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motorola870

join:2008-12-07
Arlington, TX
kudos:4
reply to andyross

Re: [HD] FIOS Moving to MPEG-4 HD

said by andyross:

said by SpHeRe31459:

I assume some software patch would have to be made yes, it would apply to any STB that can potentially decode MPEG4, I assume the legacy iGuide software/firmware cannot handle MPEG4 transport streams. But I don't know about that for sure.

I don't think iGuide may even care about the MPEG format. That is up to the firmware of the device it's installed on. iGuide just works through an API to that to control the tuners and stuff.

Yes MPEG4 is supported on iGuide boxes as TWC has ESPN3D sent out over SDV in my area using MPEG4. It is evident with TWC where they don't have ESPN3D in most cases they don't have digital simulcast which is required in Motorola areas for MPEG4 as DCX boxes are required for it.


PaulGo

join:2005-01-29
Gaithersburg, MD
reply to andyross
I believe Comcast is already using MPEG-4 on some 3D content. In my area only the boxes that were capable of MPEG-4 could be enabled for 3D.

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

3 edits
reply to motorola870
said by motorola870:

said by andyross:

said by SpHeRe31459:

I assume some software patch would have to be made yes, it would apply to any STB that can potentially decode MPEG4, I assume the legacy iGuide software/firmware cannot handle MPEG4 transport streams. But I don't know about that for sure.

I don't think iGuide may even care about the MPEG format. That is up to the firmware of the device it's installed on. iGuide just works through an API to that to control the tuners and stuff.

Yes MPEG4 is supported on iGuide boxes as TWC has ESPN3D sent out over SDV in my area using MPEG4. It is evident with TWC where they don't have ESPN3D in most cases they don't have digital simulcast which is required in Motorola areas for MPEG4 as DCX boxes are required for it.

Oh yeah, cool. iGuide sort of blurs the line between firmware and software (a lot of iGuide seems to have some pretty low level code to make it work on old memory limited boxes, hence the issues porting to platforms other than Moto i.e. the SA/Cisco boxes and their "S Guide" port) so I wasn't sure what affects the use of MPEG4.
But that makes sense, since an MPEG transport stream is an MPEG transport stream as far as the guide and tuning, etc. go.

said by PaulGo:

I believe Comcast is already using MPEG-4 on some 3D content. In my area only the boxes that were capable of MPEG-4 could be enabled for 3D.

Oh yeah quite right, I forgot about 3D since it's such a non-starter. From checking around it seems some of the 3D channels were delivered in MPEG2 and some were MPEG4.


CAST SUCKS

@comcastbusiness.net
reply to DrDrew
said by DrDrew:

said by BiggA:

FIOS went all-digital a number of years back, so I don't know what you're talking about. They were years ahead of Comcast.

Sorry got a bit mixed up in my description. You're right that FIOS went all digital years ago, but FIOS is pretty much out of video bandwidth due to the way it handles distribution of local and ad insertion feeds. They're slowly going MPEG4, but even though they're several years later into the digital video arena than Comcast they also have a large mass of MPEG2 only equipment they need to replace. They were rumored to be going IPTV but that's run into lots of delays for all the video providers.
said by BiggA:

Why would you need to re-map channels? Just leave them mapped all the time, and pull the stream out from behind them...

If you just pull the video stream, you leave the QAM slot in place. That generates errors on the boxes and edge QAMs. To pull the QAM you have to turn it off at the Edge QAM. To put another channel in it's place you'd have to reconfigure the Edge QAM. If the provider is inserting ads and/or stat muxing the channels so 3 HDs or 10 SDs fit nicely in the available bandwidth, then even more has to be done.

Either way, it's a REAL UGLY way to switch channels to save bandwidth especially if it's done frequently, since "just pulling the stream" doesn't really work.

said by BiggA:

Analog and SDV is an idiotic combination when analog is clearly from the past. Getting rid of analog is the FIRST thing every cable provider should do, THEN MPEG-4, and finally, if they're still short on bandwidth, SDV.

