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xech

join:2012-11-22

Comcast 1Gbps Service

Hi Guys, If comcast has fiber network all over the country, why doesn't it provide 1Gbps internet and uses carppy coaxial RF conversion from the fiber node, why doesn;t it use fiber to the home like fios so there is no loss.



gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4

1 recommendation

not enough fibers to go around. thats why its limited to businesses....in the future when more sophisticated WDM methods come out, i suspect them to move closer to offering a premium residential service on fiber, but with a hefty price tag.

its also not just the fiber but you have to add recievers/transmitters, and potentially more cards on the CMTS.

also on fiber there is loss, way less, which is why you can run it great distances, you also have to look at the maintenance costs of it as well, and time. When a piece of hardline gets cut i can have it repaired in around 15 minutes from pulling up in my truck, to shrinking it up; try that with fiber!
--
I'm better than you!


xech

join:2012-11-22

1 edit

Bussiness internet 1 Gbps is available everywhere but it's just ridculous price tag, I don't think comcast will have 1Gbps even if they are able to, they are making lots of money limiting connections to like 20, 30,105,305Mbps. They do have enough money to roll out 1 Gbps at like $70 like google fiber, They just will not do it. I don't get it Comcast is the richest cable company with more than $60 Billion on revenue they have more money than verizon does, I think they just want to make money over providing top speed



owlyn
Premium,MVM
join:2004-06-05
Newtown, PA
reply to xech

Because fiber is a money loser. The cost of implementation is high, and it takes forever to recoup the cost. Even Verizon has stopped rolling it out.


rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA

Still rolling it out up in allentown and word is they are getting ready to roll it out in easton. Of course in them areas they are not competing with comcast.


JoeHemi

join:2011-05-06
united state

And in the areas like Seattle, where Comcast is the big dog, Verizon stopped rolling it out a few years ago. Literally left the fiber spooled on the poles, and the ditches unfilled. Frontier bought out everything they had here except for the wireless portion so they could pick up where Verizon left off. Now Frontier is struggling to stay in business here. Comcast has no plans on fiber to the home. Right now their only goal of eliminating coax is at the headend. Once the CCAP gets implemented, soon, the RF combining/splitting will be a thing of the past in the headend but the conversion at the node will not change for many many MANY years if ever.



TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect

1 recommendation

reply to xech

Even if you actually get a 1gbps connection, you're only going to see 800mbps on 1000 Base-TX Ethernet. You would need 10G to get the full speed, not to mention your computer would need to be operating from a RAMDISK to overcome the speed limitations of hard drives.
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


FactChecker
Premium
join:2008-06-03
reply to xech

Even if you get 1G to the home, Internet servers can't deliver that level of speed across consumers. YouTube can't even deliver across the current speeds of broadband. The bottleneck is moving to the servers.

Here's a question... How many people have 1G at work, but have an equal or better experience with their broadband service at home?
--
"Too often we... enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." - John F. Kennedy



owlyn
Premium,MVM
join:2004-06-05
Newtown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by FactChecker:

Here's a question... How many people have 1G at work, but have an equal or better experience with their broadband service at home?

(Hand raised).

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to FactChecker

Is that really a fair comparison though? A typical work environment that has a 1 Gbps or better connection usually has more users than the average home user with many different types of traffic on the local segments prior to hitting the "The Internet".



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
reply to xech

I'm kind of surprised Comcast isn't offering 1Gbit service for their 305/65 fiber tier.

Maybe someday



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to gar187er

said by gar187er:

i suspect them to move closer to offering a premium residential service on fiber, but with a hefty price tag.

They already do. $319/mo (CPE included).

said by gar187er:

its also not just the fiber but you have to add recievers/transmitters, and potentially more cards on the CMTS.

I think their current residential service doesn't use the CMTS at all. The only reason I could see needing a CMTS is if Comcast deployed RF over glass.

