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Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to BlitzenZeus

Re: [poll] What will happen with Win8?

No, if I decide to reinstate UAC and use some Metro Apps I would have to also have ModernMix (its existence is the only reason I would consider using Metro apps). Thus, full screen apps are no longer full screen whether on one or two monitors.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3

Which again had nothing to do with the comment, and modernmix is a 3rd party fix which shouldn't have been necessary. Modernmix is also not free.



Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

You refer to 'people' when you should be using 'I'. You're applying your needs and desires onto everyone else and you're factually wrong as evidenced by sales.

Hardly just me, as evidenced by the sales of tablets like the Surface and iPads and smart phones that people are using to do desktop like tasks. Desktop sales are dropping and many predict that tablet/laptop sales will surpass desktop sales this year, for example:

»www.digitimes.com/news/a20120307···&q=APPLE

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to Kerodo

said by Kerodo:

That's where they went wrong to begin with, attempting to do that at all...

Are you saying this shouldn't have done this at all, or perhaps a different way?

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


Alcohol
Premium
join:2003-05-26
Climax, MI
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to urbanriot

said by urbanriot:

said by Alcohol:

The concept of hybrid laptops is pretty amazing. Too bad no OEM has managed to do it properly.

I'm guessing you haven't used a Lenovo Yoga yet...?

I was interested it in until i read it had trackpad issues.
»www.theverge.com/2012/11/9/36154···3-review
--
I found the key to success but somebody changed the lock.


Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state
reply to Octavean

Octavean:

Im not sure you understand where I am coming from. When talking about Apple Computers and Laptops, they are running x86 hardware for the most part the same as a Desktop PC.

However the Apple Store based systems :ie the IPhone, Ipad, etc are running IOS in most cases ARM based systems.

Now Microsoft has stated ARM is the future for the Desktop. AMD is investing heavily in beginning to produce ARM chips that can be used more mainstream in desktop systems.

Windows RT is the future vision of Microsoft for the mainstream users...Windows RT, the ARM version of Windows, is a "walled garden" environment. Microsoft has no plans of changing that.

I fully believe Windows 8, and perhaps Windows 9 will be "transition OS" as Microsoft exhorts pressure on the OEM's to begin pushing ARM hardware for Windows.

Once Dell, HP, Acer, and the other OEM's are pushing ARM based desktops and laptops...the walled garden will begin. Microsoft has no intentions of opening up the ARM platform. The ARM platform, such as Windows RT will not run x86 based applications. The only way to install new programs on a RT based system is either by jailbreaking it, or through the Windows store.

In essence they are pushing for a walled garden environment.

Will Microsoft still sell a "pro version" of Windows that runs on x86 hardware? perhaps, but it won't be the mainstream offering. Prices for it will be much higher then the ARM counterpart they wish to push, and put front and center.

For the home user, only those that buy their own x86 hardware IE: System builders who build their own PC will be able to afford to have an x86 based machine.

ARM desktops could sell for as little as $250 bucks....a comparible x86 based machine would cost twice as much....whats the consumer going to buy? I know it, and MS knows it...they will buy the ARM one that is a walled garden and a cash cow for Microsoft.

Those who think a walled garden is not in the future for Windows on the desktop is not paying attention. Microsoft has already locked down the ARM RT version of Windows...it won't run any apps outside the Windows Store under most circumstances.

Microsoft gets 30% cut of all sales made through the store...this is why Microsoft is pushing Metro...they want to get the "masses" (I say tongue in cheek) assimilated to the UI that will lead to the future walled garden known as Windows.

In the future, if you don't want to be restricted to a walled garden....you will have to pay handsomely to do so....

the OEM's may not even sell x86 based systems to home users at all...as being restricted to the walledgarden known as the Windows Store will greatly reduce technical support costs and increase the OEM's bottom line.

These are all issues to think long and hard about....in the future Windows that isn't stuck to a walledgarden will be available...but you will pay a premium price on it, and outside of buying Businesses editions from the OEM(that most home/consumer buyers doesn't even know exists) building a PC by buying your own hardware will be the only real cost effective option of doing so.


