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WiFu

join:2010-01-07

Comcast CS cannot configure SB6141 to bridge mode?

I have my own SB6141, which I bought from the recommended list of modems for my comcast internet. It was installed by them and has been working well enough for a few months. I finally got around to trying to configure it, because it is acting as a DHCP server, but I have my own router/firewall/vpn device that I want to use. I come to find out that there is nothing configurable from the modem's management webpage.

I want to set it to bridge mode. Is that setting being locked by comcast's remote configuration of my modem?

Has anyone been successful getting them to change this? I called customer service, but their tactic was to ask me what I want to do with bridge mode. Then they say, no you can't do that, because you have a dynamic IP address, not static. I know the service gives me single dynamic address, that's all I am trying to get. Right now, I have no public IP address I can use!

This change wouldn't affect them at all. They can let me worry about the limitations of VPN and webserver with a dynamic address, but I can't tell if they're clueless, or if they are just refusing to help. "Call the manufacturer" sounds more like the later.

Any suggestions would be welcome. It does look like I can factory reset the modem if it comes to that, but then I might have real problems, whereas right now my only problem is their customer service.

Thanks.


ExoticFish

join:2008-08-31
Stuarts Draft, VA

1 edit

1 recommendation

That is not a gateway, it's a modem. There is no way for anyone to change how it is configured to work.
--
»www.VAJeeps.com | »www.APetForum.com



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to WiFu

said by WiFu:

I have my own SB6141, which I bought from the recommended list of modems for my comcast internet. It was installed by them and has been working well enough for a few months. I finally got around to trying to configure it, because it is acting as a DHCP server, but I have my own router/firewall/vpn device that I want to use. I come to find out that there is nothing configurable from the modem's management webpage.

I want to set it to bridge mode. Is that setting being locked by comcast's remote configuration of my modem?

Has anyone been successful getting them to change this? I called customer service, but their tactic was to ask me what I want to do with bridge mode. Then they say, no you can't do that, because you have a dynamic IP address, not static. I know the service gives me single dynamic address, that's all I am trying to get. Right now, I have no public IP address I can use!

This change wouldn't affect them at all. They can let me worry about the limitations of VPN and webserver with a dynamic address, but I can't tell if they're clueless, or if they are just refusing to help. "Call the manufacturer" sounds more like the later.

Any suggestions would be welcome. It does look like I can factory reset the modem if it comes to that, but then I might have real problems, whereas right now my only problem is their customer service.

Thanks.

Uhh, the SB6141 is a standard (AKA bridge) modem; that is the only mode of operation that it has. The DHCP server in the SB6141 only operates when the modem is not connected to the Comcast network; it does not have any effect on normal operation using the SB6141 as a media converter/bridge device. Also, with a typical single public IP address residential account, you should only have one device connected directly to the SB6141; that device would be your router's WAN interface, so that no other devices on your network would even be able to see the DHCP server on the SB6141.

Exactly what kind of problem (if any) are you having that you think that putting your SB6141 into "bridge" mode will fix?

FWIW, my SB6121 also has a built-in DHCP server, but even though I have a business class account, and have multiple devices attached to the SB6121, its internal DHCP server in no way interferes with any device I have behind it getting its proper public IP address (nor does it in any way interfere with the public visibility of any services I offer from behind it).




For further clarification, show below are the setup and status screens from each of the three routers that I currently have connected behind my SB6121. As you can see, each of the routers connect to the Comcast network with no interference from the built-in DHCP server in the SB6121.


Netgear WNR1000 WAN setup



Netgear WNR1000 Status



D-Link DIR655 WAN setup



D-Link DIR655 Status



D-Link EBR2310 WAN setup



D-Link EBR2310 Status


I suspect that your problem is just that you don't understand that you absolutely must use Cocmast's DHCP server to assign the public IP address(es) to any equipment that is connected to their network. Hopefully the setup screens shown above will illustrate to you that this is not a problem, it is just the way that things work in the real world.

--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


THZNDUP
Deorum Offensa Diis Curae
Premium
join:2003-09-18
Lard
kudos:2
reply to ExoticFish

Wouldn't it be a 'better' way of saying that straight plain old cable modems are bridges?

The 6141 has no bridge mode for Comcast(or anyone) to select because it's already functioning as a bridge, the only thing it can do. Well, other than being a doorstop if it's not working...........


--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything



plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to WiFu

As others have said, the SB6141 is just a "modem". Its not a gateway device with a built-in Router.

