dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
11694
share rss forum feed

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Link Logger

Re: [poll] What will happen with Win8?

Putting the hardware first is arse-backwards from a design point of view. In my opinion, the primary issue is the nature of the symbols that I am manipulating. My job is about manipulating 'words', be those symbols in a computer program or in a coventional document.

OK, given that I need to do that, what's the best device now and in the forseeable future? I say 'the keyboard'. On-screen touch just doesn't have the bandwidth or the tactile feedback.

I concede that, for the 'selection' part of the UI, a touch-screen may be useful (once we get past the icky-fingerprints issue, which compromises the output characteristics of the display) since it gets us back to touching the thing-on-screen directly, a la light pen but without the weight, the cumbersome cord, and the need to pick something up interrupting the typing. So a keyboard-and-touch UI is not a bad concept: but that doesn't seem to be what Windows 8 delivers, which is more of a touch-and-keyboard UI.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Link Logger

said by Link Logger:

sometimes it takes a couple of iterations to build a successful OS that has worldwide usage.

They already had a reasonably good and successful foundation in Windows 7.


Will Windows 8 be improved, heck ya and I suspect it will be a service pack type release (likely more then one over time).

I'm not sure how Win8 will be improved. What they really need to improve is their desktop OS and if they have another OS out this year, they may very well skip on improving Win8. (security fixes don't count in that)

In light of the new OS this year, I'd say there is a roughly 50% chance for an SP1, but there's a less than 2% chance for SP2, and under 1% for additional SPs. The number of SPs are decreasing with each OS, and that trend is likely to continue.


Two, Microsoft will kill unsuccessful or expired products, however Windows 8 doesn't fall into that category. Windows 8 is about touch interfaces which is becoming the new 'mouse', so expecting Windows 8 to work on your old 90's style hardware is a little unrealistic. Windows 7 might likely remain the pinnacle OS of 90's style hardware, but what a pinnacle it is.

Win8 could be successful on tablets or phones (I'll give it a benefit of doubt ) but since it's also a desktop OS, that has to be counted, too, and Win8 fails miserably there, and that's not likely to change.

With the possible addition of the touch screen and cameras, desktop hardware didn't change much, aside from being faster and better.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

reply to Link Logger

said by Link Logger:

Not at all, what has changed on your computer in the last 20+ years?

Oh, now we're talking about me rather than the majority. That's easier.

- Multiple displays
- Large dispays, 30" & two 27"
- RAID array in my workstation
- multiple processors with multiple cores
- lower latency mice
- surround sound
- SSD's
... I don't think I should go on because this seems silly.

A touch screen display would do sweet-FA for me as I'm not going to lean across my desk swiping a 30" display. That's ridiculous.

For personal computers, people want bigger, faster, stronger. Touch? Uh, sure... why not, throw that in as a bonus.


SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by urbanriot:

A touch screen display would do sweet-FA for me as I'm not going to lean across my desk swiping a 30" display. That's ridiculous.

^ This


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

- Multiple displays
- Large dispays, 30" & two 27"
- RAID array in my workstation
- multiple processors with multiple cores
- lower latency mice
- surround sound
- SSD's

There are revolutionary changes and there are evolutionary changes. All you have listed, perhaps with the exception of SSDs are belong to the latter.

On the other hand, tablets, touch screens, pens, and smartphones are revolutionary.

BTW, I did have a dual monitor 286 system in the late 80's -- it had one 640x480 color monitor (driven by a Verticom M16) and one Hercules monochrome monitor.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

said by aurgathor:

There are revolutionary changes and there are evolutionary changes. All you have listed, perhaps with the exception of SSDs are belong to the latter.

On the other hand, tablets, touch screens, pens, and smartphones are revolutionary.

You're trying to combine apples with oranges.

It's one thing to say "PC's, tablets, smartphones were revolutionary" but we're specifically discussing one of those platforms and how we use it.

Your suggestion of what's revolutionary and evolutionary is purely in the eye of the beholder. Touch screens have been around for ages, as have tablet PC's, and I see a PC with a touch screen far less revolutionary than the ability for my workstation to have a RAID5 array or 12 cores. Watching a kid play a PC game with 5.1 sound made me say 'wow', while a touch screen on a home PC made me wonder how often they have to clean it. The all-in-one form factor hovers around 0 on my care meter.

However a tablet with all my favorites, documents, music, and a smoothly intuitive OS, that's a revolutionary experience. That's a game changer. Trying to push a half-assed tablet experience onto the desktop? That's a negative experience... which is evidenced by sales.

