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koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to trparky

Re: Is on-board RealTek audio really that bad?

This sounds very, very, very likely. Welcome to how PC hardware works, and why all this "background crap" (like anti-virus software, malware scanners, etc. -- anything that causes an interrupt to be held high (stopped/halted) for a while, such as disk I/O) does nothing but destroy responsiveness of a system. Welcome to what we system administrators have to deal with/troubleshoot as well.

My comments on the quality of audio drivers (regardless of brand) still apply, however.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2

And it's confirmed by a staff member at MalwareBytes that Web Site Blocking does indeed cause these audio issues when combined with specific hardware combinations.

I have to admit that this has got to be one of the most exhausting and lengthy troubleshooting experiences I've ever had to deal with.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog



trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2

Now this is what I like to see...




trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2

My guess is that because whatever is in MalwareBytes' Web Site Blocking calls for a DPC that takes longer than it should, it causes the processor to spend more than it should on a single task. At least, that's what I seem to understand. DPCs, or Deferred Procedure Calls are rather technical.

Because of the nature of audio and the fact that it requires near real-time processing, anything that can cause the CPU to lock itself up doing something else will cause an audible audio dropout.
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog



Cthen

join:2004-08-01
Detroit, MI
Reviews:
·Verizon Wireless..

said by trparky:

My guess is that because whatever is in MalwareBytes' Web Site Blocking calls for a DPC that takes longer than it should, it causes the processor to spend more than it should on a single task. At least, that's what I seem to understand. DPCs, or Deferred Procedure Calls are rather technical.

Because of the nature of audio and the fact that it requires near real-time processing, anything that can cause the CPU to lock itself up doing something else will cause an audible audio dropout.

Now back to the original subject.

That is really why a lot of gamers, audiophiles, enthusiasts, etc prefer a real sound card over onboard audio (including myself). Most times (but not in all cases) onboard audio will use your processor rather than being able to support it's own functions.
--
"I like to refer to myself as an Adult Film Efficienato." - Stuart Bondek


trparky
Apple... YUM
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:2

For the average user that listens to occasional music with a decent pair of headphones, would getting a dedicated sound card be even worth it?
--
Tom
Boycott AT&T uVerse! | Tom's Android Blog


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon FiOS

said by trparky:

For the average user that listens to occasional music with a decent pair of headphones, would getting a dedicated sound card be even worth it?

Frankly, not really. Some might be able to tell the difference, but it also depends on your source material. If what you usually listen to is streaming radio or 160k MP3s, the it really dosen't matter.

Tristan

join:2006-09-10
Nepean, ON
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
·Rogers Hi-Speed
·Bell Sympatico
·TekSavvy Cable

said by sk1939:

said by trparky:

For the average user that listens to occasional music with a decent pair of headphones, would getting a dedicated sound card be even worth it?

Frankly, not really. Some might be able to tell the difference, but it also depends on your source material. If what you usually listen to is streaming radio or 160k MP3s, the it really dosen't matter.

My answer would be... depends on whether you can hear the system noise in your headphones.

I can hear higher frequencies than the average person, and system noise bugs the hell out of me. Putting the speakers an inch away from my ear drum is just going to make the system sound that much more audible.

I'm 40, so technically my high frequency response should be dropping off soon. The younger you are, the higher the frequency you can hear, in general.


QA

@rr.com
reply to koitsu

(like anti-virus software, malware scanners, etc. -- anything that causes an interrupt to be held high (stopped/halted) for a while, such as disk I/O) does nothing but destroy responsiveness of a system. Welcome to what we system administrators have to deal with/troubleshoot as well.

I did some QA work for a well known anti-virus product. One bug I found: An inexperienced developer thought it was a good idea to set the process priority to "REAL TME" during update decompression, because, well, that would make it faster. Faster = less disruption, right? ... It's fixed, now.