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Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
reply to bryank

Re: Flooring Stapler

That's a heavily debated topic. For bamboo, which I imagine is brittle, I would say staples. I think you'll split tongues using cleats with that kind of flooring.
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"You lie!" Talk about an understatement, Joe.


chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
said by Badonkadonk:

That's a heavily debated topic. For bamboo, which I imagine is brittle, I would say staples. I think you'll split tongues using cleats with that kind of flooring.

This, use staples and play with the air pressure to get the desired depth before committing to banging down the whole floor.
--
Some people are like Slinkies. Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to Badonkadonk
I put in a 25yr warranty bamboo floor. I went with non-carmelized, vertical grain. I also bought and used a HarborFreight flooring nailer. IMHO, it is junk. Oh, it did the job, and for $99, you can't beat it. But it left some shoe/marks in the Bamboo. I know where to look, but most don't notice.

I prefer hardwood (oak, maple, ...) for floors now. The bamboo was for a front room that if future owner has a baby, it is ideal (green lumber! 25 yr finish! clean and not off gassing!). It is bright and clean looking.

But it does splinter. It is strong and flexible. Installs easy. It is brittle as it isn't really wood but a fiber, and can split. Oh, it is very strong (hardness like maple). However, if carmelized, it loses the hardness rating significantly.
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Splat

Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Dish Network
Like most of this stuff, a consumer has to be pretty educated to make the right decision. But I think bamboo probably requires extra consideration of other factors that hardwoods don't have.

From my perspective, when I think of hardwoods, I think how about how good the milling is, quarter or plain sawn and grade. That's after I've decided the species. With bamboo, as you've indicated, there are other items to consider as well.

If a person makes an educated decision, no reason they shouldn't be happy with bamboo, hardwood, whatever it is. It's just the surprises that hurt.
--
"You lie!" Talk about an understatement, Joe.