I have many tablets, I have two smart phones, I have an ultrabook, I have an HTPC and I have a workhorse PC, and every one of those devices serves its own purpose in my day to day life and I doubt you'll find a way to combine them all together in the next decade... not until you can shove the fastest PC in the same form factor as a tablet.


norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to Link Logger

said by Link Logger:

Microsoft tried touch with a traditional windows OS and apparently it didn't motivate consumers (perhaps the cost of touch screens was the limiting factor and not the OS).

To be honest they didn't do any of that properly.

1. The monitors were too expensive
2. The desktop touch preceded real tablet and smaller designed hardware that may benefit from touch designed O/S'.
3. No one really wants touch GUI with a desktop/work environment even now after tablets have market wide acceptance.
4. 2 & 3 suggest to me they have gone about it wrong twice in the R&D, so why would you suggest they do great in R&D, spend a lot, yes, but real R&D advancement, no. Not when they have messed it up twice.
5. The touch GUI O/S should stay separate from desktops, and R&D and sales of the products are still 2 different things, so they should branch the 2 separately, will Blue be any better? If they keep it up at the present rate, I'd wager 'no'.

They are trying to cut costs by putting 2 different projects into the same basket, and if they do it a third time, I can see some real big changes both at Microsoft and the market share for the O/S generally.

--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

If Microsoft were to make the changes that so many seem to want and thus make Metro optional, one would would think such a change would be trivial for them to make.

A very, very small change,...

And for the masses it would seem to be a world of difference,....

Perhaps there is some middle ground but at this point I don't think people want anything less then total compliance,...



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5
reply to aurgathor

Microsoft has a bad case of the cart before the horse disease. They thought that desktops were at the EOL and decided to shove them over the cliff all while indoctrinating consumers to their "new" (not new at all) product so they could transition and survive. By shoving something down our throats. Ask your lover if they like things shoved like that, without their consent?

Sure, we all said "so what's MS gonna do now to remain relevant?" and they knew we were asking. They thought shoving an idea down our throats would work. It didn't.

The idea that I want a greasy screen and to lift heavy arms up and in front of me, rather than happily resting on a pad sliding a mouse, well, let me put it this way: The mouse might have come AFTER the touch screen and been an IMPROVEMENT for some people, such as me.

What they do need to do is start fresh with a real new OS, learning from Unix, and FIRST and formost, remember the professionals, the software makers, the producers, and make what THEY think is revolutionary or whatever you call it.

We should have an OS on a chip.

With my TI 994A home computer games came in cartridges. OSs should come in carts. Pirates won't like that.
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

1 edit

2 recommendations

reply to Octavean

said by Octavean:

If Microsoft were to make the changes that so many seem to want and thus make Metro optional, one would would think such a change would be trivial for them to make.

A very, very small change,...

And for the masses it would seem to be a world of difference,....

Perhaps there is some middle ground but at this point I don't think people want anything less then total compliance,...

I didn't do Win 8 beta but I recall reading here and elsewhere that beta testers told Microsoft to NOT remove Start, etc (it was in the beta)and Microsoft paid no attention to their own testers. Why did they bother with a public beta if they had already made up their arrogant minds? (Sounds like the once great AV company Avira which also didn't bother to listen to their beta testers).

NO ONE likes being told they are irrelevant and obsolete. When a company tells its bread and butter customers (corporate, small business) such a thing something is terribly wrong with that company. Microsoft is already taking a beating, and a huge fine, from EU. Maybe it is time that corporate America tell Microsoft where to get off. Somebody has to shake some sense into their heads .... assuming that is even possible.

Notice the sudden absence of Microsoft TV ads for Surface and Windows 8? Even the shows like Hawaii 5'0 are not quite as enamored of Windows 8. I wonder how much Microsoft had to pay to get those shows to use Surface, etc?

The really sad thing is that it would be trivial to fix Windows 8 but I doubt they will. Their arrogance is too great, plus, they are incapable of eating a bit of crow and admitting that Stardock single handedly, with two small applications, fixed Wndows 8 ...not perfectly, but so it is ok as a desktop OS.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3

1 recommendation

Mele20 See Profile,

I totally agree with what you are saying. There are others in this thread that point out what I'm thinking as well, which is this: I'm not at all against Microsoft coming out with a version of an operating system that is fully focused on touch. In today's world, there is quite a large group of people who have Tablets, smartphones, and touchscreens in their home that would love to have an interface like Microsoft has created with Metro inside of Windows 8.