If you look at the above picture, it shows the back of the modem. You have 3 places to connect something. The top item is the Ethernet port (RJ45), that you can plug a computer into, or your own router.

Next, you have your coax connection, which would be the coax line that runs from your wall to the modem.

Finally, you have your 12VDC Power connection.

If it was a gateway device, with a built-in router, you would have 4 more RJ45 plugs on the back.

So, whatever device in your network that is acting as a DHCP server is not your modem. What other devices do you have connected?

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail

WiFu

join:2010-01-07
reply to WiFu

The config page of the modem says that it is running a DHCP server. If I haven't misread it, I can post a screen shot. It is possible that one of my wireless access points could be giving out the addresses, so I will disconnect everything to confirm.

The reason to use bridge mode, rather than NAT mode, is that if my computer has a private 192.168.1.x address, I won't be able to access that remotely. I want to put my one public IP address on my router, which would allow me VPN access to the private LAN and I could route port 80 to a webserver. I would just have to deal with the dynamic IP address changing from time to time.

Thanks for the feedback. I'll post an update tonight.


biomesh
Premium
join:2006-07-08
Tomball, TX

1 recommendation

The DHCP server that is used by the modem is only used when the device is just rebooted or is not provisioned. Once the config is on the modem, the dhcp server is not used.



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to WiFu

said by WiFu:

The config page of the modem says that it is running a DHCP server. If I haven't misread it, I can post a screen shot. It is possible that one of my wireless access points could be giving out the addresses, so I will disconnect everything to confirm.

The reason to use bridge mode, rather than NAT mode, is that if my computer has a private 192.168.1.x address, I won't be able to access that remotely. I want to put my one public IP address on my router, which would allow me VPN access to the private LAN and I could route port 80 to a webserver. I would just have to deal with the dynamic IP address changing from time to time.

Thanks for the feedback. I'll post an update tonight.

Once again, the SB6141 is a "bridge" modem, it is not a router (with or without NAT). If your PC(s) have 192.168.1.x IP addresses, then you already have a NAT router on your network, and your PC(s) are behind it.

As for not being able to access your PC with a private 192.168.1.x IP address from the Internet, that is what a good NAT router will take care of using "Virtual Server" or "Port Forwarding".

And you do not need to "deal with" monitoring your public IP address for changes, since a DDNS service (such as DynDNS) can do that automatically (even from within your router, if your router supports it).

Shown below are examples from my EBR2310 router showing exactly what I am talking about:


D-Link EBR2310 Virtual Servers



D-Link EBR2310 DDNS


And FWIW, I suspect that your SB6141 tells you exactly the same thing that my SB6121 tells me about its DHCP server:
quote:
DHCP Server Enabled
The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP Addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside of this range.

Please note the sentence that I marked with bold text. When the cable modem is connected to Comcast's network, Comcast's DHCP server takes over and assigns public IP address(es) to any connected device that it finds (and for a standard residential HSI account, that will be limited to a single device with a single public IP address).
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10

2 recommendations

reply to biomesh

said by biomesh:

The DHCP server that is used by the modem is only used when the device is just rebooted or is not provisioned. Once the config is on the modem, the dhcp server is not used.

To my experience, the built in DHCP server becomes active only when the modem is not in block synch mode (no connection to the ISP). This is so even after the modem is provisioned and has an active config file..

biomesh
Premium
join:2006-07-08
Tomball, TX

You can get this is you reset all to defaults then reboot the modem. It is not a normal occurrence and only lasts for about a minute until the modem is fully connected.


WiFu

join:2010-01-07
reply to WiFu

"DHCP Server - enabled
The Surfboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside this range."

DHCP, only when not connected? What a bizarre and undesirable feature, but hopefully true.

EDIT: I suppose it's to make it easier to access the management page.



EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to biomesh

said by biomesh:

You can get this is you reset all to defaults then reboot the modem. It is not a normal occurrence and only lasts for about a minute until the modem is fully connected.

Ah.


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to WiFu

said by WiFu:

DHCP, only when not connected? What a bizarre and undesirable feature, but hopefully true.

Agreed. I've always found it to be basically useless.


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 edit
reply to WiFu

said by WiFu:

"DHCP Server - enabled
The Surfboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside this range."

DHCP, only when not connected? What a bizarre and undesirable feature, but hopefully true.

EDIT: I suppose it's to make it easier to access the management page.

