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mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to TLS2000

Re: Injecting surveys into my browsing session now?

Since there's no laws about browser injection. They don't care. And it doesn't surprise me since they do those win backs all the time.

I ported my number to Telus last year and then they sent me a one time SMS message to come back for a measly $8 discount. At least they didn't keep spamming me.



TLS2000
Crazy Canuck
Premium
join:2004-02-24
Mississauga, ON

True enough. This isn't a way to win me back though. It's really intrusive and rude to interfere with my browsing session just to try and keep me.

It makes me glad that I've switched.
--
Tom



humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter
reply to mlerner

said by mlerner:

Since there's no laws about browser injection.

Then what are the feds using to prosecute hackers when they do man in the middle attacks?
Or redirect users to webpages that are not what they wanted?(DNS hijacks).
Or the latest with that Apple trojan that displays injected ads on webpages?
I don't let the Walmart employees add stuff to my cart so they can increase sales.
I lightly shove crazies out of the way when they try to force their literature on me.

Bloody Sheeples! Quit bending over for the corporations.

OP, contact the CRTC and say that someone(employee) at Rogers hacked your internet connection. Carbon Copy your complaint to the useless media of Canada and see if you can raise enough shit.
The RCMP also has a cyber division(out of Alberta?), so try contacting them as well. Maybe harassment, stalking, wire-tapping, invasion of privacy as a basic charge?

The more the merrier.


TLS2000
Crazy Canuck
Premium
join:2004-02-24
Mississauga, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·Rogers Hi-Speed

Are you serious? You think this is a criminal matter?

I'm not going to go to such a huge effort to punish Rogers because I actually believe that injecting messages into browser sessions can serve a useful purpose. It really is nice to know when I've hit 75% of my usage quota.

It's an annoyance for sure, but I've already taken the best possible action. They aren't getting any more of my money. There's a good chance they'll end up losing my $100/mo cell phone business too. I'm even considering Wind, despite the slower data speeds.
--
Tom



mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to humanfilth

The difference is, those are third party and usually followed by unauthorized hacking. Simply displaying a message in your browser session is not necessarily illegal.

Also since your ISP provides the pipe and connectivity, they own that portion of your service and you may have agreed to it in the terms and conditions which makes it legal.


TBBroadband

join:2012-10-26
Fremont, OH
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·MegaPath
reply to humanfilth

claiming that the connection was hacked is a bit misleading. Especially by claiming it was in fact a Roger's employee when there was no such proof. Also its not stalking, nor really harassment. The OP better read the TOS/AUP before making any false claims against Rogers and any of their employees.



elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
reply to mlerner

said by mlerner:

....and you may have agreed to it in the terms and conditions which makes it legal.

As I have pointed out previously, you cannot consent to being victimized by a criminal act. You cannot legally consent to illegal terms and conditions. You cannot consent under duress or threat of retaliation. It's the Law of Canada.

Just because Rogers posts their Terms and Conditions (and you are compelled to consent to receive service) does not give Rogers a shield against legal liability for illegal acts should any be committed.


TLS2000
Crazy Canuck
Premium
join:2004-02-24
Mississauga, ON

What is illegal about what they've done? It's annoying at best. They inject ads into tv feeds all of the time too, but people don't go running to the RCMP about it.
--
Tom



mlerner
Premium
join:2000-11-25
Nepean, ON
kudos:5
reply to elitefx

Again, who says it's illegal? You pay for access to a network that you don't own much like TV service. The provider has every right to modify your content such as what AOL did.



sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·TekSavvy Cable

well, although I wouldn't call it illegal, it's not the same as AOL ... AOL was a content provider and some of that content was derived from the internet per your requests. Many of the large Telco and Cable ISPs think of themselves that way too. In fact they'd like to be AOLs ... and control what comes across their wires.