Kerodo

join:2004-05-08
reply to Link Logger

said by Link Logger:

said by Kerodo:

That's where they went wrong to begin with, attempting to do that at all...

Are you saying this shouldn't have done this at all, or perhaps a different way?

Blake

A separate OS for tablets would have been wiser, leaving the traditional desktop/laptop OS as is. Touch will never go over on the traditional machines.

If not that, then query the hardware during install, and configure with Metro for touch machines, and no Metro for non-touch machines.

Something more intelligent than the mess they created with 8.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

said by Kerodo:

A separate OS for tablets would have been wiser, leaving the traditional desktop/laptop OS as is.

Apple was wise enough to know that. Google too.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Woody79_00

said by Woody79_00:

Now Microsoft has stated ARM is the future for the Desktop.

Link(s) please.

Windows RT is the future vision of Microsoft for the mainstream users...

I think users will have some say about that, too.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Kerodo

said by Kerodo:

A separate OS for tablets would have been wiser, leaving the traditional desktop/laptop OS as is.

Having an option for the traditional desktop would've been more than enough.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state
reply to aurgathor

said by aurgathor:

said by Woody79_00:

Now Microsoft has stated ARM is the future for the Desktop.

Link(s) please.

»www.cio.in/news/windows-rt-doubt···85642013


Microsoft Exec Claims 'Bright Future' for Windows RT
Added 23rd Mar 2013
Jared Newman

Consumers and PC makers might be turned off by Windows RT. Microsoft doesn't share their ambivalence.

The company is sticking with the ARM-based version of Windows for the long haul. Michael Angiulo, Microsoft's corporate vice president of Windows planning, told CNet that Windows RT is an industry "disruption" that will get stronger over time.

"If you look forward a year or two and you look at the performance output of ARM chips, those are some really capable chips," Angiulo said. "I think it has a very bright future."

Angiulo argued that Windows RT's ability to install only Windows Store apps and not legacy desktop software--a criticism many have lodged at the new OS--is actually a benefit because users can just re-download all their apps on any new machine. He also thinks ARM-based PCs will be more likely to ship with mobile broadband connectivity, due to their long battery life on connected standby, a mode that allows the device to pull in e-mails and other updates in a low-power state.


Microsoft said so at launch that ARM/Win RT is going to be their big focus....they are already refering to the desktop as "Legacy Windows". In the future the Desktop will be gone and only Metro UI will be usable at all.....a very expensive Pro version will run x86 programs, but it WILL NOT be the mainstream version of Windows, and it will be more expensive.

Read the Article...the Vice President of Windows planning is already talking about ARM based PC's....the day is coming soon.

Windows RT is the future vision of Microsoft for the mainstream users...

I think users will have some say about that, too.

Users like us on this forum are a minority...Microsoft doesn't care what we think. 9 out of 10 average joe users will have no problem buying a machine that is a walled garden locked to the Windows Store like an Ipad.

Microsoft wants what Apple has...a walled garden environment with 100% controll over not only the OS, but the 3rd party developers too...and they will get a cut on all apps distributed through their store.

They are already doing this with the Xbox...its part of a long term plan.

Look I am not going to try and convince everyone here...just wait 3-5 years from now when Windows is a walled garden...folks can look back at this post, look back at the Statements made by Gabe Newell, Activision/Blizzard, and some of the higher talking heads of EA (names escape me) they all warned us about what direction MS is taking us.

If some people think a Walled garden Windows, like IOS is great fine, but I won't buy it.

The "only hope" we have is we need to hope Intel and AMD can get their Jaguar and Atom based processor prices down low enough that they could be on par of cheaper then ARM so users will pick that version over the ARM one...thats our best hope to avert this.

BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3

Just like their vision of Zune being successful in the market?