A "bizarre and undesirable feature" feature or not, if you also pay attention to the (unchangeable) IP address range involved (92.168.100.11 - 192.168.100.42), you can see that it would have nothing to do with your PC(s) receiving IP address(es) in the 192.168.1.x subnet. You need to look elsewhere on your network for the source of that DHCP delivered IP address block.

If your PC(s) run Windows, a good way to find out is to open a command prompt window and issue the "ipconfig /all" command. Here is an example I just made by doing that on one of my Windows workstations:

C:\>ipconfig /all
 
Windows IP Configuration
 
        Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : rws-wks
        Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
        Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcast
        IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
        WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
        DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : dcs-net
 
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : dcs-net
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek RTL8169/8110 Family Gigabit Ethernet NIC
        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : E0-91-F5-95-B6-9D
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
        Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.9.100
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:5:c80:62:e589:89b0:4c5c:1caf
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:5:c80:62:e291:f5ff:fe95:b69d
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::e291:f5ff:fe95:b69d%4
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.9.254
                                            fe80::1e7e:e5ff:fe4c:e6ff%4
        DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.9.254
        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.9.2
                                            75.75.75.75
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
        Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, March 07, 2013 18:10:09
        Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, March 14, 2013 18:10:09
 
Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
        NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
 
Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : dcs-net
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C0-A8-09-64
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:192.168.9.100%2
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
        NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
 
 
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:10
reply to WiFu

said by WiFu:

EDIT: I suppose it's to make it easier to access the management page.

Not necessarily. Some makes and models of modems need to be in synch mode with the provider's system in order to be able to access the built in web server / user interface page/s.

WiFu

join:2010-01-07
reply to NetFixer

said by NetFixer:

A "bizarre and undesirable feature" feature or not, if you also pay attention to the (unchangeable) IP address range involved (92.168.100.11 - 192.168.100.42), you can see that it would have nothing to do with your PC(s) receiving IP address(es) in the 192.168.1.x subnet. You need to look elsewhere on your network for the source of that DHCP delivered IP address block.

I'm agreeing with you. I honestly don't remember if it was 192.168.1.x or 192.168.100.x, but it should be the former, based on your understanding of the modem. I do have multiple devices capable of of this, but my firewall appliance is not plugged in and the Apple stuff usually gives 10.0.0.x. Anyway, it will be an easy troubleshoot if it's not the modem. Thanks.


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by WiFu:

said by NetFixer:

A "bizarre and undesirable feature" feature or not, if you also pay attention to the (unchangeable) IP address range involved (92.168.100.11 - 192.168.100.42), you can see that it would have nothing to do with your PC(s) receiving IP address(es) in the 192.168.1.x subnet. You need to look elsewhere on your network for the source of that DHCP delivered IP address block.

I'm agreeing with you. I honestly don't remember if it was 192.168.1.x or 192.168.100.x, but it should be the former, based on your understanding of the modem. I do have multiple devices capable of of this, but my firewall appliance is not plugged in and the Apple stuff usually gives 10.0.0.x. Anyway, it will be an easy troubleshoot if it's not the modem. Thanks.

If you are saying that you currently have multiple devices connected to your SB6141 instead of being behind a NAT router, that could certainly explain your confusion and your perceived problem. The "first" device that the Comcast DHCP server sees will get a public IP address assigned (for a standard single IP address dynamic IP residential account), but any other devices that are connected to the SB6141 would likely retain the 192.168.100.xx IP address that they received from the SB6141 before it was able to establish a connection to the Comcast network. This is further complicated by the cable modem itself remembering the MAC addresses of attached devices (and limiting the number to what is allowed by your account), so that newly attached devices will not actually be seen by Comcast. You are only permitted to have one device at a time connected to the Comcast network with a standard dynamic IP address residential account. Putting all of your LAN devices behind a NAT router satisfies that requirement because only the NAT router's WAN interface will be visible to the cable modem and to Comcast.

The rules for IPv6 are a bit different, but you will still need to have an IPv6 gateway router (even if it doesn't use NAT) in order to get multiple IPv6 addresses to multiple devices; simply connecting multiple IPv6 capable PC type devices to a standard cable modem on a residential HSI account will not result in all of those PC type devices receiving a public IPv6 address.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

WiFu

join:2010-01-07
reply to WiFu

Yes. I was fooled by the "DHCP Enabled" message. It means enabled, but not active. The AirPort Base Station connected to the modem was NATing and serving the IP addresses. If I connect directly, I get 76.102.x.x

In short... nevermind. Thanks for debunking my assumption.


dealhunter
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Fremont, CA
reply to NetFixer

I am having problems with having a Linksys E2000 router to get an IP address from a white SB6141 modem (bought from Newegg). It sounds like some kind of DHCP related problem with the cable modem. If I connect a laptop directly to SB6141 then internet works but not with Linksys E2000.

