dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
2937
share rss forum feed


bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks
reply to 35245635

Re: house wrap under gables

Thanks for another insight concerning shifting earth which is another reason that slathering on caulking to exterior is a half-assed solution to this problem.



bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks

3 edits
reply to 35245635

thank you all. I have blended two separate posts albeit related so I will continue the discussion about leaking door in its original post.

The NO house wrap under gables issue seems a lot easier to fix than this basement door problem.



bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks

1 edit
reply to 35245635

said by 35245635:

I've been watching 30+ houses built across the street with the same issues. This is the reason I buy older houses and avoid new like the plague.

Just wait until the ground shifts and cracks the foundation or walls inside. Hopefully the doorways are square. I put a level on a few in the new houses across the street after I had to jam a closet door closed. Most of the doorways were close to square but off. They cut the siding too short to save money so when it gets cold the siding contracts and you can see small gaps. They don't come with gutters and all they get is a lovely contractor grade lawn. They installed the bare minimum electrical so rooms like the living room don't have enough plugs. They are selling these houses for $490,000 to $850,000 so they should be prime houses given the neighborhood median price is about $400,000.

What you describe here is depressing especially for homes in that dollar range which mine obviously is not. Yet, (and maybe I'm naive here) whether you're having a $500,000 home built OR a $100,000 dollar home built, there should be some basic, good construction ethic that does whatever necessary according to a higher standard in order to protect doors, windows, siding, roof, concrete walls FROM WATER INTRUSION. I'm not asking for an indoor swimming pool. All I'm asking is that my basement walls do not exhibit wet spots in less than 6 months of ownership of the new home and that my walkout basement door does not leak since the very first rainfall.


35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA

said by bcool:

said by 35245635:

I've been watching 30+ houses built across the street with the same issues. This is the reason I buy older houses and avoid new like the plague.

Just wait until the ground shifts and cracks the foundation or walls inside. Hopefully the doorways are square. I put a level on a few in the new houses across the street after I had to jam a closet door closed. Most of the doorways were close to square but off. They cut the siding too short to save money so when it gets cold the siding contracts and you can see small gaps. They don't come with gutters and all they get is a lovely contractor grade lawn. They installed the bare minimum electrical so rooms like the living room don't have enough plugs. They are selling these houses for $490,000 to $850,000 so they should be prime houses given the neighborhood median price is about $400,000.

What you describe here is depressing especially for homes in that dollar range which mine obviously is not. Yet, (and maybe I'm naive here) whether you're having a $500,000 home built OR a $100,000 dollar home built, there should be some basic, good construction ethic that does whatever necessary according to a higher standard in order to protect doors, windows, siding, roof, concrete walls FROM WATER INTRUSION. I'm not asking for an indoor swimming pool. All I'm asking is that my basement walls do not exhibit wet spots in less than 6 months of ownership of the new home and that my walkout basement door does not leak since the very first rainfall.

It's very depressing. The quality just isn't what it use to be. Hopefully you'll have better luck. I just wanted you to be aware of some of the new house issues so you can notice them early and get them fixed should they happen.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to bcool

Why would there be a need for house wrap above the attic joists? Is that an insulated space? Maybe I missed that when I read through the thread. If not, you maybe should be looking for more attic vents rather than house wrap up there.

On the other hand, if you insulation is in the roof rafters making the attic space insulated, then I understand why house wrap would be appropriate.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to 35245635

said by 35245635:

I've been watching 30+ houses built across the street with the same issues. This is the reason I buy older houses and avoid new like the plague.

My house is 34 years old and build by one of the areas largest home developers. They aren't cookie cutter homes, but they aren't custom homes either. I've owned the home for about 12 years now and have done more than enough home improvements inside and out to officially know that a lot of corners were cut where to do things right would have been negligibly more expensive.

If you prefer a older house, I helped a friend reside a 1920's balloon framed home. The sheathing consisted of 1x4 and 1x6 with between 1/4 and 1/2 gaps between boards. Original insulation was none. It was typical for a house of it's time here. Is that the better quality you're referring to?


CFoo

join:2008-03-19
Nepean, ON
reply to bcool

said by bcool:

I don't know how you build like this and sleep at night.

They sleep well because of their money filled mattreses.


CFoo

join:2008-03-19
Nepean, ON
reply to 35245635

Its the same in my neighborhood. Because of the low interest rates in Canada, the housing economy has been in a boom. One builder told me directly that there are not enough labourers around of all of the new houses going up. 4 bedroom homes are going for $500,000 and up and that's typically for a 40-50ft wide lot. I have inpsected a few homes and I found so many issues that it was scary.



35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA
reply to cdru

said by cdru:

said by 35245635:

I've been watching 30+ houses built across the street with the same issues. This is the reason I buy older houses and avoid new like the plague.

My house is 34 years old and build by one of the areas largest home developers. They aren't cookie cutter homes, but they aren't custom homes either. I've owned the home for about 12 years now and have done more than enough home improvements inside and out to officially know that a lot of corners were cut where to do things right would have been negligibly more expensive.

If you prefer a older house, I helped a friend reside a 1920's balloon framed home. The sheathing consisted of 1x4 and 1x6 with between 1/4 and 1/2 gaps between boards. Original insulation was none. It was typical for a house of it's time here. Is that the better quality you're referring to?

WAY better construction back in 1920. It's much cheaper to add insulation then fix problems that can't really be fixed as easy like mentioned. Nothing is perfect but the goal is to pick the path of least resistance.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill


gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA

1 edit
reply to bcool

Its like a big scoop for water to get into the building.
Eventually the water will get right through the tyvek tape applied to the top of the wrap and the wrap will grab the water going down the wall. The glue on the tape wont stick after its wet, especially to wood(expansion/contraction), as its designed to stick to tyvek.
It should not have passed inspection, who knows why, could be a lot of reasons to speculate.

Did he specifically say they didn't put wrap on the gables? Cause they could have put it on when they setup to side the gable.

You can test for leaks with a hose. If its not fixed in a reasonable time you can hire another contractor to do the repairs and sue the builder and his subs. It will be a long, drawn out, expensive process.
It's likely he has been sued before and knows the ropes and has a good lawyer. A big pita most people wont have resources for.
--
Let them eat FIBER!


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to StillLearn

said by StillLearn:

Why would there be a need for house wrap above the attic joists? Is that an insulated space? Maybe I missed that when I read through the thread. If not, you maybe should be looking for more attic vents rather than house wrap up there.

On the other hand, if you insulation is in the roof rafters making the attic space insulated, then I understand why house wrap would be appropriate.

The house wrap in that area is to help keep water that will intrude below the vinyl siding from rotting the sheathing and generally making its way into the house.