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pende_tim
Premium
join:2004-01-04
Andover, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Replacement Window Costs

Just wondering if anyone has ever gotten a quote from a company to do replacement windows.

I received a mailing today from Pella offering $100. off replacement windows, Last week Anderson was hawking their replacement windows.

Has anyone priced these services, for lets say a 38 x 58 double hung window? Low E glass, mid grade sash?

Just curious as to what it costs.
--
The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

The price of replacement windows is all over the place. Anderson and Pella are by far the most expensive. The really strange thing is, size doesn't really seem to matter, it seems like the pricing is one price fits all. Do some checking around in your area and talk with some people who had windows replaced to try to find a local reputable company. I had quotes for over $24,000 to do just the front of my home and ended up paying about $9000. The windows I ended up with your cellular PVC, so they can be painted to match other services. They have a 20 year guarantee! Unless you want to go extremely low budget, I would stay away from vinyl windows. They are very cheap, but look it.

You probably want to go with Windows when they take out the old sashes and frames before installing the new window. Some contractors just take out the sashes and install within the old frame. This is a cheaper way, but it reduces the overall size of the window.



pende_tim
Premium
join:2004-01-04
Andover, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Thanks. I knew they would be expensive. not in the market for windows, but just looking for a cost for my information.

What was the cost per window, do you recall?
--
The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma
reply to pende_tim

I just spent $17k to have 11 windows replaced. All of the windows in my house are monsters. My master bedroom has a 108" x 36" picture window with dual horizontal sliders and the two front windows are 60" x 60" horizontal sliders. Two bedrooms each have a 96" x 36" picture window with dual horizontal sliders, another bedroom on the back corner of the house has two of these same windows, and there is one more in the family room. Two bathrooms and the laundry room have what I would call "regular sized" double-hung windows. In addition, they fitted all of my windows as well as my 3 sets of 108" three-pane sliding-doors with removable kevlar hurricane screens.

The windows are argon gas-filled Low E, insulated vinyl replacement windows with a 20-year warranty.
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...



brian
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Lake Forest, CA
reply to pende_tim

We replaced 7 windows last spring. We went with the Milgard Tuscany.

Materials:
33 x 58.75 - $524
32.75 x 58.75 - $524
68.75 x 58.75 - $745
91.75 x 45.25 - $1030
3 of 67.75 x 45.25 @ $693ea - $2079

Total materials = $4902, but they were having a "half off sale" so we only paid $2451. Labor was $1050.

The first three windows listed above are for the front of the house and had wood trim on the exterior with dry rot and termite damage. We elected to not replace this wood and this gave us the opportunity to do full replacements (the other windows are sitting inside the old aluminum frames). This required quite a bit of stucco work that cost an additional $1100 (also includes a small area patched around a new electrical panel).

So "out the door" with everything it was just under $4800.
--
flickr gallery | photo blog (rarely updated) | play mafia!


harald

join:2010-10-22
Columbus, OH
kudos:1
reply to pende_tim

Man, did you hit a raw nerve!!

I would like to replace three windows, 55 years old.

Stock Andersens will fit - and match the resst of the house. Price at Home Depot - ~$3000.

My wife wants them to install.

Well, they won't install stock windows. They have to be custom-made.

$13,000.

Fitted to the stucco exterior with aluminum trim coil.

$77 per old window to haul them away - The aluminum is worth nearly that!!



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to pende_tim

I learned to replace my own windows. It can be a royal *PITA*, but it's usually a heck of a lot more cheaper than paying someone else to do it; furthermore, I think I can do a better job, even though it probably takes me twice as much time to do it.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to pende_tim

For you guys with experience, is it true that for my aluminum windows that have failed (fogged) and are "rocked-in" i.e. have stone which keeps the window from being easily removed, that the way these would be replaced would be to cut the old ones out (dunno, with an angle grinder/metal saw of some sort) and then tilt new ones in their place?

I can't imagine otherwise breaking-out the rockwork, cutting thru the tape-over around the perimeter, and removing the windows whole/in one piece in basically reverse order of installation...



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand


This is where a sawzall is your friend.

Measure the opening before you cut out the old windows and have new ones made to fit.