Am I supposed to make any changes to the SB6141 configuration to get it to work? Any pointers will be appreciated.

thanks


mrschultz02

join:2007-09-10
Media, PA

said by dealhunter:

I am having problems with having a Linksys E2000 router to get an IP address from a white SB6141 modem (bought from Newegg). It sounds like some kind of DHCP related problem with the cable modem. If I connect a laptop directly to SB6141 then internet works but not with Linksys E2000.

Am I supposed to make any changes to the SB6141 configuration to get it to work? Any pointers will be appreciated.

Power cycle the modem when ever you plug a different device into it. It grabs the MAC address of what ever is plugged in when it powers up (or the first device plugged in after power up) and remembers it until the next power cycle.

dealhunter
Premium
join:2005-03-29
Fremont, CA

I tried all possible combinations of power cycling / rebooting both cable modem and router but nothing worked. Linksys router could not get an IP address from SB6141 but my laptop could.

This thread has some discussion about DHCP related issues, and I wonder if I need to change any configuration of the modem to get this to work.

thanks again.



aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:7
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL
reply to plencnerb

While I agree their modem can not handle the public IP, all it takes is one example to prove the text that I am quoting wrong.

said by plencnerb:

If it was a gateway device, with a built-in router, you would have 4 more RJ45 plugs on the back.

Oh really..

I point to »Verizon Online DSL FAQ »What equipment does verizon use for routers and modems and quote

quote:
Other than the the Westell 6110 which is a pure bridge modem, all other modems that are issued now are routing modems (they have a router built in). These include the Westell 2200,(almost obsolete now) 6100, 6100F, 327W and 7500 and the Actiontec 701c and 704wg. he

The Westell 2200, 6100, 6100F and Actiontec 701c have only one ethernet port.

^^^
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3

2 recommendations

Well, I never said I was perfect, and knew everything!

I did not think there was such a device that is a router, with only one RJ45 port on it. The picture above is of the Wirespeed Router, Model 2200. Like you needed the picture, as you knew one did exist. I just had to look it up as I did not believe someone would make a router with only one port.

That brings up the question. What good is a router with only one port on it? If you have this, and want to connect more then one wired computer to it, you would have to buy yourself a switch.

Again, just did not know such an item existed. Thanks for pointing it out.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

3 edits

1 recommendation

said by plencnerb:

That brings up the question. What good is a router with only one port on it? If you have this, and want to connect more then one wired computer to it, you would have to buy yourself a switch.

Actually a router with one (or perhaps 2) built-in Ethernet ports is more the norm in the enterprise IT world than a router with a built-in switch (and a switch is what the extra ports are on a typical residential/soho router). The router does just that, it routes (and perhaps acts as a firewall). The job of connecting to multiple devices on the LAN is handled by one or more switches (which may be standalone boxes or plug-in modules for the router).

Shown below is a photo of the business end of a Cisco router. It comes standard with two Ethernet ports, two RS-232 serial interface ports and a GBIC interface (usually used with a fiber optic module, but it can also take a wired gigabit Ethernet module...either way, the GBIC module itself it a separately purchased item). Anything else (including additional Ethernet ports) must be purchased separately either as plug-in modules (which go into the space where the removable panels are located) or as standalone devices.




Just out of curiosity, how many LAN Ethernet ports does your pfsense router have?

--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to plencnerb

said by plencnerb:

What good is a router with only one port on it? If you have this, and want to connect more then one wired computer to it, you would have to buy yourself a switch.

What happens if you buy the typical four LAN port router but need to connect more than four computers? Sounds like a you still need a switch.


NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 recommendation

said by graysonf:

said by plencnerb:

What good is a router with only one port on it? If you have this, and want to connect more then one wired computer to it, you would have to buy yourself a switch.

What happens if you buy the typical four LAN port router but need to connect more than four computers? Sounds like a you still need a switch.

Yep, and if you have multiple LAN segments, perhaps more than one switch.



--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to graysonf

Correct. While my PFSense box does have just one NIC for my LAN, and then I have a switch, I was more specifically talking about routers that you would buy for home use. For example, a Linksys Router, Netgear Router, etc. All of those that I have seen that can be purchased at Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Fry's, TigerDirect, etc all come with 4 ports on them, as they are a router, plus a built-in 3 port switch.