However, there is of course a 2nd group of users that do not own such devices, as their primary workhorse is a desktop. Some of these people may have multiple devices, which is not out of the question these days. But, this group of people are those that sit in an office and run Excel, Word, write code, and so on. They would be very happy having a powerful desktop, with 2 or 3 large LCD's connected to it.

I think what Microsoft should have done is what they did with Windows XP. There was XP Home, and XP Professional. XP Home was installed on every desktop that a consumer purchased. XP Professional was the default option for business customers, or the small group of home users who wanted more features.

If Windows 8 would have had a similar offering, life would have been a lot better. Windows 8 Home would be what we have today in Windows 8 (Metro, no start button, and so on). However, Windows 8 Professional would be what Windows XP Professional was for the business world (or those home users that had no need for Metro).

If Microsoft was able to do it with Windows XP, as far as which features were included with the two versions of the OS, I don't see why they could not do it with two flavors of Windows 8.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to aurgathor

Well there is clearly the equivalent of a lynch mob at Microsoft's front door over this. I personally don't agree with the lynch mob but I also know its not healthy to argue with a lynch mob,......


dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to signmeuptoo

What precisely would 'learning from Unix' do to prevent the proposal of GUI changes that no-one likes? Unix itself didn't even have a GUI (X is something that originated at MIT, Project Athena).

I take it you're not familiar with the GUI wars that go on in Linux land?

'Allow a choice', you might say. But GUI apps that 'fit in' have to be designed for operation under the GUI, and choice of GUI leads to market fragmentation and wasted effort: either 'app xyz' requires a particular GUI, or else someone has to handle making multiple variants. Microsoft suffered from that when they had two operating systems -- Windows 9x and the NT line -- and I assume they're not anxious to return.

I think MS has blundered here, possibly badly (it depends on what happens in the next release) but your comments don't seem to be anything other than knee-jerk MS-bashing.

I am a professional software maker, currently programming on Linux. My opinion of Windows is that it is a pretty solid base OS with a lot of crap piled on top; certainly I find the IO system (async, packet-driven) to be an improvement on Unix. And the intrinsic support of threading in the OS, rather than the bolted-on mess that that is pthreads. And the preemptability of syscalls, rather than the foolishness that is demonstrated by the EINT error. And the unified handle space, at least for kernel objects. And so on. I rather like Unix for its simplicity, but sometimes that makes it hard to do anything that needs to be complicated.



urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to plencnerb

said by plencnerb:

I think what Microsoft should have done is what they did with Windows XP. There was XP Home, and XP Professional. XP Home was installed on every desktop that a consumer purchased. XP Professional was the default option for business customers, or the small group of home users who wanted more features.

If Windows 8 would have had a similar offering, life would have been a lot better.

I think you came up with the right idea.

Windows 8 should have been released specifically for the residential touch or tablet market, especially since most corporations have banned Windows 8 Professional from their refresh. Even HP knows this as their new Elitebook models are still preloaded with Windows 7 Professional.

Although there's still plenty of residential users, possibly the majority, that still want the original desktop experience so they still should have offered a choice there...


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to plencnerb

I hear what you are saying but the example isn't exactly spot on. Windows XP Home, Windows XP Pro, Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows XP Tablet Edition, Windows XP 64bit all used the same user interface with Media Center Edition adding the special use Windows Media Center interface.

So all versions of Windows using the same interface isn't really something new or unexpected.

I personally have said time and time again (usually after each new release of Windows) that I thought Microsoft should allow or include every single UI option from every single past version in new releases of Windows. That way users would never really have to learn anything new. They could stick with Windows 1.0 interface if that is what they wanted but still run the latest Windows OS.

The reality is, even with small changes some people had problems adjusting.


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to plencnerb

Forcing users to accept phone-oriented OS on desktop computers was a pure marketing decision. It has nothing to do with technical ability to run one or the other GUI in OS and, as you know, both modules are included. It was done consciously and purposely. And there is only one way to see, if it was a right decision or wrong one. Watch the market...
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

said by OZO:

And there is only one way to see, if it was a right decision or wrong one. Watch the market...

No. Usability and focus group testing should've revealed that many people will have issues with new UI. I find it very hard to imagine that they didn't have test results indicating just that. But at some level they decided to go with the new UI anyhow, after assuming that users will learn it. Based on various feedbacks, they were very wrong.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

1 edit

Microsoft doesn't need focus groups to figure out that a radical UI change wouldn't likely be well received. A lot of people get ticked-off and confused from little more then small changes.

