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Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to d4m1r

Re: PoE vs Bridge vs ??

It's rather telling, though, that you're only syncing at 27% of the rated speed, and that still isn't going to be the real-world throughput.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4

They're used in a commercial building with hundreds of watts of old-style fluorescent ballasts running during the day. Once the lights are off the sync rate increases considerably.

Either way, it gets the job done. It's still able to drive the 802.11n AP at full speed.



d4m1r

join:2011-08-25
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to d4m1r

1) Just tested it at 6:30pm on a weekday afternoon. I am getting 24-28MBps when my laptop is directly connected to the router.

2) Through powerline (downstairs and other side of the house) I am getting 19-24MBps on my laptop. This should be enough to stream 1080p content.

I am surprised it is working that well actually and I suspect I could pull my full 28MBps if I tested off peak...The latency is slightly higher though powerline though (+2ms). Anyway, it seems the fact I only got the 200MBps kit and its not gigabit (only 10/100) doesn't matter as it can pull close to my full speed anyway. The fact that its a relatively new standalone house might have sometime to do with that.

I will have to retest when 45/4 kicks in this weekend actually because I incorrectly thought it already had. Will be interesting to see how much of the full 45MBps I can pull with this setup...
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www.613websites.com Budget Canadian Web Design and Hosting



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to d4m1r

If it's already bottlenecked to 19-24, you'll probably get that same speed when your connection is upgraded. But as you pointed out, it's more than sufficient for streaming 1080p. You may have issues if you're trying network streaming from a media server or something; I've got bluray rips that are higher bitrate than 19-24, for example. But definitely anything off the internet, those speeds will be fine, and even most things over the network should be OK too. A 15GB movie that is 2 hours long is going to need only roughly 17 Mbps, so you've got enough overhead for even that, if you're a fan of HDBits or some similar videophile site :P
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



d4m1r

join:2011-08-25
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
reply to d4m1r

Luckily I am not haha, and can't be really with these punny Canadian caps

All this stuff is still very annoying...I wished they paired the numbers to real home internet speeds, ie: "rated for up to 45MBps" instead of saying "200MBps!!!!"....Either way, thanks for the replies guys and I'll post back up what happens with a 45MBps connection with a 200MBps kit.
--
www.613websites.com Budget Canadian Web Design and Hosting



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to d4m1r

It's like how 802.11g devices are marketed as 54 Mbps (which is their actual PHY rate) but only produce about 20Mbps under ideal circumstances in the real world.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org



TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to d4m1r

It most likely gets 200Mbps full duplex under perfect conditions. But home electrical wiring was never laid out for carrying data signals so real world you will never see it.

Maybe contractors will start designing the lay out of new homes' electrical wiring to offer the best scenario for data as well but they can also (and are) just lay out ethernet throughout the house and leave the ends unterminated at the distribution cabinet in the basement (dunno if they'd include the patch panel but maybe they do as well).



cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..

said by TypeS:

Maybe contractors will start designing the lay out of new homes' electrical wiring to offer the best scenario for data

Probably not; you're better off doing cat5/6. I imagine (I'm no expert) that the interference comes from the signal going back to the electrical panel and back out to your destination. The code requires so many dedicated circuits that it's very unlikely that your path won't include a trip back to the panel.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4

When we increase our electrical service at the shop sometime this summer the powerline bridge will be replaced with dedicated Ethernet runs as part of the new wiring.

Powerline networking is a great way to bridge a network where Ethernet is impractical or too expensive to run, but tried and true Cat 5e/6 is still a hell of a lot better.



TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
reply to cybersaga

That's what my "but" was for , it's just plain better to run RJ-45 along side RJ-11 and Coax in new constructions.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to d4m1r

RJ45 is a type of connector (or rather a standard for a physical connector and wiring plan), not a type of cable :P

Fun fact: Ethernet does not use RJ45 connectors, and a standard ethernet connector (8P8C) will not fit into a real RJ45 jack (which nobody has used for decades). Even if you could get it to fit, the wiring wouldn't be right. They're similar, but incompatible. The term has been informally misused for so long, however, that it's become the common name. We can get away with it because nobody uses real RJ45 connectors, so there's little risk of conflict.
--
Developer: Tomato/MLPPP, Linux/MLPPP, etc »fixppp.org


Eug

join:2007-04-14
Canada
reply to TypeS

said by d4m1r:

1) Just tested it at 6:30pm on a weekday afternoon. I am getting 24-28MBps when my laptop is directly connected to the router.

2) Through powerline (downstairs and other side of the house) I am getting 19-24MBps on my laptop. This should be enough to stream 1080p content.

The question though is how consistent that is. I used to get 25-35 Mbps at certain times but at other times, esp. when my wife was at home, I'd sometimes run into glitches streaming even 8 Mbps content. It's probably due to noise changes on the circuits.

The problem with powerline is that it is not incredibly stable. For surfing the web it's fine, but for streaming video it can be more problematic, even when you think you're getting 20+ Mbps speeds.

said by TypeS:

It most likely gets 200Mbps full duplex under perfect conditions. But home electrical wiring was never laid out for carrying data signals so real world you will never see it.

Actually no, since most (200 Mbps) powerline adapters don't even have gigabit Ethernet connections. They usually have 100 Mbps Ethernet connections... and basically never achieve that. As mentioned, expect full duplex speeds well under 50 Mbps, and often below 20 Mbps with minimum speeds sometimes as low as just a couple of Mbps or even 0 for brief periods... hence the problem with video streaming.

--
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