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one20inna55
Premium
join:2008-01-05
Athens, TX
reply to one20inna55

Re: Down Again. Please help.

Thanks. Do you think I'll notice much of an improvement going from theoretical 5 Mbps to 10?



billaustin
they call me Mr. Bill
Premium,MVM
join:2001-10-13
North Las Vegas, NV
kudos:3

It all depends on the type of traffic across your connection. It usually is noticeable, especially for images and large file downloads.



one20inna55
Premium
join:2008-01-05
Athens, TX

Cool. Well, I just chatted with CenturyLink and for $10 more per month, they're upgrading me to the 10Mbps service. They told me to power-cycle the modem after 7PM eastern tomorrow. I assume there won't be an interruption in service when they actually flip the switch?



one20inna55
Premium
join:2008-01-05
Athens, TX
reply to billaustin

And one more question: The only reason I'm upgrading to the 10Mbps is because the tech said this new modem is compatible with it where my old 660 series was not.

I had him disable the wireless router function of the new modem so I could keep my current standalone router and thereby avoid having to re-setup my network. Will the fact that the wireless function of the modem having been disabled and I'm using my own wireless router conflict in any way with them upgrading my speed?

The last thing I want to hear is that, "Oh, by the way, you'll need to put your modem back into wireless router mode and eliminate your standalone router to benefit from the speed increase."



one20inna55
Premium
join:2008-01-05
Athens, TX
reply to one20inna55

Woohoo! I was checking my internet remotely from work (from my phone, actually) and I noticed it was down. I didn't expect the upgrade to be done so quickly since they told me wait until 7 pm eastern to reboot the modem. It just rained a little, so I feared it was a short at the box again. So, I came home. I encountered a technician leaving my driveway. He said he'd taken me offline for about 15 minutes as he did the upgrade, and he checked it at the house and all was good. I told him I was going to power-cycle the modem, but he said that wouldn't be necessary. I came home, and all the appropriate lights on the modem were lit. Then I ran this speed test. Looks good to me!




Forgiven

@embarqhsd.net

Well neighbor, I'm jealous! Our connection is so unreliable lately, my wife has to work like mad on the internet to get something done before we lose it again! We have had reliable service for over a year, up until about a month ago. The same technician comes out over & over and can't seem to fix it or figure it out. He has switched out the box/modem/wireless router for a new one, and has been in the box on the outside of the house. It has been suggested that CenturyLink has "oversold" the area, and that's why we keep getting disconnected or "knocked-off" the internet constantly. The problem seems worse right after we get rain or humidity, and especially during the weekend, which of course is when my wife needs it the most.
Every time I call it in, I talk to some of the nicest people I could hope to speak to. The technician that has been here several times (many many hours spent here already), is super friendly, but has tried everything he knows to do. I hate to keep calling it in, as I feel we are running in circles. We need help!



Forgiven

@embarqhsd.net

Well, it happened again yesterday evening and again last night! It started raining again here outside of Athens, TX. where we live, and sure enough...the internet goes out again.

It did come back on for awhile, and then went off again last night for awhile. Eventually, we could get back on, but it was terribly slow.

We used to have satellite internet before CenturyLink offered their service to us out here. Since this started happening to us about a month ago, we have started missing the old satellite internet system! It was alot slower, but we never had problems like we are having now.



ewth8tr
Premium
join:2005-04-03
Salt Lake City, UT
reply to DataRiker

said by DataRiker:

There is no plural "home runs" and you certainly don't have a home run from the picture.

The tech should have removed the inside bridge tap for you.

Without a true homerun 10 megs is doubtful.

said by DataRiker:

There is no plural "home runs" and you certainly don't have a home run from the picture.

The tech should have removed the inside bridge tap for you.

Without a true homerun 10 megs is doubtful.

You are misuing the terms, bridgetap is not multiple runs of IW, it's a T in the lines where the pair splits in different directions. (»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_tap)

Of course there are plural home runs, all a home run is is a direct run from the jack to the nid rather than it daisy chaining. If he only has 2 outlets in the house, it very well could be that he has 2 home runs.


DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

4 edits

Click for full size
He has two 2 IW's on the SAME BINDING POST feeding the inside of the home, which means bridge tap. Look at the picture again.

The only home run in this situation with pots is to use an ADSL2 splitter filter, which is not present.

Not trying to be contrary, but your 100% wrong. I have spent lots of time removing bridge tap for VDSL (Uverse). In fact this situation is textbook and by far the most common out in the field.


ewth8tr
Premium
join:2005-04-03
Salt Lake City, UT

Sorry, that is not bridge tap.

»DSL FAQ »Bridge Tap?
»www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/···dged-tap
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_tap
»encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.···idge+tap
»www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-bridge-tap.htm

I also spend lots of time removing bridge tap for VDSL (Centurylink). They are still both home runs, thus placing a homerun filter at the nid to filter out the others.

»www.siemon.com/us/standards/glossary.asp
Home-run Cabling: A distribution method in which individual cables are run directly from the horizontal cross-connect to each telecommunications outlet. This configuration is also known as star topology.

»computer.yourdictionary.com/home-run
An inside cable and wire star configuration in which each telephone or data jack connects directly to a common point, such as a demarcation point (demarc), wiring closet, or key service unit (KSU). The alternative is a shared loop that connects multiple jacks to one or two pairs that connect to the demarc or KSU. See also daisy chain and loop.



DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

4 edits

Your misunderstanding the difference between wiring that can potentially be used as a home run for xDSL AND pots, vs pots home run wiring. Without a splitter filter and attachment to separate binding post our potential home run wiring is just that, potential.

In order to have a true xDSL home run the modem will have to be attached to a separate binding post of a splitter/filer. ( which I stated in my previous post )

Both IW's on one biding post = inside bridge tap.

Your most certainly not a CentryLink employee as I have worked for Both CentryLink and ATT/SBC and we use the same terminology/definitions for inside bridge tap and home run wiring for xDSL. More specifically, we say "removing inside bridge tap" and "making a home run" interchangeably.

FYI, only the wiki article refers to the general case of bridge tap (namely a "T" in the line), while the other articles talk of outside plant bridge tap. The laws of physics are not negated by having a split inside the home rather than the plant side. In fact with VDSL inside bridge tap is usually more insidious as the reflection length is shorter and generated closer to the modem.



SBC GUY

@rr.com
reply to ewth8tr

said by ewth8tr:

They are still both home runs, thus placing a homerun filter at the nid to filter out the others.

We don't consider that a DSL homerun until the splitter filter is installed.

DR's explanation while a bit hair splitting is indeed correct, as the current picture shows inside bridge tap.