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Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

Samsung to Stop Sale of WinRT Tablets in Germany Weak Demand

Samsung will stop sale of Windows RT tablets in Germany due to weak demand, according to reports

quote:
We already know that Samsung was too timid (or maybe too sensible) to launch its Windows RT-based ATIV Tab hybrid in the US, but now it appears the manufacturer is having doubts about European demand too. Heise.de and our friends at MobileGeeks are reporting that Samsung will stop selling its ATIV Tab in Germany -- Europe's biggest economy -- and some other unspecified European countries after speaking to retailers about the level of interest they're seeing for Microsoft's stripped down OS.

.....

»www.engadget.com/2013/03/06/sams···germany/


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
WinRT is a niche that's IMHO going to get squeezed out rapidly as ivy bridge and the "new atom" devices hit the market with similar battery life (less connected standby, which works but is of limited value with 8 day max standby to 0 battery on the RT) and no compromise on what you can run on it.

Don't get me wrong - I *love* my surface RT - it's fantastic in an all-Microsoft enterprise for grab and go to meetings vs. dragging a laptop. It's great for planes. It's fine for media consumption. I'm sure there is at least 100x the demand for RT vs a Linux tablet. Of course that just means there are probably tens to hundreds of people in a metro area who would want a Linux tablet, and hundreds to a few thousand who might want an RT tablet.

Interesting segment? yeah. Volume seller? no.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
I think Windows RT could be more interesting with an increase in ARM platform / processor design and performance.

However, its (WIndows RT) image is irreparably damaged in much the way Windows Vista's image / PR was damaged and that's not to say that either were seriously flawed.

Windows RT would need a facelift and an image lift in the way that subtle changes to Vista gave way to Windows 7,......and mass appeal

One of the main reasons / aversions people reference with respect to Windows RT is its inability to run x86 / x64 programs. However, Google Android and Apple iOS devices cannot run legacy Windows x86 / x64 programs natively either,.....and sell like hotcakes,.... So clearly the ability to run Windows x86 / x64 programs is not an issue to the vast majority of people that buy ARM based devices. So then why would Microsoft be held to a higher standard then Google and Apple on what is essentially the same ARM based hardware,....?

I agree that Atom will likely become a bigger player as it becomes more powerful, power efficient, cooler and smaller. However Intel has their own image problem with Atom. Still I think well see more devices like this pop up:

»www.engadget.com/2013/02/25/asus···nounced/

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=W64oA7-ZeaE


And I think people will get used to them and start to like them as they become the new standard,....or a great option to the standard,....


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
said by Octavean:

clearly the ability to run Windows x86 / x64 programs is not an issue to the vast majority of people that buy ARM based devices. So then why would Microsoft be held to a higher standard then Google and Apple on what is essentially the same ARM based hardware,....?

Apple doesn't sell MountianLionPad... they sell a phone OS pad. Google doesn't sell LinuxNote. They sell a phone OS pad.

Microsoft sells.. WINDOWS 8 rt. WTF is rt? I dunno. Must be windows, I'll buy it and try to run all my existing windows stuff on it. Wait, what?

That is the problem with RT. For $600 you get something called Windows that looks like Windows but doesn't run windows software. I get it. A hand full of others get it. No one else does.

Now, for $600 if you sold a Surface Pro... you'd be golden.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
I hear what your saying but that would be a mistake of the user / customer if they blindly assumed Windows RT / ARM could natively run Windows x86 / x64 code. The same would be true if someone bought an iPad / iPhone (ARM) expecting to run OS X based programs written for modern Intel Mac hardware or any similar incomparable platform ecosystem.

The only exception I can think of offhand is Android running on both x86 / x64 hardware and ARM hardware. In such a case I would consider Androids future on x86 / x64 hardware as uncertain as Windows RT on ARM.

Also anyone expecting a powerful Intel Core i5 PC tablet based on the latest process such as Ivy Bridge or upcoming Haswell (Haswell within approximately 3 months) for ~$600 or so has little to no understanding of current pricing for such hardware.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
said by Octavean:

Also anyone expecting a powerful Intel Core i5 PC tablet based on the latest process such as Ivy Bridge or upcoming Haswell (Haswell within approximately 3 months) for ~$600 or so has little to no understanding of current pricing for such hardware.

No, at that price point you're talking next generation Atom. But Atom gives you backwards binary compatibility (win8, not winrt)
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
There is price overlap in that segment of the market between ARM and Atom. Its still goes back to the individual customer understanding what they are buying in terms of the capabilities of the platform.

ARM devices are typically much more restrictive regardless of OS (iOS, Android, WebOS, Windows RT or other). Intel Atom isn't known for its processing prowess and more powerful x86 / x64 PC tablet solutions often cost ~$1000 USD give or take ~$100.

Windows users typically expect backward compatibility and when its lost there is the question of why one should bother. So Windows users bring a specific set of expectations to the Windows RT table (assuming they understand what Windows RT is capable of and incapable of).

In any event,...

Those that buy such ARM devices, of which there are many as non-Windows RT ARM devices are selling well, don't seem very concerned about the ability to run x86 / x64 Windows programs or the lack thereof.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
said by Octavean:

There is price overlap in that segment of the market between ARM and Atom. Its still goes back to the individual customer understanding what they are buying in terms of the capabilities of the platform.

ARM devices are typically much more restrictive regardless of OS (iOS, Android, WebOS, Windows RT or other). Intel Atom isn't known for its processing prowess and more powerful x86 / x64 PC tablet solutions often cost ~$1000 USD give or take ~$100.

Windows users typically expect backward compatibility and when its lost there is the question of why one should bother. So Windows users bring a specific set of expectations to the Windows RT table (assuming they understand what Windows RT is capable of and incapable of).

In any event,...

Those that buy such ARM devices, of which there are many as non-Windows RT ARM devices are selling well, don't seem very concerned about the ability to run x86 / x64 Windows programs or the lack thereof.

There is a new Atom. Same bad name, hopefully better performance. This is what I think is going to kill RT off. Why compromise at all if you can get the same battery life including connected standby, while still being x86 compatible?

»www.anandtech.com/show/6790/inte···mwc-2013
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
Intel is committed to Atom and improving upon its performance / design is about expected as doing the same for its other offerings. Intel knows it needs to compete with ARM and its champion in this space is Atom.

Intel probably has an easier job of reinventing / reinvigorating the Atom name then Microsoft has with Windows 8.

Seeing the growing popularity of ARM hardware, it made sense for Microsoft to attempt a compatible OS offering for ARM. It doesn't mean it will do well in an already full market though. It wouldn't make sense for Microsoft to simply put all its eggs in Intel's basket. If Intel doesn't do well with their Atom SoC offering, Microsoft splitting their bet between the two means they wouldn't (theoretically) suffer a loss if one platform fails or falls out of favor.

There is a kind of logic to it but it doesn't make the Windows RT latecomer any more attractive on the customer end IMO.