all my rights regarding Dell warranties were trashed and I don't know what the heck would happen if I ever need to reinstall Windows 8 Pro. Can Microsoft legally trash my PAID FOR EXTENDED WARRANTIES without making that crystal clear to me? I have a Windows 8 Pro Reinstallation USB Flash drive that Dell sent me. I also have restore media partition on the hard drive. If Microsoft Media Center installer was able to remove my personal Windows 8 Pro OEM key from the BIOS...that is even more disturbing for many reasons. What happens now that I finally got a blank USB Flash drive so I can make a backup that Dell software keeps bugging me to do?

I had NO idea about any of this. I thought I was installing free software and that was ALL I was doing. I wonder if were to turn it off (it is under Windows Features in the Control Panel) would that give me back my Dell Win 8 Pro Key? I actually assumed I could uninstall Media Center if I decided I didn't want it but to my surprise I can't. I never had Media Center because my previous machine has XP Pro so I didn't even really know what it was.

To confuse me further about Microsoft Eula, several people have posted about this in Microsoft's own forums and Dell forum and evidently not everyone got their Win 8 Pro OEM key trashed by Microsoft Media Center installer. So, did mine really get trashed? No one seems to know in those forums.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson

Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3

Your Dell warranty is not voided, no matter what you think you read in the EULA for Med Center. The Dell Warranty covers the Hardware no matter what OS you are running.

Software can NOT damage hardware. It can Tax it, like games, but it can not cause Physical damage to any hardware. If the real problem wasn't already a manufacturing defect and that is what the Warranty covers, Manufacturing defects.

Unlike in the movies there is no Key Combo or disc you can insert or program you can run on any computer that can cause physical damage to the hardware in a computer and make it burst into flames.
Not Even MS Media Center Windows 8.

If and when you feel like Reinstalling the Original version of Windows that came on your Dell just POP in the Disc you either got from Dell or the disc or USB Thumb drive that you made from the Dell Utility for making the system disc and wipe the drive and Reinstall.
If the HDD fails before the warranty is up I guaranty Dell will either send you a new drive, since you are in Hawaii, or a box to ship the tower back to them and change the drive without ever really booting the system up. That would take to much time and as we all know Time Is Money.
--
Shooter Ready--Stand By BEEP ********


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

1 edit

No, you are INCORRECT. I did not purchase a BASIC warranty. A basic warranty (like what you are talking about) is NOT even AVAILABLE for purchase from Small and Medium Business or Home divisions for this higher end computer. (Or wasn't when I purchased in the middle of November 2012. Dell may have changed that since Christmas time sales).

My Dell Small and Medium Business (not home business) PREMIUM WARRANTY covers hardware and software for THREE YEARS RENEWABLE FOR ANOTHER TWO which I will do at the time for renewal. (This computer is classified with Alienware for purposes of hardware and software support).

The SSD drive (Samsung mSATA 256GB) will have to last 5 YEARS or Dell will send a tech to install a new motherboard. My warranty INCLUDES NEXT BUSINESS DAY IN HOME REPAIR (although being in Hawaii it is never "next day" rather a week or more). I also have a special, dedicated line to XPS 8500 tech support that is guaranteed to be answered within 2 minutes. The techs are excellent and a supervisor takes the line after you and the tech are finished to ask you about the performance of the tech and your satisfaction/dissatisfaction, etc.

There is a HUGE difference between buying from Dell Home Division as compared to buying from any of their other divisions. I bought this computer through Dell Small and Medium Business Member Purchase Program so my Premium Support is through MPP which is a department of Small and Medium Business Division.

I have always bought from Small and Medium Business division. Folks are naive to buy from Dell Home division as it sucks. Dell has announced after they went private that they are getting out of the home computer business.

Now do you understand why I am upset? I thought I was installing some free software from Microsoft. Instead, I got a "NEW" OS and Dell is not going to be happy about it. Yeah, I have a pure reinstallation (not recover) USB Flash drive for Win 8 Pro Dell OEM that was sent to me (along with a USB Flash drive for Windows 7 Pro if I decide to downgrade) but I don't want to reinstall Windows and then I have to install all the Dell software and drivers and etc...UGH! Just because I installed what should be a piece of software from Microsoft where they are not clear that doing it meant I had a "new" OS? That is absurd.

