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NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to 08034016

Re: Time warner Lying!!!

said by 08034016:

I came across this article for you Time Warner Customer's, they state you dont want 1GIG download/Fiber.

so its of my opinion that you flood time warner with calls asking them why are they lying!!!!

SHOW OF HANDS WHO WOULD LOVE TO HAVE THIS SPEED!!!!

I sit here quietly, hand folded in lap. It isn't that I don't want 1 GB Internet, just that I'd rather have $40 Internet.

My ISP, Sonic.net, LLC, is already deploying fiber in Sebastopol, California. Their pricing structure is 1 GB for $70, and 100 MB for $40 per month. I would gladly take their 100 MB tier if they would deploy fiber here, in San Jose, California.

BTW, the biggest headache Sonic.net is facing with their planned fiber deployment in San Francisco, California, is the local NIMBYs; the same ones who halted AT&T's U-verse deployment by a lawsuit. Getting the requisite permits is proving to be the hardest barrier to the buildout.

Meanwhile, the State of California plans to squander $68 billion on HSR, while HSI languishes in this state.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

said by NormanS:

Meanwhile, the State of California plans to squander $68 billion on HSR, while HSI languishes in this state.

OT, but you should do more research on HSR systems. There is not one HSR system in the world that has been completed that is considered a failure. It's something that the US is in dire need of and I'm proud of our state for spearheading the movement.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

said by Suit Up:

OT, but you should do more research on HSR systems. There is not one HSR system in the world that has been completed that is considered a failure. It's something that the US is in dire need of and I'm proud of our state for spearheading the movement.

California's will be the first; assuming that the state manages to find all the money they need; they are supposedly broke!!!. A bunch of politicians and amateurs who turned down the expert advice of the TGV, because the French found flaws with California's proposal. And the experts behind the success of the Shinkansen didn't even get a listen from the Californio rubes.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15
reply to Suit Up

said by Suit Up:

I'm proud of our state for spearheading the movement.

What exactly do you think the HSR in California is going to do? It's already been watered down so much it isn't even "high speed".


Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

said by DrDrew:

What exactly do you think the HSR in California is going to do?

I expect it to provide a popular alternative to short haul flights, such as those between LAX and SFO when people see how much easier it is and more comfortable it is than flying. And this will lead to further HSR lines to replace short haul flights (such as those in the BOS-NYC-PHI-DC corridor) throughout the country. And I'm not saying this will happen over-night. It might take 50 or 100 years before you see any real progress made.

said by DrDrew:

It's already been watered down so much it isn't even "high speed".

Where did you hear that? I have not heard of any reductions of top speed. The trip from LA to SF is still going to be roughly the same time (15 minutes longer isn't a deal breaker for me).


DrDrew
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join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:15

The 2012 HSR Business plan has extensive plans for "blending" of HSR with existing local rail lines (which were never made to handle 80+ mph trains): »www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov/asset···dec7.pdf

Between the blended approach, numerous stops, and the length of route, a trip from Los Angeles to San Fransisco is estimated by groups reviewing the plan to be around 5-6 hours now when it might be completed in 25-30 years.

If people want quick they jump on a plane and be there in about 1 hour, today. If they want cheap, they jump in their car and be there in about 7 hours.

--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.



Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

While not perfect, the blended system is a way to get the line up and running faster (and I'm not saying I think it's the best way). It does not stop the trains from traveling at 300+ km/h on the HSR dedicated tracks. And even in Europe, the trains don't/can't travel at their fastest speeds in urban areas. But the dedicated HSR track will eventually be built completely from Union Station in LA to the Transbay Terminal in SF (they plan to build 4 tracks between SJ and SF enabling the HSR to bypass the slower CalTrain so the trains can run at higher speeds through there, but even if that corridor was dedicated only to HSR they still wouldn't be able to go 300+ km/h). Like I said, it might take a long time before it's completed, but there will come a time when it is.

And no, jumping on a plan does not take an hour. Sure the flight between LAX and SFO is only around 45 minutes, but checking bagage, going through security, boarding the plane, deboarding the plane, and finally waiting to get your baggage back all adds up. It usually takes 3 hours out of your day anyway.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
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Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

said by Suit Up:

Sure the flight between LAX and SFO is only around 45 minutes, but checking bagage, going through security, boarding the plane, deboarding the plane, and finally waiting to get your baggage back all adds up. It usually takes 3 hours out of your day anyway.

And giving TSA the same authority for boarding trains will introduce the same delay.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

said by NormanS:

And giving TSA the same authority for boarding trains will introduce the same delay.

There is no reason to do so. But if the feds were crazy enough to mandate it for the trains, then yes that will kill HSR.


DrDrew
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SoCal
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said by Suit Up:

said by NormanS:

And giving TSA the same authority for boarding trains will introduce the same delay.

There is no reason to do so.