Microsft typically needs to walk a fine line between bringing something new to the table with each new OS release knowing the target group can be very inflexible when it comes to change.

If Windows 8 were a carbon copy of Windows 7 there would have been public outcry that nothing had changed. Instead the Windows 8 UI was radically different and we have public outcry that its too different,....

Damned if you do,....damned if you don't,....



Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state

Forcing the Metro interface on its users was purely a marketing decision.

I seen the writing on the wall with the Win 8 consumer preview. Microsoft is moving in the same direction as Apple. Microsoft sees the huge cash cow the Apple Store is. So Microsoft is going to put the Windows Store front and center.

This is bad, because at some point...be ith Win 9 or Win 10..the ONLY WAY you will be able to install any program on Windows will be through the Windows Store...there will be no other way....just like Apple.

there is a reason Gabe Newell founder of Valve, Activision/Blizzard, and some of the talking heads at EA spoke out about this....Microsoft wants a piece of that pie.

Steam/Valve has begun investing a ton of resources into porting Steam over to Linux, porting their own titles, and offering help and resources to help publishers port current and new games to run on steam Linux platform....expect it to grow big time in the next few years the catalog of games available.

Rumors are Blizzard/Activision and EA are probably going to follow a simlair route....their will be a HUGE exodus of PC gamers to Linux in the future if Microsoft follows this path...because these game publishers "Will not" pay MS a fee for these games.....

Trust me...if the newests COD is Linux/Console only....they will have no problem selling the game on Linux....gamers will come in droves.

Then we got corporations...do you really think they are going to put up with a platform tied to the Windows Store like that? nope..in the next two years...Corps will begin to make plans to migrate...they are not going to pay MS to put applications in the store so they can install them...just like Apple...no way...they will move on to something else.

Mark my words..if Microsoft follows Apple and locks all program/application installs to that Windows Store (Like Valve and others believe they will at some point) personal computing and open systems is over.....it simply can't be allowed to happen....

I personally hope the next version of Windows is a dude...I hope MS loses 10X the amount of money they lost on Vista....maybe that's what it will take to wake up them up from sinking the ship.

This whole decision about Metro and UI is not about keeping up with trends...its about Microsoft's envy and wanting a closed Apple store just like Apple has.....I want no part of that.



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

1 edit

Your example is off the mark because even Apple doesn't lock down their computers to only allow applications from their store,...yet Apple is cited for doing this,....

If Microsoft were to lock down the OS to only allow Microsoft store applications then they would be the first to do this on typical computers,....in this way,......

Many companies have likely tried this before though,...selling the PC at a loss,...trying to lock the user in. However, these companies often had problems because the computer that they tried to lock down was hacked to work like an open platform computer,....

The original Xbox was basically just a PC,.....PIII if I recall correctly,.....

***edit***

Steam/Valve has a vested interest in the direction of the platforms they support. They don't want to put all their eggs in one questionable basket,....I get it. But they have an agenda that means they themselves are not impartial here.

I'm not following them to Linux. If I go to Linux I'll do so on my own for my own reasons,....adding it to the OSes that I use along with Windows 7, Windows 8, OS X, iOS, Android, and WebOS,.....

Games don't rule my world or make my OS choices for me,.....



digitalfutur
Sees More Than Shown
Premium
join:2000-07-15
BurlingtonON
kudos:2
reply to aurgathor

Some info on Windows Blue.

quote:
The ability to more easily mess with Windows 8's settings without having to jump through all sorts of hoops and menu options seems to be a common theme within Windows Blue. For Microsoft's also apparently adding in a few extra settings within the Start Screen-based "PC settings" section – presumabyl to keep users, especially those on tablets, from having to jump into a Desktop Mode-driven settings panel.

...Users will now be able to divide their screens in half and run two apps at a time that take up equal portions of one's display real estate.
»www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2416987,00.asp
--
Logic requires one to deal with decisions that one's ego will not permit.
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing - Edmund Burke.


JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to aurgathor

based on the leaks... no start menu return.
--
My place : »www.schettino.us



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

That is certainly a possibility, though looking at the results at »[poll] Which windows 8 start menu replacement do you use? , it's probably not the one that would make the majority of users happy.

However, it would most certainly be a boon for the add-on makers' business.
--
Wacky Races 2012!



Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

Oh, now we're talking about me rather than the majority. That's easier.

- Multiple displays
- Large dispays, 30" & two 27"
- RAID array in my workstation
- multiple processors with multiple cores
- lower latency mice
- surround sound
- SSD's
... I don't think I should go on because this seems silly.