Yes, a router really only needs one port, and then you add more. I just never saw a residential router that you would get for home use that only had one port on it.

I never said they did not exist, as they clearly do!

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

1 recommendation

My Efficient SpeadStream 5660 ADSL router that I no longer use had only one ethernet port. Their 5600, widely used and issued by many telecos for ADSL service has only one port as well.



NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

said by graysonf:

My Efficient SpeadStream 5660 ADSL router that I no longer use had only one ethernet port. Their 5600, widely used and issued by many telecos for ADSL service has only one port as well.

And let us not forget AT&T's ever popular Motorola/Netopia EasyBake 2210 DSL router that only had one Ethernet LAN port (maybe if it had more LAN ports some of the heat could escape along with the electrons).


The exhaust fan is a user added option


I have also had several AT&T and Vonage supplied VoIP routers that only had one LAN port.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


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3 edits

1 recommendation

reply to WiFu

Since this thread has been resurrected, I thought I would post something interesting that I discovered if I assumed that the OP's interpretation of the SB6141's DHCP server meant that it was a gateway router.

I setup my Netgear WNR1000v2-VC router's WAN to connect to my SB6121's LAN IP address instead of doing DHCP to get a Comcast IP address. What I discovered is that this is a good way for anyone who wants to see how much of the Internet is accessible using only IPv6. Even though I don't have IPv4 connectivity to the Internet (which was expected), I do get IPv6 connectivity to the Internet (which was a surprise).







C:\>ipconfig /all
 
Windows IP Configuration
 
        Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : RWS-6325
        Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
        Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcast
        IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
        WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
 
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-17-A4-E3-E7-CF
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
        Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.10.16
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:5:c80:1f:98f3:6498:e2f5:19c0
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2601:5:c80:1f:217:a4ff:fee3:e7cf
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::217:a4ff:fee3:e7cf%6
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.10.1
                                            fe80::a221:b7ff:fe9c:602%6
        DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.10.1
        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.10.1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
        Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Saturday, March 30, 2013 14:07:43
        Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, March 31, 2013 14:07:43
 
Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
        Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C0-A8-0A-10
        Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:192.168.10.16%2
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
        DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
                                            fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
        NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
 
C:\>netsh int ipv6 show addr
Querying active state...
 
Interface 6: Local Area Connection
 
Addr Type  DAD State  Valid Life   Pref. Life   Address
---------  ---------- ------------ ------------ -----------------------------
Temporary  Preferred   3d23h45m22s    23h38m37s 2601:5:c80:1f:98f3:6498:e2f5:19c0
Public     Preferred   3d23h45m22s  3d23h45m22s 2601:5:c80:1f:217:a4ff:fee3:e7cf
Link       Preferred      infinite     infinite fe80::217:a4ff:fee3:e7cf
 
Interface 2: Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
 
Addr Type  DAD State  Valid Life   Pref. Life   Address
---------  ---------- ------------ ------------ -----------------------------
Link       Preferred      infinite     infinite fe80::5efe:192.168.10.16
 
Interface 1: Loopback Pseudo-Interface
 
Addr Type  DAD State  Valid Life   Pref. Life   Address
---------  ---------- ------------ ------------ -----------------------------
Loopback   Preferred      infinite     infinite ::1
Link       Preferred      infinite     infinite fe80::1
 
C:\>ping www.comcast.net
 
Pinging a1526.dscg.akamai.net [2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9] with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9: time=31ms
Reply from 2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9: time=31ms
Reply from 2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9: time=29ms
Reply from 2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9: time=29ms
 
Ping statistics for 2001:559:0:61::173e:6fb9:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 29ms, Maximum = 31ms, Average = 30ms
 
C:\>ping -4 www.comcast.net
 
Pinging a1526.dscg.akamai.net [23.62.111.185] with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 23.62.111.185:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 
C:\>ping www.dslreports.com
 
Pinging www.dslreports.com [209.123.109.175] with 32 bytes of data:
 
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
 
Ping statistics for 209.123.109.175:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
 

Oh well, so much for an Internet that can't connect to dslreports.com.

I wonder if the dslreports.com IPv6 holdup is nginix or NAC? I know that the Apache version that I use is keeping most of my web sites from being accessible using IPv6, but I have been putting off upgrading because it is going to be a big PITA to change the Apache config and rewrite a bunch of CGI scripts. Plus, the Apache version that Comcast uses on their hosting service (and the hosting service itself) also doesn't seem to support IPv6.

--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.