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bjbrock

@wallacemgt.com
reply to amwdrizz

Re: [IPv6] Comcast IPv6 Address Assignment/Delegation

According to the IPv6 RFC's, Your ISP should not be assigning you an IP but rather a 48-bit Global ID(Site ID). The next 16 bits should be your's for sub-netting anyway you want. This give you a 64-bit prefix plus a 64-bit identifier for your IPv6 address of your router or modem. The ISP then routes according to the Global ID and not the IP. Routing is done by routing to your 48-bit Global ID and the next-hop is the link-local address of your router or modem. Since there are approximately 35 trillion possible Site ID's, it is egregious to force you to one IP not to mention thumbing their nose at the RFC's and beautifully designed IPv6. IMHO.



NetDog
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Parker, CO
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Comcast IPv6 Home User
said by bjbrock :

Since there are approximately 35 trillion possible Site ID's, it is egregious to force you to one IP not to mention thumbing their nose at the RFC's and beautifully designed IPv6.

We are talking about Comcast here so I will give input from a Comcast point of view..

Comcast uses DHCPv6 and DHCPv6-PD to allocate its customer IP addresses if your using IPv4 or IPv6. With that said the router needs to request three addresses:

Single IPv4 Address for the Routers WAN
Single IPv6 Address for the Routers WAN
Prefix-Delegation for the LAN interface (routers can request a smaller prefix up to a /60)
--
Comcaster.. Network Engineer with NETO

bjbrock9

join:2002-10-28
Mcalester, OK

1 recommendation

I'm sure this works well for residential sites that only need one simple configuration, but what about commercial customers that need a more complex routing structure. Is the process the same for commercial customers?

I have several small branches that use Comcast. I know my routers won't do /60 prefixes and I will need more than one sub-net at the locations.

I was simply going by the RFC's and I'm sure different ISP's will do different implementations (just like they do with IPv4). But every stray from standards makes it harder for me, the consumer, to keep up with configurations.

AT&T will be upgrading my Home Office MIS to IPv6 and it will be interesting to see their take on it.

Thank you for giving me the reasoning behind Comcast's method. Will my commercial accounts be configured this same way?