Pretty sure the current offering is straight into a Juniper MX series router. Although there could be a layer 2 switch somewhere in-between. I can't see port cost being the real issue here.

As you pointed out, the biggest cost is going to be in man-hours for initial installation and repairs. Splicers ain't cheap!


AnonMan

@comcast.net
reply to xech

said by TheTechGuru:

Even if you actually get a 1gbps connection, you're only going to see 800mbps on 1000 Base-TX Ethernet. You would need 10G to get the full speed, not to mention your computer would need to be operating from a RAMDISK to overcome the speed limitations of hard drives.

This isn't exactly true. A gigabit nic will handle just as much traffic as the gigabit port feeding given one is not doing any fancy converting of the traffic to another type. That said ALL network traffic has overhead and no one will ever see the exact rates. Just like WiFi gives about 60% of it's actual speeds.

Also as for the hard drive statement, that isn't much of an issue anymore neither. Most newer laptops are now shipping with SSD and they are also getting cheaper and more are putting them in desktops also.

The issue these days will be limited to servers hosting content as even if the server was on a 10G connection if 10 1G users started to pull data they would bottleneck it right up.

More speed these days is more for multitasking. Such as you playing a game while a kid downloading a file and wife watching a streaming movie etc.. So in cases like this more speed is wonderful.

Speeds are getting to the point where faster doesn't really need to happen for something to happen faster but more for you to be able to do more at once. While things happening faster are great the above will ALWAYS be true (server speed limits).


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect



The Gigabit download speed is being limited by my laptop's hard drive write speed. There are no limits on the server side as the speed test files are on a RAM drive.

I can't figure out where my upload bottleneck is.

Google Fiber + A desktop with 128GB of RAM and windows running from a RAM drive would be just awesome.

--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to TheTechGuru

Click for full size
Gigabit Ethernet is capable of a bit more than that. You'd likely run into other bottlenecks first.

Here's a 3 GB file transfer from my main PC to my HTPC downstairs (Vertex 3 SSD in my main PC, Octane in my HTPC). Two gigabit switches in the mix, jumbo frames disabled.
--
KI6RIT


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
reply to TheTechGuru

what year do you live in

my seagate 3tb drive can write at 138 MB/s

also ssds can easily do more



TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect

said by JigglyWiggly:

what year do you live in

my seagate 3tb drive can write at 138 MB/s

also ssds can easily do more

My hard drives are only 5400 RPM WD green's. (500GB in desktop, 1.5TB in server)

I get about 65MB/sec read/write with them (that translates to about 520mbps).

I'd also imagine most people that have OEM computers that are not the top end also only have 5400 RPM hard drives.

I do need to invest in a WD Black 500GB for a OS drive soon.
--
CompTIA Network+ Certified


camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to JigglyWiggly

said by JigglyWiggly:

...my seagate 3tb drive can write at 138 MB/s...

 
The WD VelociRaptors are also speedy little critters. Some benchmarks have clocked their read/write speeds over 200MB/s.


dolphins
Clean Up Our Oceans
Premium
join:2001-08-22
Westville, NJ
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to xech

A bit off topic but, my son worked for Verizon for a short time. He told me sometimes they burn the fibers when joining commercial cabling (backbone) making them unusable. I would think that if enough of them are burnt it would begin to cause bottlenecks in the future.
--
Stop The Mindless Killings Stop Over Fishing



tigerpaw509

join:2011-01-19
reply to xech

It's called the last mile


n_w95482
Premium
join:2005-08-03
Ukiah, CA
reply to TheTechGuru

I've worked on some pretty cheap PCs and all of them had 7200 RPM drives. There's definitely some out there but I don't think they're very common.

Some of the 5400 RPM drives are pretty quick with sequential transfers too. I picked up a 3 TB WD Green a little over two years ago, and in an eSATA enclosure, it does right around 120 MB/sec in HDTach, 136 MB/sec in CrystalDiskMark.
--
KI6RIT