Lots of cable customers still use analog. Getting rid of it drives TONS of complaints and more than a little churn. It also drives providers to boxes purchases, which in todays market of massive guide changes and the requirements to run the new guides, isn't cheap or quick. Also SDV can still run on DCT boxes without a problem unlike MPEG4 or channels above 860 Mhz, which is why OTHER providers have embraced SDV.
said by BiggA:

What is Comcast driving the equipment development for VOD? They seem to love VOD WAY too much.

I didn't say anything about VOD, but it's getting dragged along too since it's generated by the Edge QAM type equipment, same as normal linear QAMs, SDV QAMs, and soon to be DOCSIS QAMs. The backend is very different though.
said by BiggA:

Why is Comcast trying to kludge their way around the simple solution of going MPEG-4?

MPEG4 requires all DCT, DCH, and many CableCARD devices to be replaced along with various pieces of headend gear. Again, not cheap or quick and messing with the usefulness of CableCARD devices usually draws out FCC actions.

The huge installed base of MPEG2 only gear is the main reason why MPEG4 is so slow in being deployed.

Dish and directv turned off there MPEG2 HD a few years ago

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

2 edits
Way to auto quote the entire post, how 'bout you just select the portion you're replying to...

I think Dish may still have some national MPEG2 HD channels around, and I'm pretty sure the HD locals are MPEG2.

»support.dish.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=20
From March 2012:
quote:
Hi, DISH has no plans to end MPEG2 technology for our customers. We do have certain area designated as MPEG4 only upgrade areas. If and when a customer decides to upgrade to HD in these areas they will be moved to an Eastern Arc Installation which is all MPEG4 but customers will still be able to use their MPEG2 set-ups for a SD installation. Please let us know if you have any additional questions or concerns, thank you!

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to DrDrew
FIOS has way more bandwidth than Comcast, they just took the high road with not turning HDs into a pile of compression artifacts. What does local ad insertion have to do with anything? That would be handled regionally before the signal is turned into an 860mhz RF signal running over fiber.

Churn to WHERE? Here in Groton, CT, yes, we have another cable company who is still living in the dark ages, but 99% of places don't. The people who complain are a bunch of old people who aren't that profitable anyways, as they don't have real cable boxes, don't subscribe to a lot of stuff, and don't use XoD.

Right, but what's driving the edge QAM equipment? XoD? That's the main culprit for bandwidth on their systems from what I gather.

The only CableCard devices that don't work with MPEG-2 are TiVo Series 3 because TiVo won't put the software update out for them, and some obscure old MCE tuner cards. TiVo Premiere, the Ceton InfiniTV, and the HDHR series all work fine with it.

There are a decent number of DCT and DCH boxes out there, but it wouldn't be that hard to move channels over block by block to force people off of the old hardware slowly. It's archaic anyways. Sure, there will be a few unhappy campers, but tough nuggies. Comcast could write it off over the course of a few years, and in the whole scheme of their business, it wouldn't cost them much at all. They could also recycle the boxes as SD DVRs, if anyone still subscribes to those. It would really be better to get them out of the houses though, as they are energy hogs, don't provide advanced services well, and require more support since they break all the time.

MPEG-4 would look a lot better, because Comcast wouldn't have to compress the snot out of it to fit in on their system. They could go to 5 HD's per QAM with much higher quality than the current 3 HD's per QAM.

The DCX3400 from Motorola supports MPEG-4. They already work on MPEG-4, as some markets use it for 3D content. There's nothing stopping them from putting more MPEG-4 channels on tomorrow except that some users wouldn't be able to get them, as they have older hardware.

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2
said by BiggA:

There are a decent number of DCT and DCH boxes out there, but it wouldn't be that hard to move channels over block by block to force people off of the old hardware slowly. It's archaic anyways. Sure, there will be a few unhappy campers, but tough nuggies. Comcast could write it off over the course of a few years, and in the whole scheme of their business, it wouldn't cost them much at all. They could also recycle the boxes as SD DVRs, if anyone still subscribes to those. It would really be better to get them out of the houses though, as they are energy hogs, don't provide advanced services well, and require more support since they break all the time.

Totally possible, other providers have done exactly that. I've been saying this exact thing since page 1 of this topic, before it got derailed on SDV.

The other added (eventual) benefit to end users to upgrade is that newer boxes are also going to be X1 Guide software capable.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
One of many, yes.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:16

3 edits
reply to BiggA
said by BiggA :

FIOS has way more bandwidth than Comcast, they just took the high road with not turning HDs into a pile of compression artifacts.

