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Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
Reviews:
·Comcast

planted grass over dead weeds

Last summer I was getting a lot dandelion type of weeds. I used different type of weed killer that was safe to use on lawns. In Sept after 6 months they was not killed out. That got me pissed off. I got some vegetation killer Well lets say I got the weeds killed but also the grass.
Right now my plan was to get some fertilizer and wait 2 weeks and use this to plant the seeds Scotts Turf Builder 20 lb. EZ Seed.
Would this work out ok or what some recommendations?
This for mobile home park. The lot size is about 75ft by 200 ft and is in the sun when it shines. It just patches of about 500sq ft total if my math is correct.
--
Caddy


xj31

join:2005-09-25
Lake Villa, IL

Good luck with that. It has been my experience that after using vegetation killer, nothing will grow for about a year.



mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to Caddyroger



Well the label says you can re-plant in just a few weeks, but I've never tried it. I agree it may be dicey, but you could always try a small test-patch and see if it grows?



Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
reply to xj31

It been about 7 months with a lot of rain. The ground here probably was not frozen no more the 3 weeks. So i am was thinking maybe the weed killer is washed out by now.
--
Caddy



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to Caddyroger

Highly depends on the killer used. If you used glyphosphate (active ingredient in Round-up) the effect only lasts for few weeks as the substance disintegrates quickly in ground.
Now if you used something that claims to prevent anything from growing for 1 year that's a different story...
So... what did you use? That's the key question...



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to Caddyroger

2 applications of 2 4 D (Weed B Gone) would have taken out the dandelions and left the grass.



Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
reply to cowboyro

Ii was round up
--
Caddy



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT

Then you're good, the effect is long gone.



hortnut
Huh?

join:2005-09-25
PNW
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Caddyroger

Some years ago I had a crappy lawn in the front and back, uneven, a few weeds and patchy grass. About 10,000 sq feet. Had all the weeds down using 2,4-D, [main active ingredient in Weed-B-Gone at that time]. Soil was heavy with clay and not much organic matter.

Sprayed entire lawn with Roundup. Waited about 10 days. Then went over it with a rear tine tiller, set a few inches into the soil. Raked and leveled it out with fill dirt where needed or from high spots. Since I owned a Bobcat and had access to high quality mulch, worked some of that into the soil.

Planted high quality seed, covered seed with a light layer of the same mulch. Since I had installed a sprinkler system, used it to manually lightly water and spot watered some other areas with hose. It came up great. I added fertilizer after it came up and after I tested it for Nitrogen levels with my kit.

This was in Aloha Oregon. I did mine in the Fall. Mine too, was all in the full sun.

Helped 3-4 friends do the same to their yards.

hth


xj31

join:2005-09-25
Lake Villa, IL
reply to Caddyroger

Yea, Roundup is pretty weak. You'll be fine. I always used Ortho, they used to call it Triox, I think it's like Groundclear now


Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
reply to Caddyroger

Plain roundup or the one with the sterilizer?



Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
reply to Caddyroger

I possible that I used Ortho ground clear but not positive. I used both tring to get the dandelions killed clear
--
Caddy



djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
reply to Caddyroger

I would test with a small patch, especially if you aren't sure.



35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA
reply to Caddyroger

Click for full size
I used a custom mixture of 2,4-D and Glyphosphate 2 years ago when I redid about 10,000 sq. ft. of lawn. I planted 4 weeks after I burned everything to the ground. If it's been 7 months you should be fine. Keep in mind if you plant in the Spring you'll get more weeds. Ideally you plant in the Fall. I planted in the Spring and understood I'd battle weeds because of it. No big deal. It might take 2-3 years to get the lawn in order but you'll get there.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to xj31

said by xj31:

Good luck with that. It has been my experience that after using vegetation killer, nothing will grow for about a year.

That Completely Depends on what type of killer you use. Many of them deteriorate very rapidly, such as Roundup and you can replant in several weeks. The directions will tell you how soon you can replant.


35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA
reply to Caddyroger

Even the strongest most deadly weed killers say you can plant after 3-4 weeks max. The only time you shouldn't is if you use a weed/crabgrass preventer as that would hurt grass germination. In that case it makes a barrier on the soil under the grass so if you burn it down and rake the soil to prep for grass you've broken the barrier and should be able to plant grass. The only other scenario would be you used something illegal which might sterilize the soil like boiling water, gas, etc.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill


xj31

join:2005-09-25
Lake Villa, IL
reply to Msradell

said by Msradell:

said by xj31:

Good luck with that. It has been my experience that after using vegetation killer, nothing will grow for about a year.

That Completely Depends on what type of killer you use. Many of them deteriorate very rapidly, such as Roundup and you can replant in several weeks. The directions will tell you how soon you can replant.

Yea we got that. Seems like a few posts snuck in while you were replying to that.

stephenmoore

join:2013-03-28
reply to Caddyroger

quote:
Good luck with that. It has been my experience that after using vegetation killer, nothing will grow for about a year.
Agree with you experienced it...

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I've laid sod less than a week after a strong application of Roundup without any problems.



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

Per Roundup documentation... the product goes inert within 4 hours of contacting soil. Roundup is not a vegetation killer per se. It is a general weed/grass killer. I know it wont touch such things like poison ivy and such. Ortho used to market a product called Triox which was a vegetation killer when use as directed. Supposedly good for 6 months or more. That stuff can be applied to bare gound to keep weeds and such from even germinating. I've used both products and reseeded areas where I applied Roundup within 7-10 days with no problem at all. Roundup only works on living weeds/grass. One thing to remember regarding dandelions, though... they are a perennial weed and must be root-killed to really to get rid of all of them. Since they do not all blossom at the same time, it's very possible that that even though you think you gottem all, you missed some. Honestly, I've never found anything better for dandelions in a lawn than Weed B Gone. I keep a 1 qt. spray bottle of WBG mix (I never buy the "ready to use" stuff)on the handle of my walk-behind mower and shoot them as I mow the lawn. That way I know I've covered the entire area of the lawn. I also, periodically, walk my lawn with that same squirt bottle and usually find a few more that have blown in from the neighbor's weed farm. I hesitate to use pre-emergents because I often want to overseed areas from time to time. If you stay on top of them, it's no big deal to spot treat as they emerge. It's when they get away that treating the whole lawn is sometimes necessary. I hate to waste money treating the entire lawn, when the weeds are only a couple of per cent of the total area. I do have the time to putter around, being retired, but I still say that you'd save both time and money by applying weed killer only where it's needed... on the weeds.

Also, it goes without saying that a full, healthy lawn is much less prone to weed infestations than a weak, patchy lawn. When the grass is nice and full, it's harder for weed seeds to reach the soil surface to germinate. Granular weed'n'feeds work quite well, but sometimes it's difficult to apply them most efficiently. I try to use products like that in the early morning when there's considerable dew still on the grass. I've found that a heavy dew is much better than after a rain or watering, in getting dry products to stick as they should, to be most effective.
--
Keep your eye on the ball, your shoulder to the wheel, your nose to the grindstone, and your ear to the ground. Now, try to work in that position!!!