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cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

Anyone install an AAV?

I vented the washer to the attic, during a renovation. But I haven't connected to the main stack.

Then I came across an article on plumbing and it appears I can just cap with the AAV - Air Admittance Valve. It is one way (allows air in, but no gases out).

So, can I just add the AAV to the pipe in the attic, rather than messing with the house stack? It appears within code as long as I have a main stack (I do) and don't block access to the AAV (and label). Plenty of air moving in the attic.

Anyone have these? any issue? Noise issues? lifespan?
--
Splat


MrFixit1

join:1999-11-26
Madison, WI

Am going to request more info on just what you are referring to ?
Trying to picture why you would run a separate vent line to a dishwasher or clothes washer ?
Yes you should have an air gap in the drain line for either , but that is not really the same as a stack vent .


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
reply to cableties

I have five air admittance valves in my home, installed under the sink in each bathroom and the kitchen sink. I am the first owner and have lived in this house since 2006. I have had no problem with any of them. The builder felt that the AAV improved the integrity of the roof. There is only one roof vent at the opposite end of the house where the sewer outfall is. The outfall is on the north end of the house and the vent is on the south end of the house.


averagedude

join:2002-01-30
San Diego, CA

2 edits
reply to cableties

Here is the link to the AAV manufactures home page:
»www.ipscorp.com/plumbing/studor

The simple answer is that you can use this "mechanical" device for your intended purpose, BUT...

Remember this is a mechanical device, and like all moving parts devices must be maintained to work properly - follow manufactures instructions. This is close to but not an "install it and forget" piece of equipment. Make sure you mount the AAV in an accessible area for servicing.

AAV's are used all over the world so this is not some new fangled piece of equipment.

As it can't be said enough:
Just remember to follow the manufactures installation instructions!

edit spelling



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
reply to cableties

I use one on our kitchen island sink.

However as others have posted it is a mechanical device. Since the new vent is already in the attic I'd just connect it to the existing vent stack.

/tom



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to cableties

AAV's work great for venting plumbing systems most of the time. Using it on a washer may be a little dicey because in most cases you use hot water so they potential for moisture in the venting gases is quite high, such as you would save from a dryer. They are not designed to be used for dryer vents! Venting the moist air into the attic will drastically increase the chances for mold.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

1 recommendation

said by Msradell:

They are not designed to be used for dryer vents! Venting the moist air into the attic will drastically increase the chances for mold.

I'm confused.

If I understand AAV operation correctly they open in response to partial vacuum to let air into the DWV system. Nothing should ever escape or you would be venting sewer gas into the living space.

/tom


tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:5

If you are using it for one device, 2" pipe size max, you can use the cheaper AAV (ie old style)... new style are rated for toilets and are pricey-- 20$.. old style are around 5$. Only difference is the new style are rated for positive pressure, which will never happen in that washer pipe, only close to a shitter.

new style

»www.amazon.com/Oatey-39018-Sure-···ords=aav

old style

»www.amazon.com/Oatey-39012-In-Li···ords=aav

they probably have both at yer big box store.. I recommend using an Ace hardware though..

oh, and use liquid pipe dope or tape dope on the threads, but only tighten it lightly by hand, doesnt have to be tight.

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to cableties

Depending on local code, they may be OK, a no-go, or a special variance item... In my municipality, they require a special approval (basically, you have to show that tying into a stack would exceed reasonable effort, before they'll approve the AAV).

That said - you've done the hard part, getting the vent to the attic... Running across to the closest stack, and tying in "properly" would be fairly easy; and would be my suggestion.



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to cableties

Ok, thanks for the ideas and OPs.

I think I will just connect to the stack vent. Since the feed is going up there, and I have all the PVC already (and ABS cement to PVC-Green), along with vent T...

Just didn't want to "disturb" the stack going to the roof. (trick is to cut into stack and not move it, grrrrr)

And I didn't want to perf the roof for independent stack for washer.

FYI- The washer pumps so much force with water (on 2nd floor) that any air in the line goes to the largest opening, aka the toilet.


Now go and laugh. No really. Think, bidet. Yeah, NEVER do you want to have mother nature call while "another load" is spinning/rinse in the washer. NO NO NO! (bluup bluup bluup!)
Just bad builder and plumbing.
--
Splat


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1

I would recommend seeing if you can obtain some type of saddle tee that can be glued on to the existing vent stack. They are usually available at your home improvement store. Use care when drilling out the opening in the vertical section that, the plastic piece you cut out does not fall into the vent stack and clog up the sewer line.

There are some examples on this webpage:

»www.lowes.com/Search=saddle+tee?···le+tee#!


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to cableties

said by cableties:

Just didn't want to "disturb" the stack going to the roof. (trick is to cut into stack and not move it, grrrrr)

Why? It should create any major problem.


tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:5
reply to Mr Matt

said by Mr Matt:

I would recommend seeing if you can obtain some type of saddle tee that can be glued on to the existing vent stack. They are usually available at your home improvement store. Use care when drilling out the opening in the vertical section that, the plastic piece you cut out does not fall into the vent stack and clog up the sewer line.

There are some examples on this webpage:

»www.lowes.com/Search=saddle+tee?···le+tee#!

saddle tee is a good idea... forgot bout that

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)


Raphion

join:2000-10-14
Samsara
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to cableties

said by cableties:

Now go and laugh. No really. Think, bidet. Yeah, NEVER do you want to have mother nature call while "another load" is spinning/rinse in the washer. NO NO NO! (bluup bluup bluup!)
Just bad builder and plumbing.

That sounds strange. I wouldn't think you could push water down a drain fast enough to make a toilet bubble, and an AAV would not solve that, since it only lets air in, not pressure out.

It sounds more to me like your main stack is filling with water faster than it drains down the main drain line. You could be seeing early warning of a clog in your main drain line.

I know when my main drain line had a ball of roots in it, my toilet would bubble just before water began backing up out the shower drain.

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL

It ain't legal in IL., especially when it can be vented the right way .... connect to the stack ...