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boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC

12x12 outdoor slip resistance tiles

My wife wanted a rocking chair set out front in the pine straw. Now she has decided a portion of the pine straw needs to go and I need to put in a 4' x 8' pad of 12"x12" tiles - the rest of the pine straw can remain

If I go down to Lowe's, what kind of tiles do I get to 1) support her rocking chair and 2) are not slippery when wet (morning dew and after a rain shower)? I sure don't want her slipping on wet, slick tiles.

And I may need to chip a couple of tiles to fit neatly where the sidewalk makes a right angle curve (typical curve used with a typical concrete sidewalk in a typical subdivision). She does not want a poured concrete pad.



dandelion
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-29
Germantown, TN
kudos:5

What about stone or brick? You are basically talking of a patio, right? Pictures would be nice.



pike
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-01
Washington, DC
kudos:3
reply to boaterbob

Click for full size
The first thing that came to mind for me when you said durable and slip-resistant was those "diamond plate" terra cotta tiles often seen in commercial kitchens. May not be the most visually appealing for your application though...


VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL
reply to boaterbob

When you are talking about pine straw I assume this application is out on the lawn. Are you referring to 12x12 concrete pavers or actual ceramic, porcelain tile?


boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC

Well, my wife mentioned ceramic or porcelain - are any of those 'non-slippery' by the nature of their surface texture or design?



VioletVenom
Lets go Gators
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Gainesville, FL

Not per say, what you have to look at is the coefficient of friction. For nonslip you want a COF of greater than or equal to .05. With an exterior application keep in mind the tile's frost resistance too. If you go into one of the box stores they probably won't know anything about tile's technical specifications. I'd suggest looking online at tile manufacturers' websites first. They usually have a spec sheet on each of their tiles. You can then take that info into the store and have the store order the tile.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

1 recommendation

reply to boaterbob

A ceramic or porcelain tile will break under the weight of a rocker, unless it's laying on top of a concrete pad! Your best bet would be to use pavers, they are available in a variety of shapes and sizes and colors. The surface is concrete, so it's quite slip resistant.


boaterbob
Premium
join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC

Pavers it will be!

Thanks to all



beck
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-29
On The Road
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Stablehost.com
reply to boaterbob

Remember that any shaping or ridges in the pavers, or between them, will make the rocker jerk or stop. Rockers like smooth surface. Take the rocker to some friend's house that has the surface you are going to make and try it. Bet you change your mind.