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to Woody79_00

said by Woody79_00:

Octavean:

Im not sure you understand where I am coming from. When talking about Apple Computers and Laptops, they are running x86 hardware for the most part the same as a Desktop PC.

However the Apple Store based systems :ie the IPhone, Ipad, etc are running IOS in most cases ARM based systems.

Oh, I understood your first post quite well and what you said there is different from what you said in your follow up post. You made no mention of ARM devices in your first post. What you intended to say and what you actually said seem to have had a disconnect if that was your intended meaning,..

As for your second post, if Locked-down ARM devices is what the masses want then that is the direction the industry will surely go. The reality is that ARM devices like smart phones and tablets (iOS and Android) are selling quite well. That doesn't mean Windows RT ARM devices are selling well and unlike the former ARM devices mentioned are actually selling quite poorly. Some manufactures are passing on the option to build such Windows RT ARM devices and some that have started manufacturing them have dropped the product line.

Intel has a lot to lose by an ARM takeover as well so they will be looking to fight on the price , performance, efficiency front as well. However, with traditional computers higher-end performance has almost always cost more. That's just a fact that people have to deal with and if the market shrinks then it stands to reason that prices will go up even more.

Switching to Linux won't save people from rising PC hardware prices caused by a shrinking market,...

Anyway, feel free to wake me when the revolution "starts", but until then I remain skeptical. I'm not going to quake in my boots just yet,.....


Woody79_00
I run Linux am I still a PC?
Premium
join:2004-07-08
united state

Octavean: in my first post I meant to include ARM devices, but perhaps may have gotten lost as I was also posting a reply on another site with a similar topic. The lack of ARM devices in my first post was clearly the disconnect, which I apologize for the confusion.

As for your comments on the industry's direction, I agree with you. Even though Windows RT isn't selling well right now, it may in the future now that the Xbox and Its apps are locked into the same platform/Windows Store. the new Xbox is slated to debut before years end.

Windows RT may be a platform Microsoft is willing to take losses on in the short term and invest heavily in it, for benefits accrued later.

(See Bing search, it has made major strides in the market the last few years, it has actually become a small competitor and will continue to gain market in that area as long as MS continues to promote it. Bing is making slow progess, but it is gaining users every quarter, it may be a slow process but MS will get a decent share of the market as long as they continue the improvements and basis of their stated mission with bing.)

I agree that switching to Linux won't save us from hardware prices going up.

I also agree about AMD/Intel having a lot to lose with an ARM takeover. Its why im hoping Intel and AMD can price their Jaguar and Atom platforms around the same power, efficency, and price comparable or cheaper then the ARM chips....that will be key in keeping x86 around mainstream.

As long as x86-x64 is around and popular, the chances of being walled off is much less which is good for everyone all around including the consumer.

I also don't think its time to quake in our boots just yet, but depending on reception, and various other factors. It may be an idea Microsoft explores at some point in the future...that is something yet to be determined.

good conversation by the way Octaven Very good, well reasoned and thought out responses! I hope your monday at the office is treating you well!



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

Thanks, I enjoy our talks too

I do respect your point of view,...

I'm actually on something of a vacation right now but am getting snowed out (yesterday) and rained out (today) but I'm cool with it.

Anyway, I think Intel can and will bring the fight to ARM devices in due time. It does sort of make some sense for AMD to make ARM chips and X86 / X64 chips as well though. There are even rumors that Intel foundries are in talks for ARM manufacturing too,...

As oddball as it might be I'm interested in buying the ASUS Fonepad which is Android on Intel Atom:

ASUS FonePad official: 7-inch tablet with phone functionality, priced at $249 (hands-on) Hands-on

It seems reasonably cheap and functional. It could serve as a nice GPS for the car (I think) and an in car phone (if I forget my phone).

I don't think the history is written just yet, Intel has a chance to pull this out of the fire.

Microsoft has money to throw at their problems but with Zune they proved that they were also willing to cut their losses and run. So who knows how hard they are willing to push Windows RT. Still, Windows RT seems like or feels like (IMO) the answer to a question a lot of people never asked.