A touch screen display would do sweet-FA for me as I'm not going to lean across my desk swiping a 30" display. That's ridiculous.

For personal computers, people want bigger, faster, stronger. Touch? Uh, sure... why not, throw that in as a bonus.

Bigger and Faster, none of those changed how you interfaced with your computer. We have spent the last xeon of time sitting in a chair with a keyboard and mouse, but people have always wanted something more, computing to go if you may which requires a different interface, hence Windows 8. We might actually get to the holy grail of computing, speech interface within 10 years, but when you look at the brain activity scanning devices I have in my office, maybe in 50 years and you and your computer will be using a thought interface, you think porn is popular now, just wait.

Like I say Windows 7 might be pinnacle of sitting down, keyboard and mouse computing and that isn't so bad as Windows 7 is a hell of an OS, so perhaps the solution to the problems everyone is having is to offer Windows 7 on desktops and make Windows 8 the OS for all those other devices, but that does leave the question of how do I develop apps for Windows 8 as development requires a desktop system.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool

BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3

Their integration of two gui was just horrible, I mean seriously only being able to make new user accounts from the metro control panel, then having to go to the desktop control panel to make new users an admin? They really had their head good, and lodged up their butt.
--
I distrust those people who know so well what god wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires- Susan B. Anthony
Yesterday we obeyed kings, and bent our necks before emperors. But today we kneel only to the truth- Kahlil G.



Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to signmeuptoo

said by signmeuptoo:

"so what's MS gonna do now to remain relevant?"

Interesting, a company that people claim uses its monopoly over computing unfairly being called irrelevant.

said by signmeuptoo:

start fresh with a real new OS, learning from Unix

'Fresh' and 'new' aren't two words I think of when considering Unix, given its 43 years old.

said by signmeuptoo:

and FIRST and formost, remember the professionals, the software makers, the producers, and make what THEY think is revolutionary or whatever you call it.

This difficult as 'developers' make up such a small fraction of a percentage of computer users and their needs are so unique its actually counter to what the every day user needs or wants. I think Developers have become their own worst enemies because of the insane processes, methodologies, tool etc they have created for no other reason then creation sake. There isn't any proof that any of these things has actually improved the development process or user experience, in many ways I think developers have lost focus and are now floundering.

said by signmeuptoo:

We should have an OS on a chip.

Apple does and it didn't make anything better.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to BlitzenZeus

said by BlitzenZeus:

Their integration of two gui was just horrible, I mean seriously only being able to make new user accounts from the metro control panel, then having to go to the desktop control panel to make new users an admin? They really had their head good, and lodged up their butt.

I'm going to give them the benefit of the doubt at the moment given its rev 1 and this bridging of two different methods is pretty dam tough, so I'm very interested in rev 2 as that will indicate the direction and speed of progress.

That said I'm still running Windows 8 everywhere, but I have to test the software I develop against everything from Windows XP on up, love virtual machines and old hardware for that testing.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


plencnerb
Premium
join:2000-09-25
Carpentersville, IL
kudos:3
reply to BlitzenZeus

said by BlitzenZeus:

Their integration of two gui was just horrible, I mean seriously only being able to make new user accounts from the metro control panel, then having to go to the desktop control panel to make new users an admin? They really had their head good, and lodged up their butt.

I don't see what you are getting at here. If you open the standard control panel, and then go to "System and Security", then "Administrative tools", and then finally "Computer Management", you get the same screen that was present in Windows 7. From there, you can add new users, new groups, etc, and even place your new user in the local administrative group.

I just did that the other day when I was testing something. There was a thread about Windows 8 and the task manager showing a UAC prompt. So, to test it on my system, I created a new test user. I did not need to add them to the local admin group, but if I wanted to, the functionally is still there.

--Brian
--
============================
--Brian Plencner

E-Mail: CoasterBrian72Cancer@gmail.com
Note: Kill Cancer to Reply via e-mail

Kerodo

join:2004-05-08
reply to Link Logger

said by Link Logger:

said by BlitzenZeus:

Their integration of two gui was just horrible, I mean seriously only being able to make new user accounts from the metro control panel, then having to go to the desktop control panel to make new users an admin? They really had their head good, and lodged up their butt.

I'm going to give them the benefit of the doubt at the moment given its rev 1 and this bridging of two different methods is pretty dam tough,

That's where they went wrong to begin with, attempting to do that at all...

BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3
reply to plencnerb

You must be dense, the users snapin has never been included in the home versions.