Look at the HD selection of FIOS. Many in the FIOS forums are complaining of missing many HD channels others like Comcast carry. Example: »[HD] Maybe this means more HD will follow....
FIOS has toyed with 3 HDs per QAM and still runs a few that way, otherwise they can't add much HD without taking other channels away. They've recently started pushing toward MPEG4 to help with the situation: »Verizon is Offering to Change STB because of Lineup changes

said by BiggA :

What does local ad insertion have to do with anything? That would be handled regionally before the signal is turned into an 860mhz RF signal running over fiber.

FIOS has about 16 regional headends where the RF is generated. Those each serve multiple cities and DMAs. To provide the local channels and advertising each DMA wants, they use multiple QAMs not available for national feeds. Some are for local ads, some are for local channels, some are for PEG channels, others are set aside for channel insertion at apartments and businesses. Around 24 QAMs just for that... It means not every area has 135 QAMs available in that 860Mhz of space for channels customers can watch, more like 110 QAMs. Couple that with the 2 video streams per QAM vs. 3 per QAM many other cable ops use and you've got limited channel space. See this channel lineup: »Re: Verizon is Offering to Change STB because of Lineup changes or this thread: »Verizon is now using 8 QAM channels for local commercials
said by BiggA :

Churn to WHERE?

Churn to Dish, DirecTV, OTA, FIOS, Uverse... what ever other video provider is in the area. Since new customers to other providers often get promo deals on startup, it frequently comes out cheaper than adding multiple boxes on Comcast.
said by BiggA :

Right, but what's driving the edge QAM equipment?

Not sure I understand the question...
Comcast and other providers want more dense equipment that takes up less space, with more ports per RU, and more QAMs per port. It used to be 1 QAM per RF port, then 4 QAMs per port, now 96 QAMs per port can be had. It allows them to make smaller service groups and provide more targeted bandwidth delivery with less combining and other gear needed. The plans are to make 1 device that generates the multiple QAMs from a port which can be used for linear channels, VOD, SDV, and DOCSIS channels, with possible switching on demand between them. Fewer independent, dedicated function devices make for easier, faster, and cheaper upgrades. »www.multichannel.com/node/139977
said by BiggA :

The only CableCard devices that don't work with MPEG-2 are TiVo Series 3...

You're missing all the CableCARD tvs people are holding on to from 2002-2007. It's not many, but everytime a provider does something that limits the usefulness of CableCARD devices, the FCC seems to get involved. It's the tech that almost no one wants, but we can't seem to get past. FCC rules from 2011 require CableCard customers get all linear channels. That's difficult if your CableCard device doesn't do MPEG4 and the channel is MPEG4: »www.fcc.gov/guides/cablecard-kno···r-rights

Add that to the collection of DCT/DCH boxes which number in the millions and it's a big chunk of change to buy and replace them. Add that to the whole situation with X1 and X2 guides, not even running well on some of the MPEG4 capable boxes. It would seem the whole Comcast cable box situation is really fluid right now. Depending on how things play out they may have to replace everything older than 2 years to support the Guide they want to advance. With other providers hitting the same situation do the box makers have enough capacity? Moto had issues when the whole mandatory CableCard rule went into effect a few years ago. All these little things make mass box changes ugly for providers and customers, and it slows them down to molasses speed.

This can be all moot anyways... I've heard rumors of several open QAMs and growing in many Comcast areas. Doesn't seem like there's a big bandwidth crunch in most Comcast systems at the moment.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3

1 edit
Click for full size
downloadcloudheadend.pdf 246,602 bytes
rough visio diagram
Wow 96 QAMs per port? Thats 3724.8 Mbps worth of data. I guess you have to have a 10GigE input interface (likely dual for redundancy)?

Its kind of like what virtualization does for the IT world. I mean I used to have to manage 25+ physical servers. That's 25 or more pieces of equipment taking up rack space, needing switch ports, power outlets, generating heat, costing energy, etc.. Now I have that consolidated into 3 servers taking up 6U of rack space and a quarter rack of shared storage. Amazing how technology lets us consolidate so much. I have empty racks now

As far as the older set tops running X1... it can be done, though they aren't actually "running" x1. They run a 100kb client from ActiveVideo networks. A server pool actually hosts the guide and the thin client in the box transmits the button presses and displays the output. Think of like how Citrix works or Microsoft Terminal Services / Remote Destkop.