One thing is for sure though. Intel and Microsoft's WinTel alliance was in lockstep for quite some time (AMD as well). Something happened to fracture that covenant



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Woody79_00

And where exactly in that article Michael Angiulo states that "ARM is the future for the Desktop"?



ccallana
Huh?
Premium,VIP
join:2000-08-03
Folsom, CA
reply to Octavean

said by Octavean:

Anyway, I think Intel can and will bring the fight to ARM devices in due time. It does sort of make some sense for AMD to make ARM chips and X86 / X64 chips as well though. There are even rumors that Intel foundries are in talks for ARM manufacturing too,...

I don't think "in due time" is quite right - the fight has already been brought. Intel has already shown it can do high performance at same or better power consumption than ARM in Medfield and even Clovertrail Tablets. I think over time that gap will widen with Intel's manufacturing lead. (full disclosure, I work for Intel - but of course, standard disclaimers apply, I do not speak for them in any way.)

--
"We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us.... We are far too easily pleased." C.S. Lewis


Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

1 recommendation

said by ccallana:

said by Octavean:

Anyway, I think Intel can and will bring the fight to ARM devices in due time. It does sort of make some sense for AMD to make ARM chips and X86 / X64 chips as well though. There are even rumors that Intel foundries are in talks for ARM manufacturing too,...

I don't think "in due time" is quite right - the fight has already been brought. Intel has already shown it can do high performance at same or better power consumption than ARM in Medfield and even Clovertrail Tablets. I think over time that gap will widen with Intel's manufacturing lead. (full disclosure, I work for Intel - but of course, standard disclaimers apply, I do not speak for them in any way.)

To be clear, my point by saying "in due time", was simply to say that Intel Atom doesn't have the same market penetration as ARM on smartphones and tablets. Also note there are even some hybrid desktops with ARM processors as well as ARM based servers entering the market threatening what used to quasi x86 / x64 only territory.

Let's be clear, having a superior product doesn't assure anything especially so if one is trailing in mindshare,...

Victory is not assured,....

BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3

Well without knowing the full technical specs, I'd say x86/64 bit being a jack of all trades generally being a little slower than the more linear processors like gpus as they have a far bigger instruction set. I'd almost say if they could drop some legacy from the x86 instructions which would unfortunately cause problems for some software, and operating systems would allow them to be faster on the same or less power. It would just mean that this new hardware would need a new os, and newer software, however even adoption of 64-bit software on Win 64-bit has been slow with many still only releasing 32-bit software. All tablets currently to my knowledge with the exception of the surface pro are 32-bit.
--
I distrust those people who know so well what god wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires- Susan B. Anthony
Yesterday we obeyed kings, and bent our necks before emperors. But today we kneel only to the truth- Kahlil G.



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

Adding to the instruction set seems to be the way of the industry rather then detracting from it. Some special cases might call for it though, I wouldn't really know,...

My aging ASUS Eee slate EP121 Core i5 tablet PC pre-dates Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge but is still reasonably powerful. It shipped with the 64bit version of Windows 7 Home Premium and now runs Windows 8 Pro 64bit. Microsoft Surface Pro isn't really anything new. It seems to be getting undue attention due to being Microsoft branded and it seems some people didn't even know PC tablets existed until Microsoft brought attention to it with the Surface Pro.

One thing I find interesting though is Ubuntu for Smartphones and tablets. My main interest here is that apperently it can be installed on a range of ARM devices. until now, i havent really come across an OS that was intended to be installed on devices that originally shipped with dissimilar OSes.

Why should anyone care about this? Well that is the type of flexibility that helped Microsoft gain such a large market share. If a company comes along with a slick OS that can be installed over iOS, Android and Windows RT devices it could erode the market for these companies,....especially if its an easy to use relatively open platform.

Even if such an OS doesn't take over ARM devices it could force the popular ARM OSes into being a little more flexible and open. It could also force them to support their hardware longer or risk it running a competing OS,....