I have been told that Microsoft has REMOVED MY OEM Win 8 key from the motherboard. If true, how would I be able to use the Win 8 Pro Reinstallation flash drive Dell sent me? Dell would have to contact Microsoft and get permission for a NEW key! Dell has already had to do this when they have to replace the hard drive on this computer for other customers. It means a LONG wait according to forum threads because Dell can't just send a tech with a new drive (for those who did not purchase the XPS 8500 with a large enough SSD for the OS to be installed on it) or a new motherboard for those who purchased the 256GB Samsung mSATA drive and the OS is installed on it -XPS 8500 Special Edition). It is a big headache for both Dell and the customer who has to wait forever with no computer. And all caused by Microsoft. And now there is this crap about Media Center meaning a new OS again screwing the customer and the OEM.

For that matter, if I were to use the recovery on the Dell partition would that work? I was afraid Microsoft had removed that also but it looks intact. But if Microsoft removed my key from the motherboard then the Recovery partition would be unusable until Dell could get a new key from Microsoft! What Microsoft has done with licensing for Windows 8 has caused an insane mess for OEMs and their customers and claiming Media Center software is a NEW OS with OEM key removed just compounds the nightmare.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3

You are wrong. There is no warranty on software. There is Support For Software and MS dumps all support for all their software on to OEM builder when that builder supplies OEM software.

So what you are saying is if you change any software that came with the system your original warranty for both the software and hardware is now no Good, void, Out the Window, Ka-put.

No that is incorrect.

Not really sure why you would think that no matter what any software EULA stated. Your warranty is with Dell not Microsoft.
So if I install an Adobe or a Microsoft or a Oracle software product on my Dell notebook and the Adobe, Microsoft or Oracle EULA states that by installing this software the manufacturers warranty on the hardware in the system is now null and void you think that is true.

That is just foolish and very naive.
First off If I have a problem with the hardware how would Dell know I installed any software that had an EULA that stated that. I know we are all connected but Dell or anyone else is not looking over my shoulder or has access to my PCs to see what I am doing on them.
--
Shooter Ready--Stand By BEEP ********



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Shootist

said by Shootist:

Software can NOT damage hardware.

That is wrong. There are quite a few examples of SW damaging HW, sometimes due to bugs, other times due to system level oversight, and in some cases intentionally.

I have personally wrecked over a half dozen SSDs with a less than 30 lines long batch file and a utility program. Initially by accident (there was a bug in the SSD FW), later intentionally. »degradation of SSDs

While it shouldn't happen with modern monitors, sometimes monitors were destroyed if the video card was set incorrectly.

A long time ago I also destroyed a FH 10 meg HD by trying to seek beyond it's physical limits. (it actually went 3 - 4 cylinders over, but around 5 - 6 I've heard a click, and said drive never worked afterwards.

Lastly, just search for a word "bricked"....
--
Wacky Races 2012!

Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3

Please point out where and when a piece of software has Physically damage a piece of hardware and exactly what that software is.

It can make the computer not function and or crash but it can not damage the hardware. Once that piece of software is removed and or the Operating system reinstalled the hardware will be fine and will start to function properly again.

Do you think any computer manufacture would give a warranty of any kind on the hardware they sell if a software program you installed could physically damage the hardware they sold you.

So the hardware in those SSDs was faulty, IE the firmware that controls the hardware that the Manufacturer supply. But I guaranty if the memory chips were taken out of those faulty SSDs, wiped clean and put in another system that did not have faulty firmware controlling them they would still function.

Heat is about the only thing that can damage hardware.

Your reference to Monitor again is not software. It is User Error.
Again the hard drive YOU damaged was not caused by Software, Again User Error.

In all cases that someone Bricked there system it was from doing something the system was not designed to do and the USER Forced it. Software does not do that USERS do.
--
Shooter Ready--Stand By BEEP ********



seaman
Premium
join:2000-12-08
Seattle, WA

said by Shootist:

Please point out where and when a piece of software has Physically damage a piece of hardware and exactly what that software is.

Iran
2010
Stuxnet

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to Shootist

You don't know what you are talking about. You are very naive regarding Dell. It is obvious you have never been in Dell Hell and thus you are not qualified to speak about this.

