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paulbasel

@intergga.ch

Wireless Router with Magic Packets

I have a Linksys WRT54G acting as an access point on the ground floor of my home. It is connected to the main router on the top floor via a TP-Link Powerline connection.

The Powerline has a sleep mode and once in that mode the Linksys cannot wake it up. According to TP-Link support, "If the Router doesnt support so called "Magic Packets" you have the problem you describe.." Unplugging the Linksys and plugging it back in wakes up the Powerline adaptor until the next time it goes into sleep mode. This is a royal pain in the backsides.

I believe that the 54g doesn't support magic packets. Is there a way of configuring it so it does. I have looked at some solutions but they seem very complex.

If there is no way to configure it then what current routers support magic packets. I just want an inexpensive "n" 300 bps router that I can configure as an access point but I want to make sure it has this capability.

Paul



clarknova

join:2010-02-23
Grande Prairie, AB
kudos:7
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

Any Wake On LAN utility will be able to generate magic packets, but the only routers I've seen with that feature would be *nix based, such as EdgeMax, pfsense, Tomato, etc. Any host on the same network could also do the job.

Maybe you'd be better off trying to prevent the thing from sleeping. Can't you just create a backgrounded ping utility to keep the link active?
--
db



eibgrad

join:2010-03-15

1 recommendation

reply to paulbasel

I’ve never heard of a powerline adapter that has a “sleep” mode. Why on earth would this even be necessary for such a low powered device? And if network activity alone can’t awaken it, what good is it? Something else seems amiss here because none of this adds up.



paulbasel

@intergga.ch

I agree that it is silly to have such a sleep mode but TP-Link does. Here is their description:

"Moreover, when there is no Ethernet link, it will automatically switch from its regular "working" power mode to "standby" mode that reduces energy waste by over 65%".

When I talked to their support people, they acknowledged that this is in fact true and that you need a router with magic packets to wake the stupid thing up. When I told them that there was no statement in their requirements that indicated that a router must have this capability, they said they would look into it. Of course they won't.

Paul



eibgrad

join:2010-03-15
reply to paulbasel

Still doesn't make sense. How would any other device (router, desktop, etc.) KNOW to send magic packets to the powerline adapter? Now THAT would be magical. It would have to know the power line adapter was present and needed to have this done, know its MAC address, and finally send the magic packets based on some criteria/algorithm. Routers don’t typically send unsolicited magic packets out to devices, even if they happen to know about them, that wouldn’t make sense. Again, it just doesn't add up, even if we accept their claims about this change in power mode. It still seems like some other piece of information is missing here.

It would be interesting to see what happens if you used a desktop/laptop to periodically send the same packets. You just need a WOL command line utility. Or if you have a dd-wrt/tomato router, use the embedded ether-wake utility and a script. Or perhaps just ping it periodically so it never sleeps at all (assuming it even has an IP address, of course).



paulbasel

@intergga.ch

I agree that it doesn't make much sense. I'm going to get back in touch with them to see what a different support tech has to say about the issue. If they don't come up with something more logical I'll try your other suggestions. Many thanks

Paul



paulbasel

@intergga.ch
reply to clarknova

I am a real novice when it comes to networks so my comments are probably way off base. Wake On LAN utility - aren't these used to wake up a PC from a remote location?

I'm trying to get a router to wake up a powerline adaptor. My laptop and desktop are not always online, but I want to be able to use my iPad or Nexus 7 from the ground floor when the laptop and desktop on the top floor are either off or in standby.

Doesn't a background ping utility need to be installed on a PC? If the PC is off, will it still work?

Paul



clarknova

join:2010-02-23
Grande Prairie, AB
kudos:7
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

said by paulbasel :

Wake On LAN utility - aren't these used to wake up a PC from a remote location?

Not just a personal computer--any computer. Your adapter is a simple computer. I agree with the others that it's ridiculous that your adapter goes to sleep and needs a magic packet to wake up, but if that's true, then you need a WOL utility or some kind of keepalive mechanism.

Doesn't a background ping utility need to be installed on a PC? If the PC is off, will it still work?

Such a keepalive utility would need to run on something that is running and connected to the LAN port of the TP-Link. If you have no such computer then you may need to cut your losses and go buy an adapter that is going to continue to function even with noting active connected to it.
--
db


paulbasel

@intergga.ch

In the last 36 hours I have had my Nexus 7 in standby mode with the WiFi turned on in the living room where the access point and powerline adaptor is located. So far I have not had to restart the access point to connect to the adaptor. Perhaps the Nexus is keeping it awake. I can't be sure yet but I will continue to test it this week. If it doesn't I'll get back in touch with TP-Link support.

Thanks for all your help and suggestions.

Paul



BlueMist

join:2011-01-24
Cookeville, TN

Provided TP-Link verifies that it's device will wake up when a Wake On LAN packet is seen you do have an option. If your router does not have that option built into it you can still have it provided you want to upgrade the firmware of the router. It appears that the Wake On LAN option is available in all the current versions of DD-WRT.

»www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wh···Versions

Should you care to upgrade your router to DD-WRT firmware first verify the hardware version of you box is on the below list.

»www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Su···b.2Fg.29

Be sure to follow the upgrade instructions found on the far right of the spreadsheet for the exact model you are upgrading. The instructions vary depending on what hardware version (1.1, 2.1,3.0, etc) your box actually is and not just that it's a WRT54G.

Good luck on what ever you decide...


paulpuente

join:2013-05-09

I thought I would give everyone who responded to me on this question an update. The following is the latest email from TP-Link:

"Sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused. Unfortunately, your first email cannot be found anymore after two months. Maybe there is some misunderstanding in the previous communication.

Actually, as I confirmed, magic packets is related to a totally different issue than Wake on LAN via internet.

Besides, only TL-PA211 will go to power-saving mode; TL-WPA281 wont. TL-PA211 will switch to Power-saving Mode automatically 5 minutes later since the device connected to the Homeplug is powered off.

If TL-PA211 connected to your PC wont wake up, it may have a compatibility issue with network card on your PC. Please kindly send back model number of your network card.

Currently, we can switch off power-saving mode on TL-PA211 by installing the beta software."


I am waiting for the beta software and will be installing it soon. I'll let you know if it works.

Paul



eibgrad

join:2010-03-15

1 edit
reply to paulbasel

Based on your recent communications, sounds to me (for all intents and purposes) they’re admitting they made a mistake. They didn't take into consideration that someone might want to wake the device connected to the powerline adapter, but instead assumed if the connected device was OFF, well heck, we might as well turn the powerline adapter OFF too! It all makes sense ASSUMING the attached device doesn't need WOL services. And I’m sure we would all agree; that's an asinine assumption.

As I said before, why on earth they would even bother providing this option, and esp. by default, and for an infrastructure device no less (not an edge device), baffles me. I wasn't even aware any vendor did this.

BTW, thanks for the update.