dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1309
share rss forum feed


bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks

4 edits

worried about over fertilized yard

New yard planted early November. Kentucky 31 and mix grass.

Because of coming heavy snow and from urging of others, I decided to fertilize the yard...about 10,000 sq.ft. net for the first time THIS SPRING on Thursday---this past Thursday. Southeastern Missouri (the Ozarks).

I used a Scotts broadcast spreader. Oakley's bulk 8-24-24 granules.
Nobody could tell me how to set my spreader. So I checked online with other fertilizers and set my spreader way below what was typical at 2.5. The spreader contained about 30Lbs of the 8-24-24.

To cover entire front and back yard, it took almost all of the 30Lbs but not all.

I realize now that there is some math to getting coverage precisely correct and that I was too hasty to get fertilizer down especially since I didn't know what I was doing. My fault.

Bottom line: I can't believe how much wringing of hands over this has been going on for me. I feel like I'm in a hospital waiting room with a loved one in surgery or something! I'm of course worried that I have seriously and irreparably damaged my new lawn. I just can't remember now how much green-yellowish areas I had before fertilizing. I definitely did have some areas that were green with yellowish tint but it seems like there's more now though I can't be absolutely sure. I fertilized on Thursday (3/21/2013) and today is Sunday (3/24/2013). There are plenty of areas of lush dark green AND while I don't have spots or splotches of this green-yellowish grass, there are some sweeping areas that are green-yellowish. I do know there is also some existing Bermuda grass mixed in my yard as well.

We had immediate snow that stayed down for 36 hours and now rains. The yard is on decent slope up from street. How long does it take to know for sure whether grass is burned...actually burned from fertilizer and that it will die? The clock started ticking about 5:00 PM Thursday.

Please help.

Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
Might be green for a while then it might burn out. Hard to say as I'm not an expert. All I know is you have to apply at the prescribed rate otherwise you can over-do it.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to bcool
A big bag (40lbs?) of Scotts covers 15000 sqft and it has much more nitrogen - so I highly doubt you're in any danger whatsoever.

nyrrule27

join:2007-12-06
Howell, NJ
You should have gotten a drop spreader. It covers more evenly. And that 40 pound bag will not cover 15000 sq ft. My whole property is 15000 sq ft and I needed that and a small bag and I didn't overlap as much as the arrow on the Scott's spreader said to.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
said by nyrrule27:

You should have gotten a drop spreader. It covers more evenly.

And how does that help him now ?


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to nyrrule27
said by nyrrule27:

And that 40 pound bag will not cover 15000 sq ft. My whole property is 15000 sq ft and I needed that and a small bag and I didn't overlap as much as the arrow on the Scott's spreader said to.

That only means you applied at a higher rate than what you were supposed to. My spreader applies almost exactly as the bag says it should - 1/2 bag for my 8000sqft of grass.


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to cowboyro
said by cowboyro:

A big bag (40lbs?) of Scotts covers 15000 sqft and it has much more nitrogen - so I highly doubt you're in any danger whatsoever.

Drop spreaders are not the best for fertilizer! It's very easy to miss strips and if you overlap its double fertilized. Drop spreaders are only good for seeding and powdered lime application where wind is a consideration. Rotary spreaders are proven better for fertilizer applications.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to bcool
When I had cases of over-fertilization, it showed up within a couple of days, at most. Although I never had snow on such a yard.

In any case, since you've got plenty of water on it, methinks that should've diluted and distributed the fertilizer well below the threshold of burning.
--
Wacky Races 2012!

Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
reply to Msradell
I was going to make this comment.

The neighbor next to us uses a Scott's drop spreader and loads it with Scott's weed and feed or what ever it is. She always winds up with darker green and lighter green stripes in her lawn.

I use a Scott's broadcast spreader and don't have the issue. I also don't use a combined weed and feed. Not sure if that helps the issue.
--
"Above all, I would teach him to tell the truth. Truth-telling, I have found, is the key to responsible citizenship. The thousands of criminals I have seen in 40 years of law enforcement have had one thing in common: Every single one was a liar."
J.E.H.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to bcool
It's only 8 on the N...if you had over-applied 21-3-3 that might be a different story.

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1
reply to bcool
Echoing what John said, you would be more likely to have problems if you had applied ~30 pounds of ammonium sulfate or some other high nitrogen fert. You'd have a hayfield of epic proportions by this point.


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to nyrrule27
said by nyrrule27:

You should have gotten a drop spreader. It covers more evenly. And that 40 pound bag will not cover 15000 sq ft. My whole property is 15000 sq ft and I needed that and a small bag and I didn't overlap as much as the arrow on the Scott's spreader said to.

I totally disagree with you.

A broadcast spreader is much more forgiving and you'll never have "stripes" even if you're a novice.

