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jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Vonage

Storage Array

I put in small to medium video surveillance systems - Windows-based computer with a processor board for the video. Usually the systme is on an SSD drive and we put in a couple of large SATA drives to store the video.

Looking to put in a larger system - probably around 100 cameras, which would have 4 Windows computers. I'm looking to rack mount everything, and instead of putting drives in the computer I would like to get a raid array.

I was thinking a 15-drive array with 2 or 3TB drives. The array would be shared across the 4 computers - probably 4 volumes, one for each computer.

I have no idea where to start - what manufacturer; how to physically connect to the comptuers (SAN?). Clueless.

Any suggestions?
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.


aguen
Premium
join:2003-07-16
Grants Pass, OR
kudos:2

Need way more details about the type of cameras (100, really?). What resolution are they and what codex will be used? What will the retention requirements be for the video?

Whats the budget for storage options?



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to jaa

I would strongly recommend you reach out to NetApp and discuss with them what your needs are from a SAN device. When you start talking about 15-disk arrays and storing lots of video from multiple Windows machines at once (protocol is your choice -- iSCSI, CIFS/SMB, whatever), doing things the Right Way(tm) is a better investment in the long run (trust me). Other vendors include EMC, IBM, HP, Cisco, and Brocade. There's another one I'm missing/have forgotten because their name slips my mind...
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.



pnjunction
Teksavvy Extreme
Premium
join:2008-01-24
Toronto, ON
kudos:1

Yeah we use NetApp here, I remember being pretty shocked at the price we pay for those things though.

Synology makes some rack-mounted units, I haven't heard much about them (there is not much in the way of reviews for 10+ drive business units?) but the neat thing about them is that they have surveillance software built-in, so I think all you need after that is a network and IP cameras. Their high-end units say they support 70 cameras each. If you want an easy solution that might be worth looking at, but I suppose you might have special requirements or simply a desire to implement a more DIY solution.



jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Vonage

1 edit
reply to jaa

We have surveillance systems we use - video search and other features. The company I subcontract to (I do the computer work) is familiar with that system.

Our "usual" is 200Gb per camera, which typically gets 1 to 2 months of recording. This system will replace an existing system that has cameras that record 640x480.

I'm looking for about 50Tb of RAID-protected storage. Throughput is not an issue - a single SATA 7200 drive can easily handle all the recording needs of a 32-camera system, so any array should be able to handle 4 computers.

I was looking at Synology as a low-end (low-cost) array.

RS2212+ is a 10-disk unit that we could start with with 4TB drives, and if needed add another 12-disk expansion unit.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

Regardless of who/what company you go with, please make sure you do two things: 1) get a support contract and keep it active, and 2) do regular backups. I cannot stress these two points enough when relying on a black-box vendor.

When/if you have issues with your filer, all questions/issues should go to the vendor -- you have to be 100% reliant on them for everything (that's both a blessing and a curse).

The need for backups (preferably to something that you have full control over and involves less vendor lock-in) is important, because you should assume that at some point you will encounter problems with your filer. And of course make sure you actually do/try a restoration in advance, rather than wait until that dreadful day when everything goes belly-up only to find out that your backups are hosed.

I also recommend asking whichever vendor you go with up front if they provide the hard disks for you or if you can use/purchase your own. You'd be surprised how much this matters. In the case of NetApp, for example, the filers I've worked with require you use disks sent to you from NetApp directly. There are a lot of (very justified) reasons for this, but it also means taking drive failures seriously, as (depending on your support contract terms) it might take multiple days to get a replacement drive from the vendor. On the flip side, if you're able to use your own disks, you might be unhappily surprised one day when model XYZ123 disappears from the market and XYZ124 appears, only to find that the LBA counts have changed and the filer requires all media to have matching LBA counts -- or possibly you get bit by a drive firmware issue (they're becoming more and more common).

Just stuff to consider before making a purchase.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to jaa

Listen to what koitsu is tellin' ya. When those monster arrays are working right they are awesome. But sometimes they fail in mysterious ways... My BIL managed a group a couple years back that was using a 96-disk SAN, 2TB on each disk. It was attached to racks of servers, virtualized out the wazoo, used by other groups in the company, on a worldwide basis. (Think about servers with 1TB of RAM and hundreds of VM's running at a time!) NONE of the groups that were USING the systems wanted to spend the money for a 2nd SAN to keep backups. Then one day the SAN just locked up. Solid. Remote support couldn't fix it; onsite support couldn't fix it. They ended up shipping the entire SAN array back to the vendor for their engineering folks to figure out what the hell went wrong.... So yeah, the technology is freakin' awesome, until it isn't.



jaa
Premium
join:2000-06-13
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
·Vonage
reply to koitsu

I will look at support contracts. No backups though. It is storing surveillance video, if it is lost no big deal - just reformat and start over.
--
NOTHING justifies terrorism. We don't negotiate with terrorists. Those that support terrorists are terrorists.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

Ah good. As long as everything can be lost in the case of utter failure, you'll be fine. Otherwise stories like this are ones I use to drive my point home:

»it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=···43325049

Let us know what you end up going with + what you roll out!
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.