Piece 0' Caek

--
March is National Noodle Month



35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA
reply to pende_tim

We had acoustical windows installed last year. They ran $575 each for Harvey's which is the top of the line. The Anderson windows in the new garage last year were $275 each. That wasn't installed but it shouldn't run more then $150 a window to install. For a typical window you should be in the $400 to $600 each range tops.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill



FreedomBuild
Well done is better than well said
Premium
join:2004-10-08
Rockford, IL
reply to harald

Got hit with sticker shock, based on your description, and my experience, I've an idea why custom made. That is why you stay away from the big chains and go with a reputable local contractor. I deal direct with Pella, Anderson and a few other brands in my area. Bottomline, Big Box stores don't always offer the best price and customer service they have to pay their CEO's and stockholders. Trust me when I say that half the labor as well as a good markup on the windows went to HD
--
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz/blog/



Coma
Thanks Steve
Premium
join:2001-12-30
NirvanaLand


A few years ago, I met a general contractor at Sam's club advertising everything under the sun including 'Replacement Windows'.

Since I had a few projects with my real estate investments, I asked him do some work for me. I sorta recall spending 35K -40K for all sorts of improvements.

Anyway, the last bill from him was $900 for replacing an 8' - 3 window picture window looking out towards the water.

YMMV . . .

--
March is National Noodle Month


tcope
Premium
join:2003-05-07
Sandy, UT
kudos:2
reply to pende_tim

I just had my 22 year old windows replaced about a month ago. 13 windows for about $8,000. I never knew I could finance them for 60 months, interest free ($130/month).

That averages to about $600/window. I think that might be a little high. I have three larger windows but then there are also 3 small ones in the basement. From asking around, this price did not seem unreasonable. All windows have double e coating.

They are vinyl and I think they look very good. The color is not perfect for the exterior siding but that is mostly because the color of my siding sucks.

The company I used only does residential replacement windows. They have a lifetime warranty and they are local to me. They also mention if a screen is ever damaged that I just need to bring it to them and they will repair for free. Not a big deal but a nice touch.

Some before and after photos:

»plus.google.com/photos/100796696···23799137



Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA
reply to pende_tim

Always ask:
Nail on Fin? They take the outside trim off and completely remove the window.

Replacement? They cut out the old window, piece in a new slightly smaller window and Glue the frame to the old one and over the outside. More prone to future leaks.



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to pende_tim

A LOT is going to depend on the size of the windows as well - standard sizes will be a LOT cheaper than non-standard sizes. When my IL's were looking to replace windows at their last house they found out that every window was a non-standard size - very expensive.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to Coma

said by Coma:


This is where a sawzall is your friend.

Measure the opening before you cut out the old windows and have new ones made to fit.

Piece 0' Caek

Wow, a sawzall huh. Hard to imagine it wouldn't make a wavy cut, and wonder too about what Jtmo says i.e. they "piece in a new slightly smaller window and Glue the frame to the old one and over the outside."

Would love to see pics of this (aluminum windows being cut-out and re-fitted with replacements) so if anyone knows a site where this process is shown by all means please post a link!


Jtmo
Premium
join:2001-05-20
Novato, CA

Here is video of a sash window retrofit window installation:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0HODrbpBG4


Sliding windows:

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zpHN08cCng

This is the one that causes the most issues with leaks and also with any future siding replacements as you just glued the window to the outside over the siding.

This all comes via a contractor consultant for a project with hundreds of windows to be replaced this year.
Conclusion, nail on fin total replacement costs more for labor but less for the window and long term issues.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·Cogeco Cable

1 recommendation

reply to pende_tim

Here is my place:
The old windows, interior trim removed.




The window opening, no window. Old window frame removed (using sawzall).



The new window, before addition of low expansion spray foam.



The new window, all done.



I wouldn't dream of leaving the old frames in.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
reply to Jtmo

Click for full size
Click for full size
The jeld-wen video is how I've done all mine. I've been lucky with getting stock sizes from the big box stores. I've probably done about 12 or so in the course of the last 8years in my current and previous home. Taking out the existing and replacing is maybe a 30min process. Making new jamb extensions, cutting new trim, and re-wrapping the exterior with new aluminum can get a little time consuming.
--
Some people are like Slinkies. Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


kontos
xyzzy

join:2001-10-04
West Henrietta, NY

1 recommendation

reply to Msradell

said by Msradell:

The windows I ended up with your cellular PVC, so they can be painted to match other services. They have a 20 year guarantee! Unless you want to go extremely low budget, I would stay away from vinyl windows. he overall size of the window.