Further, I didn't ADD NEW SOFTWARE. That is what I thought I was doing. Instead, I OBTAINED A NEW OS THAT HAS ZERO TO DO WITH DELL. The support for the new OS comes from Microsoft.

I wrote a long reply but it is not wise for me to explain it further to you.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


Shootist
Premium
join:2003-02-10
Decatur, GA
kudos:3

No I've never been in Dell hell and have dealt with Dell on a few occasions always with a good outcome. Even after changing the OS and installing many programs on a Dell computer and then having NO Problems getting service for a failed piece of hardware. In fact on 2 different notebooks that I bought as Refurbs that still had the Complete Care warranty left on them. They, Dell, basically Rebuilt the systems with new case parts and motherboards putting them back to AS NEW. And on another that the screen went bad and that was replaced Next Business day at my place of work. And then with my present Dell E6420 that had soome spots on the screen, Dead Pixels. I did get the full Completecare on that system so I had to send it in. Dell sent me a box to ship it back and I got it back in less then a week. Completely fixed. On the newest notebook I had replaced the original drive with a SSD, removed the 2GBs of RAM I order it with and install 8GBs and installed a second HDD in the Media bay in a caddy I did not buy from Dell. I put all the original parts back in before sending it to them and Not a Word was said to me in any way that the "Hardware" Warranty was Void.

I have since replaced the CPU with an i7, it came with an i5, and increased the RAM to 16GBs.
If an when I have any more problems with that system I will do the same. Call Dell , explain the problem, They will send me a box, I will Replace all the original parts with the ones I have installed and send it in. It will be fixed and sent back to me without one word of any Voiding of the Warranty.
That is IF Dell is still in business at that time.

You are very mistaken in your opinion an attitude about what you can and can't do to a Dell computer and still have the warranty honored.
It Is a Hardware Warranty.
Right the MS Media center OS, SOFTWARE, is now covered by Microsoft support and not Dell as it is not longer the OEM OS.

But the Dell Hardware warranty is still in affect.
--
Shooter Ready--Stand By BEEP ********



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Shootist

said by Shootist:

Please point out where and when a piece of software has Physically damage a piece of hardware and exactly what that software is.

One of the most famous one was already posted.

Another one is the Mars lander that failed to land due to a SW error.

It can make the computer not function and or crash but it can not damage the hardware. Once that piece of software is removed and or the Operating system reinstalled the hardware will be fine and will start to function properly again.

The original quote was "hardware".

In any case, I can safely say that you wouldn't be able to install the intended OS onto the SSDs I wrecked. I tried.

Do you think any computer manufacture would give a warranty of any kind on the hardware they sell if a software program you installed could physically damage the hardware they sold you.

The fact that most manufacturers allow users to install CPU, memory, add-in cards, and some even allow overclocking, voltage tweaking, etc., that is a clear indication that they don't prohibit activities that can potentially lead to HW damage. I agree that for an average Blow Joe it is much easier to mess up his HW the old fashioned way than with SW (the latter requires quite a bit of knowledge, and possibly work) but that doesn't mean it is not possible.

So the hardware in those SSDs was faulty, IE the firmware that controls the hardware that the Manufacturer supply. But I guaranty if the memory chips were taken out of those faulty SSDs, wiped clean and put in another system that did not have faulty firmware controlling them they would still function.

It wouldn't even require as much, just re-initializing the whole thing in the factory, but since the company has yet to provide me the proper SW (I don't think they have it at all for PCs)

But since the memory chips are BGA on those SSDs, desoldering, for the most part, is not a viable option for most.

Heat is about the only thing that can damage hardware.

Heat is only one thing that can damage HW.

Your reference to Monitor again is not software. It is User Error.
Again the hard drive YOU damaged was not caused by Software, Again User Error.

So you want to redefine the question to SW that runs without any input from as user? You should've done this beforehand, not after my counterexamples. If there's a SW, that is usually operated by a human, or set up by a human.

In all cases that someone Bricked there system it was from doing something the system was not designed to do and the USER Forced it. Software does not do that USERS do.

I have seen (and investigated) quite a few cases when bricking was not due to user error.
--
Wacky Races 2012!