»www.activevideo.com/company-pr-s···p?id=146

I mean businesses are starting to virtualize the desktop now with VDI, so simple thin clients can be deployed to end users. They actually connect to a VDI session in the data center that runs their applications. If this is working for businesses maybe this model could evolve into something in the Cable TV world.

I'm guessing this would require some of those dense eQAMS because it sounds like each set top has its own QAM stream.
Lets say the tuners are all in the headend, and you allocated 3 set top boxes per QAM. In 110 narrowcast QAMs, a node could support 330 individual set top boxes.

That is a bit of expense to re-engineer the plant so all the tuning was done in the headend and the output was just streamed and assigned to a frequency on your particular node. Not sure how that plays out. Almost be easier just to replace all the set tops?

But think of it this way... all the tuning is done in the headend... so its just picking streams off IP... you really have unlimited bandwidth and can launch any channel you have rights to launch at that point.

dishrich

join:2006-05-12
Springfield, IL

3 edits
reply to SpHeRe31459
said by SpHeRe31459:

I think Dish may still have some national MPEG2 HD channels around, and I'm pretty sure the HD locals are MPEG2.

I assure you neither DISH nor DirecTV have ANY MPEG2 HD left - either national or locals - & have NOT for quite some time. DirecTV even converted all the HD distant networks feeds to MPEG4 some time ago, which were the last MPEG2 HD.

Re-read your quote & what I bolded; the only MPEG 2 content left on DISH, are SD channels on Western Arc, as well as SD international on the 118 bird. ALL channels on Eastern Arc are MPEG 4, regardless if HD or SD.
Because of this, NO SD receivers can even be used on Eastern Arc, even if a customer is SD only - as there are NO DISH SD receivers made that do MPEG 4. (this info from the DISH site in your quote is actually incorrect; NOT a first for the DISH site... )

And on DirecTV, if you are in an MPEG4 locals market, ALL of those locals are in MPEG4, even any SD-only locals. (our market is one of those...) Because of this, in ALL these markets, they ONLY install HD receivers - even if you do NOT subscribe to HD (access).

»support.dish.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=20
From March 2012:
quote:
Hi, DISH has no plans to end MPEG2 technology for our customers. We do have certain area designated as MPEG4 only upgrade areas. If and when a customer decides to upgrade to HD in these areas they will be moved to an Eastern Arc Installation which is all MPEG4 but customers will still be able to use their MPEG2 set-ups for a SD installation. Please let us know if you have any additional questions or concerns, thank you!

andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
reply to DrDrew
said by DrDrew:

This can be all moot anyways... I've heard rumors of several open QAMs and growing in many Comcast areas. Doesn't seem like there's a big bandwidth crunch in most Comcast systems at the moment.

Here in the Chicago NW suburbs, they dropped the analogs last summer. Over the winter, they rearranged things quite a bit, and not just moving existing groups to new frequencies. They repackaged many channels. I went through and mapped it all out, and find the following 34 RF's are currently open:
2-6, 14-17, 20-28, 31, 32, 34, 35, 70, 96-99, 108-114.

The modem's currently use 100-107, so 108-114 could be set aside for future expansion. And some, like 96-99 (FM band) would probably be unusable due to interference.

If you are nerdy, you can see all the information here:
»home.comcast.net/~andyross/Schau···nels.zip


JeepMatt
C'mon the U
Premium
join:2001-12-28
Wilmington, DE
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Comcast
Andy-
Totally agree with you. They're sitting on a shit-ton (for lack of better terms) of open QAM's here in the Philly region as well.

Maybe they're going to have a big add at some point this year?? Can only hope...
--
"ONE team - ONE city - ONE dream!!"

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2

1 edit
reply to DrDrew
said by DrDrew:

FCC rules from 2011 require CableCard customers get all linear channels.