Umm, do you know what the 'V' in PVC stands for?


jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL

1 recommendation

hehe... that's just the most obvious of the skewed information in this thread.

We have a contractor consulting saying you really should spend the extra money on the install for a complete tearout with nailing fin -- which stands to reason, since the contractor gets paid for the installation and doesn't care about anything else! While I agree that nailing fin is fine for an addition or if they're already tearing off siding to replace it, there's really no other benefit. No, your windows will not be "glued" in place -- they get screwed on the left and right side, and have aluminum capping wrapped around the outside to make it blend in with the wall (varies for brick or stone exterior). That capping gets caulked to the window frame for a good weatherproof seal -- exactly the same caulking as you'd need with nailing fin.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to Cho Baka

said by Cho Baka:

I wouldn't dream of leaving the old frames in.

That really depends on the type of old window and how the installation was done. I have a couple of 50's era houses which I will need to do the windows on at some point. These were quality wood windows for the time and they were installed correctly. This means that they are properly flashed from under the siding to over the top of the outside trim. It would be not only extremely expensive to remove the old frames to totally replace but would also be very destructive to the structure requiring much siding work as well as an entire repainting of the exterior, not to mention the destruction to the interior and a similar total repainting of the interior. The trim in the house is now only available custom made and basically it would be a nightmare both inside and out.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to jester121

said by jester121:

No, your windows will not be "glued" in place -- they get screwed on the left and right side, and have aluminum capping wrapped around the outside to make it blend in with the wall (varies for brick or stone exterior). That capping gets caulked to the window frame for a good weatherproof seal -- exactly the same caulking as you'd need with nailing fin.

Good to know; I've been wondering about this and your explanation has helped me, thanks.


FreedomBuild
Well done is better than well said
Premium
join:2004-10-08
Rockford, IL
reply to pende_tim


Not Egress compliant window size
One of my local realtor friends posted this . I'm sure the window price was right at the time. Now the the total home price is wrong...

"Dear fellow Realtors, sadly your seller client converted a three bedroom home into a one bedroom home by failing to honor egress code with these replacement windows."

Just thought I would share this tidbit of information
--
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz/blog/

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I would wager that the homeowner replaced old windows with same size and style.



FreedomBuild
Well done is better than well said
Premium
join:2004-10-08
Rockford, IL

1 recommendation

Getting a replacement window to fit inside an existing framed opening does not equal the same size as original, however there are some manufacturers that don't have thick jambs (They are built with thin frame profiles to allow maximum window and glass size) These weren't. The Realtor took a close overall shot to illustrate. I know this realtor and her family
--
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz
»www.rockfordremodeling.biz/blog/


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

You are missing my point. The old windows did not have to meet code as being egress. Once replaced, they had to be brought up to code even if that means modifications to the structure. It is not enough to replace old windows with new of the same style and size. The new ones must meet code on egress.


Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV

I can't tell if it has tilt in removable sashes. If so then it wouldn't matter on the size I wouldn't think. Since you can remove the sashes to get the full opening. Plus that looks like a standard size window. A normal person should be able to go through it. But the picture isn't clear enough to show actual size.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

From what I have read, tilt in sashes don't count for egress according to code.



35245635

join:2013-03-04
North Reading, MA

3 edits
reply to pende_tim

It doesn't have to be that big to meet code.

"An egress window must satisfy all four International Residential Code (IRC) criteria:
Minimum width of opening: 20 in.
Minimum height of opening: 24 in.
Minimum net clear opening: 5.7 sq. ft. (5.0 sq. ft. for ground floor).
Maximum sill height above floor: 44 in."

From the picture posted it sure looks like it passed the IRC code. A large coffee cup is what 6" high? It clearly meets the height and net opening requirements. It might be very very close on the width but we're talking maybe 19" instead of 20" but again that's impossible to see from the picture. It appears to be around 22" wide IMHO. The window height above the floor is the only thing in question and that wouldn't have changed.
--
"Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others." - Winston Churchill