You don't think a 100+ mph train loaded with hundreds of passengers traveling through a densely populated urban area like Los Angeles would be a likely terrorist target the TSA might be interested in protecting at some point? I'm surprised they don't do more blatant security checks on them already.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.


Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

The speed the train travels at doesn't make a difference (in fact a faster travelling train would actually make it harder for a terrorist to successfully explode a bomb at the correct target). Anyway, there's a difference between a plane which can be hijacked and taken anywhere and a train which must follow the tracks. Terrorists would rather blow up cars and busses which can be maneuvered into whatever position they want, have the vehicle stopped, and then explode it. Trains are not a big terrorist target for that reason, and that is why security on trains is not as tight as for planes. Seriously, do you HSR opponents not realize that there are HSR rail systems successfully running in other countries? We don't have to reinvent the wheel here... we just have to adopt the model they have adopted.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

said by Suit Up:

Seriously, do you HSR opponents not realize that there are HSR rail systems successfully running in other countries? We don't have to reinvent the wheel here... we just have to adopt the model they have adopted.

So why did we not accept the advice offered by TGV?
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA

said by NormanS:

So why did we not accept the advice offered by TGV?

That I can not tell you as I don't know all the particulars of what made the CAHSR board make certain decisions. Like I mentioned earlier, I don't agree with everything they've done or think that they've made the best choices in every situation. But that doesn't mean the project will be a complete failure.

James_C

join:2007-08-03
Florence, KY
reply to DrDrew

No a train wouldn't be a likely terrorist target. Train station maybe (like any populated area) but not so much the train itself. High profile/wealthy people don't ride trains in great numbers. Killing a few lower and middle class citizens is not a terrorist priority. Think about who was in the towers they hit. Further, if you understand how bombs work, the last thing a sane terrorist (OK, maybe they aren't sane but anyway...) would want to do is set one off in a train car for maximum damage.

It would somewhat contain the explosion, limit the expected kill zone to that and possibly adjacent cars. A bomb in a train doesn't wipe out the surrounding city, at most it might derail the train assuming it's not nuclear and if it is, no need at all to get it on a train. They'd do (worse) at any random public event. As for seizing control of a train, all they can do there is speed it up but they can't target anyone with it unlike with planes.



DrDrew
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SoCal
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Terrorist attacks are to incite terror, going after things people do everyday and/or think of as safe and secure. It's to make people feel vulnerable and change what they do.

9/11 was about damaging "untouchable" symbols. Twin towers, Pentagon, Capitol Building or White House (target of the plane that crashed in PA). All are well known the world over as symbols of American ability, military, and government. It wasn't about killing the wealthy, name the rich people killed that day? Nothing generic like "stock traders" now... Do you think any non-Americans can? Now show people, even non-Americans, pictures of the buildings and I bet a large number can name them and where they are. At the very least they'll know they're American buildings.

Large terrorist event have previously targeted trains, specifically commuter trains like the HSR in California is supposed to be:
2010 in Moscow: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Mosco···bombings
2006 in Mumbai: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/11_July_20···bombings
2005 in London: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7_July_200···bombings
2004 in Madrid: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Madri···bombings
1995 in Tokyo: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarin_gas_···o_subway
Lots more here: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_te···_systems

If the California HSR is ever finished, it'll be a symbol of American accomplishment, filled with Americans. If it's attacked, it'll be major news.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.


James_C

join:2007-08-03
Florence, KY

Things are different now in the US. The US was a desired target and a train would've been far easier than the (alleged, let's not get into that...) terrorist takeover of the airliners. Further, besides the nuts in CA, trains are not a primary public transportation method in the US.

Yes they are extensively used if you include subways, but on the scale of things knocking out a train car - rather than a station attack which is just a public gathering that has little to do with there being a train nearby, is just another populated area) - isn't as much collateral damage as occupying a middle eastern country for a few weeks.

Perhaps it would make news but logistically they'd hurt us more knock out a material supply line than a passenger trail.

While it's true that terrorism is about terror, it's not that simple. It's about terror to affect a change. Again we have to look at the significance of what the world trade centers were, it's not at all the same as just making people afraid to ride a train.

If you dismiss that there were wealthy companies in those buildings, reconsider exactly what went on in them. It's not like they randomly picked two buildings, nor picked them only because of their height... but if you want names, here you go -
»www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2001/trade.···ts1.html



Suit Up

join:2003-07-21
Los Angeles, CA
reply to DrDrew

said by DrDrew:

[...]specifically commuter trains like the HSR in California is supposed to be

Uh... no, HSR is not commuter trains. Commuter rail are things like the LA Metro Rail Lines or Metrolink in Los Angeles. Or the NYC Subway, NJ's PATH, Philadelphia's SEPTA, Chicago's L, Boston's T, etc. All of which we currently have in place and do not use TSA security on.