BlitzenZeus
Burnt Out Cynic
Premium
join:2000-01-13
kudos:3

I had heard the ms tablets were secure boot locked down to where it can't be disabled, but I cannot confirm that first hand so your older tablet might have a real advantage.

I came across people who put nix on their smartphones years ago when I worked for a cellular company, but didn't really pay attention to them. I'm sure they were already running some form of proprietary os, or nix already anyway.

Honestly after using ubuntu it's definitely useable, and an alternative, however when I was previously running ubuntu it was all over the place with it's support. While this won't apply to a tablet, the mouse movement was a slug at best, literally dragging it across my desk compared to windows, and I had to make a manual script to run a command line option to change the sensitivity of the mouse considerably from the debian documentation as the gui settings didn't go any higher. This among other issues. It will work for some, but definitely not everyone.

When it comes to the hardware, I'm sure once they bought them other than pushing out updates they don't really care what the consumers do with them, but with it being locked down will make it harder to mess with them. A person could even brick it doing it wrong, that is if an os update doesn't brick it first, and with secure boot always on the recovery options seem quite limited unless it can be flashed like most popular smartphones.
--
I distrust those people who know so well what god wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires- Susan B. Anthony
Yesterday we obeyed kings, and bent our necks before emperors. But today we kneel only to the truth- Kahlil G.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by Kramer:

I don't know what you would be willing to bet, but I have a beard I'd be willing to place on the line if Windows doesn't have some semblance of a Start Menu either in Beta or final form by the end of the third quarter.

You'd lose that bet.

So, does the leaked Blue have a Start Menu? No? Want sauce with that beard?
--
My place : »www.schettino.us


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to aurgathor

The problem with the 'walled' thing is enterprise computing will never buy into that model, internally developed and used software won't go through Microsoft's store and nor will they tolerate paying for it through the store, so there has to be another way to distribute software or enterprise computing is gonzo. While Apple's wall might keep users in, it also keeps enterprise users out.

I find it hard to believe that Intel is just going to sit back and let this go without a fight as Microsoft is a huge reason why Intel is Intel, I can't believe they aren't fighting way harder on this, but maybe we have come to the end of Win32 abilities and its time to make that next jump to WinRT.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool



kickass69

join:2002-06-03
Lake Hopatcong, NJ

I doubt that we've come to the end of Win32 when most developers won't even jump to 64-bit. It's all about money and control not lack of innovation.



Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to JohnInSJ

said by JohnInSJ:

said by JohnInSJ:

said by Kramer:

I don't know what you would be willing to bet, but I have a beard I'd be willing to place on the line if Windows doesn't have some semblance of a Start Menu either in Beta or final form by the end of the third quarter.

You'd lose that bet.

So, does the leaked Blue have a Start Menu? No? Want sauce with that beard?

Got two quarters to go. You really think MS would allow that to leak? I'm still waiting to hear what you are willing to put in the pot.


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON

Five reasons why the Windows desktop isn't going away

1. Four million desktop apps need to run somewhere. Back in 2010, at the International CES in Las Vegas, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer noted that four million desktop programs run on Windows 7. All of those programs run on Windows 8, too. Backward compatibility is the lifeblood of Windows. The idea that those legacy apps will be orphaned in a single release is ludicrous.

2. Corporate customers and OEMs would mutiny. Corporate customers need to write custom apps that run on Windows. Those apps need to do things that aren’t possible in the highly constrained Windows 8 app model. And those corporate customers with their volume licenses pay billions of dollars in license fees to Microsoft every year for Windows. Say what you want about Steve Ballmer, but don’t try to tell me he’s going to willingly give up one of Microsoft’s most lucrative revenue streams. And if you think that, well, then you probably think Richard Stallman is next in line to be Chief Technical Officer of Microsoft.