But what you're missing there is that all the SD versions would still be MPEG2 and thus still accessible. Which would be a weasely way to fulfill the "letter-of-the-law" (I checked, there is no language in the FCC directive that says it must be access to the HD versions of the channels), if people complained they just get told "sorry your customer owned equipment is too old", but that they'd be happy rent a cable company DVR to them that will access the HD channels, or they can drop the HD access fee and go to a SD cable subscription only.


CAST SUCKS

@comcastbusiness.net
reply to DrDrew
said by DrDrew:

said by BiggA :

FIOS has way more bandwidth than Comcast, they just took the high road with not turning HDs into a pile of compression artifacts.

This can be all moot anyways... I've heard rumors of several open QAMs and growing in many Comcast areas. Doesn't seem like there's a big bandwidth crunch in most Comcast systems at the moment.

well they kill off most of the HBO HD, MAX HD, starz HD, and show HD.

Only have team HD / game 1 HD and 2 HD. No goal line HD.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to DrDrew
It depends on the Comcast system. For example, I don't have ESPNU HD, then again I'm in the bottom 20% of systems to get upgraded, and we're still running a 650mhz system.

HUH? They can't generate different RF feeds from the same SHE for each market? That makes no sense. I get having a QAM set aside for local channel insertion, but more than that is nuts.

Going to another provider that requires boxes on every TV isn't exactly getting around the whole box thing...

My guess is VOD is driving Comcast.

No one is using CableCard TVs. They are useless, since they don't have any way to DVR anything, nor do they have XoD. Also, CableCard works fine with MPEG-4, so the one device that anyone actually has that doesn't, the TiVo Series 3 will just get left behind. Or TiVo could get off their butts and do a software upgrade since the hardware does MPEG-4 just fine.

They could move over to MPEG-4 without having to refresh the majority of their boxes for a new guide, which can happen over time.

If Comcast de-leveraged their tri-muxed HD's, they would be hurting for bandwidth. Also, they have systems like here that are still only 650mhz, although that needs to be addressed before they deal with MPEG-2 vs. MPEG-4.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
said by BiggA:

Going to another provider that requires boxes on every TV isn't exactly getting around the whole box thing...

My guess is VOD is driving Comcast.

No one is using CableCard TVs. They are useless, since they don't have any way to DVR anything, nor do they have XoD. Also, CableCard works fine with MPEG-4, so the one device that anyone actually has that doesn't, the TiVo Series 3 will just get left behind. Or TiVo could get off their butts and do a software upgrade since the hardware does MPEG-4 just fine.

They could move over to MPEG-4 without having to refresh the majority of their boxes for a new guide, which can happen over time.

If Comcast de-leveraged their tri-muxed HD's, they would be hurting for bandwidth. Also, they have systems like here that are still only 650mhz, although that needs to be addressed before they deal with MPEG-2 vs. MPEG-4.

The point is that forcing any sort of equipment/fees on a customer who has been accustomed to not having to deal with that kind of stuff will likely push them to start shopping around. When this happens the customer may switch out of spite, or they may receive acquisition offers that they feel offer better value.

Unless you work for an MSO, I don't think you can know how many cablecard devices that don't support MPEG-4 are in use. Even if it's still a small number of customer, you risk upsetting them and potentially causing churn.

A transition to MPEG-4 as already mentioned, is not just about the CPE, it's all the backend equipment and changes that cost significant time and money. Also boxes that don't have hardware MPEG4 decoders do not have the processing power to do software MPEG4 decoding.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
Maybe there are a few people who are so stupid they would jump, but in reality, there is nothing to be gained on that front since the other companies charge as much or more.

What are these mysterious CableCard devices? Like I said, except for a handful of extremely obscure devices, it's the TiVo Series 3, and that's it. And maybe for Comcast they would update the darn thing. It has a hardware MPEG-4 decoder, the software connection just isn't there to use it with cable content. TiVo, Ceton, and SiliconDust are the only companies that have ever made mainstream CableCard devices (if you even consider Ceton and SiliconDust mainstream). Early CableCard tuners for PCs are highly obscure at this point, they have probably all been upgraded out because of Comcast's per CableCard fees, AND they are easy to modularly replace, since you can just unplug them and put an InfiniTV or HDHR in their place.