A novice can use a broadcast spreader and cover everything relatively even much faster.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to bcool
You're really not going to be able to tell if you did any damage 'til the grass enters its growing season. Normally, (N) nitrogen should be applied at a rate of 1#/1,000sq.ft. A 30# bag of 8-24-24 contains about 2.4 pounds of available nitrogen... not nearly enough to burn 10,000 sq.ft. of yard.

Remember what the the items are for:
Nitrogen (N) for growth
Phosphorus (P) for root development
Postassium (K) for disease resistence

Generally, your lawn requires much less K or P than do crop fields... what you used was an agricultural fertilizer, not a grass/sod fertilizer. You applied way too much phosphorus and potassium, but not nearly enough nitrogen. Nitrogen is the villian in burning grass plants... You should never really apply as much P or K as you do N. A balanced fertilizer such as 12-12-12 or 16-16-16 is as radical as you should ever get. Most lawn fertilizers are considerably higher in N than either of the other two elements, because that's what the grass needs to grow.

Bottom line... you didn't burn your lawn out, but you shouldn't use that formulation again for a healthy, green lawn. 30-5-5 is more than adequate for your needs.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!


bcool
Premium
join:2000-08-25
The Ozarks
said by Pacrat:

You're really not going to be able to tell if you did any damage 'til the grass enters its growing season. Normally, (N) nitrogen should be applied at a rate of 1#/1,000sq.ft. A 30# bag of 8-24-24 contains about 2.4 pounds of available nitrogen... not nearly enough to burn 10,000 sq.ft. of yard.

Remember what the the items are for:
Nitrogen (N) for growth
Phosphorus (P) for root development
Postassium (K) for disease resistence

Generally, your lawn requires much less K or P than do crop fields... what you used was an agricultural fertilizer, not a grass/sod fertilizer. You applied way too much phosphorus and potassium, but not nearly enough nitrogen. Nitrogen is the villain in burning grass plants... You should never really apply as much P or K as you do N. A balanced fertilizer such as 12-12-12 or 16-16-16 is as radical as you should ever get. Most lawn fertilizers are considerably higher in N than either of the other two elements, because that's what the grass needs to grow.

Bottom line... you didn't burn your lawn out, but you shouldn't use that formulation again for a healthy, green lawn. 30-5-5 is more than adequate for your needs.

Thank you and everyone for your help. I'd like to show my math in terms of determining my actual lawn size:

Double Lot: 100' x 127' = 12,700 sq.ft
Living quarters: 1365 sq.ft.
Garage: 528 sq.ft
Driveway: 700 sq.ft
Deck: 80 sq.ft
Misc.: 27 sq.ft.
_________________________________________
Lawn = 10,000 Sq.ft

The fertilizer came in 50# bag. I estimate that I poured out, let's say just to be safe, 40# of the bag into Scotts spreader....one of those small $34 spreaders. Did not fill the hopper to the brim, but it was filled up pretty good. Set the spreader on 2.5 and tried to keep moving. The front yard is on good slope so I got a workout.

So that would be about 3.2 Lbs of Nitrogen on 10,000 Sq.ft given that my spreading technique was even handed.

Pacrat: I'll remember your advice when I fertilize again....perhaps in a month?


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to mityfowl
said by mityfowl:

A broadcast spreader is much more forgiving and you'll never have "stripes" even if you're a novice.

NEVER say never. I can prove you wrong regarding the stripes, much to my own chagrin.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to bcool
If you're going to fertilize again that soon, you might want to go with just urea (something like 45-0-0). Granule size is generally quite a bit larger than most granule fertilizers so you may have to adjust your flow rate. I would err on the safe side and start with very conservative spreader setting. It's pretty easy to put more on with the speader... pretty much impossible to remove it once it's spread. Again... you're looking for a delivery rate of 1#/1,000 sq.ft. for nitrogen. Assuming 50# bag... and a 45-0-0 formulation: 45% of 50# would be 22.5# of N/10,000 sq.ft. if you use the whole bag... That would be more than twice as much as you want (2.25#/1,000sq.ft.). You should adjust your delivery rate to use a little less than 1/2 bag to do the whole lawn. It wont look like you're puting much down, but it's pretty potent and you really don't need much. Pure urea is "tricky" to use, but if you insist on using Ag-type bulk fertilizers, it should be available wherever you bought that other stuff you used. You definitely don't need/want any more phosphorus or potassium until early fall... at least, not at that formulation. The exact formula you use really doesn't matter a whole lot... just shoot for 1#(N)/1,000sq.ft. I think Scott's Turf-Builder is like... 28-3-3 or something very close to that.

You can suit yourself, but I wouldn't fertilize again that soon. About every 8 weeks would be good... about mid-May.

There's an adage about lawn-feeding products: Use half as much as directed, twice as often.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!