3. Refactoring old-fashioned dialog boxes into a more touch-friendly interface is an evolutionary step. The whole point of Windows 8 is to enable touch as a primary user input mechanism, alongside the mouse and keyboard. That makes it possible for Microsoft’s PC-building OEM partners to build hybrid devices that can smoothly shift from conventional PC to tablet and back again. (I looked at three such devices just a few weeks ago.) In the first release of Windows 8, a limited selection of Control Panel functions were converted to the new modern/Metro UI. Did anyone not expect that the long-term goal was to move more and more of these functions to the modern UI? Yes, that means the old desktop Control Panel is being deprecated, and that Windows users will probably need to drop to the desktop less often in Blue. It doesn’t mean the desktop is vanishing.

4. Removing the desktop would be more trouble than it’s worth. Many hundreds of thousands of words have been written about the complexity of Windows. Windows developers have spent years making the OS simpler, and more modular, with some success. But ripping out the desktop completely is, if not impossible, at least highly unlikely. Maybe in a decade the need for the desktop will vanish. But that day won’t come this year or next.

5. Microsoft already has a “no desktop” option: Windows RT. When Windows 8 shipped last October, Windows RT shipped right alongside it. Microsoft is committed to both platforms. One has the ability to run Windows desktop apps; the other doesn’t. Does anyone really believe that Microsoft would dump the OS that sold 60 million copies in its first two months and put all its chips on the one that has sold perhaps a million or two copies in the same period? If so, I want to play poker with you.


--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to kickass69

I know it gets a lot of people but Win32 isn't just 32 bit code, its the API set that was introduced with WinNT and includes what your thinking of when you say 64 bit coding. WinRT is the replacement for Win32 (or an injected layer above depending on who you talk to), so think of it a new guts for the OS that programmers interact with. One of the features with WinRT is it natively support both the x86 and ARM architectures.

As to what type of programming most coders are do, is something I'd love to find stats for as it might be interesting, but 32/64 bit code really isn't even a consideration as its a compiler flag (and maybe a couple of code tweaks). I think most programmers wish we could get to just 64 bit code, but the problem is legacy hardware that's going to be around for a long time and its ripple effect even longer.

For traditional user apps, Windows Store seems to be the direction Microsoft is wanting developers to go. I find 'Services' to be interesting as in the Win32 -> WinForms -> WPF -> Windows Store migration, its seems to have come off the tracks before it got to WPF, so I'm kind of curious as to where these types of 'backgroundie' types of application are going to end up.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool



kickass69

join:2002-06-03
Lake Hopatcong, NJ

Given that though....if WinRT becomes what Microsoft is shifting everyone to....Windows will be nothing more than a locked down OS where you can only get/upgrade programs/apps from the Microsoft Store. I'll easily go to Linux if that happens and I hope it would blowback hard in MS's face.



Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

said by kickass69:

Given that though....if WinRT becomes what Microsoft is shifting everyone to....Windows will be nothing more than a locked down OS where you can only get/upgrade programs/apps from the Microsoft Store. I'll easily go to Linux if that happens and I hope it would blowback hard in MS's face.

Linux, what is that? Last time I check »gs.statcounter.com/#os-ww-monthl···2-201302 it had less then 1% of the world's desktops and has been pretty much flat lined forever despite all the 'this will be the year of Linux'.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

2 edits

said by Link Logger:

Linux, what is that? Last time I check »gs.statcounter.com/#os-ww-monthl···2-201302 it had less then 1% of the world's desktops and has been pretty much flat lined forever despite all the 'this will be the year of Linux'.

The past is not necessarily a good predictor of the future. Yes, Linux's market share is definitely lagging, but maybe all Linux need is Windows pressing a 'self destruct' button ....

I'm not saying that Windows is at that point, but trying push on users something many don't like and don't want while hoping that said users will change is not a particularly smart move in my book, even if MS may have some noble reasons behind it. (i.e. unified interface for everything Win8 runs on)

Just to give an example, dinos ruled the Earth for millions of years, until disaster struck. And with exception of a small number of related lineages, they became fossils in a short amount of time. I know one can argue that this is apples and oranges, but still...
--
Wacky Races 2012!