Ok, it's part of the constant upgrades they have to do to keep up with technology. Right, every halfway modern box has hardware to do it, and the DCT and DCH series need to go to the recycler anyways, as they are way beyond their reasonable life. A lot of them have 80-160GB hard drives, many don't have HDMI, and so on...


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
reply to yyzlhr
Yeah maybe it would make people stop and think about other providers, but in reality switching providers is a huge pain in the ass.

You have to give all your old equipment back (lose DVR recordings and series), maybe pay for a disconnect fee (not sure). Then you have to coordinate it with the other company so your not out of service for too long between the prior companies disconnect day and time. You likely have to take a day off of work because who knows when the new company gets there. If it's a dish or fiber install, its a few hours of your time. You have to get all new equipment anyway. There's likely an installation fee and for a lot of non-cable providers a 2 year agreement.

I say slowly switch in or just ADD new stuff like all the premium, sports and ethnic packages in HD but say hey we offer this but you need at least one of these HD boxes or DVR's (provide a list). Say the swap is FREE. Even offer to mail it out with a prelabeled return package for the old box. Roll the costs into network improvement. And surely they could write off those DCT-2000's and 2500's off by now?

Because its NEW services added, its at the customers discretion to change or not. Now maybe when 70% of the issued STB's are MPEG4, start simulcasting other services until you get everyone switched out.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
When you're talking about analogue customers they have no equipment to give back. When customers are pissed off, they have no qualms about switching even if it may be inconvenient or costly.

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2
reply to cypherstream
said by cypherstream:

I say slowly switch in or just ADD new stuff like all the premium, sports and ethnic packages in HD but say hey we offer this but you need at least one of these HD boxes or DVR's (provide a list). Say the swap is FREE. Even offer to mail it out with a prelabeled return package for the old box. Roll the costs into network improvement. And surely they could write off those DCT-2000's and 2500's off by now?

Because its NEW services added, its at the customers discretion to change or not. Now maybe when 70% of the issued STB's are MPEG4, start simulcasting other services until you get everyone switched out.

That slow phase in is totally reasonable.

That's way less of a hassle and less immediately felt by customers than all the analog cut offs and total encryption change overs that have been phased in over the last 4 years.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
Yeah, you can work back down from the least popular stuff to the most popular channels over a period of a few months, and people will exchange the equipment. It's also not that drastic, as if people want to wait for whatever reason, they will just lose HD's over time, and still have the SD's and HD locals.


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to cypherstream
I wish there was a job where someone can get paid for being present in peoples home for an installation so they don't have to take off from work, like a surrogate "someone over 18 must be present" person, because I love installations.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
Moving to MPEG-4 has nothing to do with installers, as it's just a box swap that the customer would do by going to the service center and exchanging the boxes.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:16
said by BiggA:

Moving to MPEG-4 has nothing to do with installers, as it's just a box swap that the customer would do by going to the service center and exchanging the boxes.

Yeah.... that works for some, but for others they don't want to touch the box. They want the company to come out and do it.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.

Joe12345678

join:2003-07-22
Des Plaines, IL
reply to BiggA
in some cases the in home wiring / wiring to pole may need to be replaced.

SpHeRe31459
Premium
join:2002-10-09
Sacramento, CA
kudos:2
said by Joe12345678:

in some cases the in home wiring / wiring to pole may need to be replaced.

That really has nothing to do with the move to MPEG4, any wiring issues would still exist regardless of the codec used for the delivery of channels...


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:16
said by SpHeRe31459:

said by Joe12345678:

in some cases the in home wiring / wiring to pole may need to be replaced.

That really has nothing to do with the move to MPEG4, any wiring issues would still exist regardless of the codec used for the delivery of channels...

Actually when you start using higher compression, small problems that weren't noticeable previously might become a noticeable problem. That's the usual tradeoff, higher compression rates for less tolerance on error rates, kinda like QAM64 vs QAM256.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, back it up... Somethimes 99.999% availability isn't even good enough.


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:4
reply to JeepMatt
Does anyone else find it funny that we're talking about something Verizon FiOS has done in a Comcast thread?


cypherstream
Premium,MVM
join:2004-12-02
Reading, PA
kudos:3
Its always good to keep an eye on the competition and compare / contrast.

I have DirecTV but i still keep an eye on Comcast, Fios and a few others just to keep up to date.